After Dark (Large Print Edition)

( 66 )

Overview

I have taken some pains to string together the various stories contained in this Volume on a single thread of interest, which, so far as I know, has at least the merit of not having been used before.
The pages entitled "Leah's Diary" are, however, intended to fulfill another purpose besides that of serving as the frame-work for my collection of tales. In this part of the book, and subsequently in the Prologues to the stories, it has been my object to give the reader one more ...
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After Dark

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Overview

I have taken some pains to string together the various stories contained in this Volume on a single thread of interest, which, so far as I know, has at least the merit of not having been used before.
The pages entitled "Leah's Diary" are, however, intended to fulfill another purpose besides that of serving as the frame-work for my collection of tales. In this part of the book, and subsequently in the Prologues to the stories, it has been my object to give the reader one more glimpse at that artist-life which circumstances have afforded me peculiar opportunities of studying, and which I have already tried to represent, under another aspect, in my fiction, "Hide-and-Seek." This time I wish to ask some sympathy for the joys and sorrows of a poor traveling portrait-painter-presented from his wife's point of view in "Leah's Diary," and supposed to be briefly and simply narrated by himself in the Prologues to the stories. I have purposely kept these two portions of the book within certain limits; only giving, in the one case, as much as the wife might naturally write in her diary at intervals of household leisure; and, in the other, as much as a modest and sensible man would be likely to say about himself and about the characters he met with in his wanderings. If I have been so fortunate as to make my idea intelligible by this brief and simple mode of treatment, and if I have, at the same time, achieved the necessary object of gathering several separate stories together as neatly-fitting parts of one complete whole, I shall have succeeded in a design which I have for some time past been very anxious creditably to fulfill.
Of the tales themselves, taken individually, I have only to say, by way of necessary explanation, that "The Lady of Glenwith Grange" is now offered to the reader for the first time; and that the other stories have appeared in the columns of Household Words. My best thanks are due to Mr. Charles Dickens for his kindness in allowing me to set them in their present frame-work.
I must also gratefully acknowledge an obligation of another kind to the accomplished artist, Mr. W. S. Herrick, to whom I am indebted for the curious and interesting facts on which the tales of "The Terribly Strange Bed" and "The Yellow Mask" are founded.
Although the statement may appear somewhat superfluous to those who know me, it may not be out of place to add, in conclusion, that these stories are entirely of my own imagining, constructing, and writing. The fact that the events of some of my tales occur on foreign ground, and are acted out by foreign personages, appears to have suggested in some quarters the inference that the stories themselves might be of foreign origin. Let me, once for all, assure any readers who may honor me with their attention, that in this, and in all other cases, they may depend on the genuineness of my literary offspring. The little children of my brain may be weakly enough, and may be sadly in want of a helping hand to aid them in their first attempts at walking on the stage of this great world; but, at any rate, they are not borrowed children. The members of my own literary family are indeed increasing so fast as to render the very idea of borrowing quite out of the question, and to suggest serious apprehension that I may not have done adding to the large book-population, on my own sole responsibility, even yet.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781491054246
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 7/20/2013
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 1,294,569
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.73 (d)

Meet the Author

Wilkie Collins
Wilkie Collins
If you think Victorian literature is quaint, you haven’t read anything by Wilkie Collins. Often considered the father of the English detective novel, Collins has thrilled readers with suspenseful gothic tales such as The Woman in White and The Moonstone.

Biography

Wilkie Collins has long been overshadowed by his friend and collaborator Charles Dickens -- unfortunately for readers who have consequently not discovered one of literature's most compelling writers. His novels are ceremonious and none too brief; they are also irresistible. Take the opening lines of his 1852 story of marital deceit, Basil: "What am I now about to write? The history of little more than the events of one year, out of the twenty-four years of my life. Why do I undertake such an employment as this? Perhaps, because I think that my narrative may do good; because I hope that, one day, it may be put to some warning use." It's a typical Collins opening, one that draws the reader in with a tone that's personal, but carries formality and import.

With his long, frizzy black beard and wide, sloping forehead, Collins looked like a grandfatherly type, even in his 30s. But his thinking and lifestyle were unconventional, even a bit ahead of his time. His characters (particularly the women) have a Henry James–like predilection for bucking social mores, and he occasionally found his work under attack by morality-mongers. Collins was well aware of his books' potential to offend certain Victorian sensibilities, and there is evidence in some of his writings that he was prepared for it, if not welcoming of it. He writes in the preface to Armadale, his 1866 novel about a father's deathbed murder confession, "Estimated by the clap-trap morality of the present day, this may be a very daring book. Judged by the Christian morality which is of all time, it is only a book that is daring enough to speak the truth."

Collins began his career by writing his painter father's biography. He gained popularity when he began publishing stories and serialized novels in Dickens's publications, Household Words and All the Year Round. His best-known works are The Woman in White and The Moonstone, both of which -- along with Basil -- have been made into films.

Collins often alludes to fantastic, supernatural happenings in his stories; the events themselves are usually borne out by reasonable explanations. What remains are the electrifying effects one human being can have upon another, for better and for worse. His main characters are often described in terms such as "remarkable," "extraordinary," and "singular," lending their actions -- and thereby the story -- a special urgency. In one of his great successes, 1860's The Woman in White, Collins spins what is basically a magnificent con story into something almost ghostly: The fates of two look-alike women -- a beautiful, well-off woman and a poor insane-asylum escapee -- are intertwined and manipulated by two evil men. One of those is among the best fictional villains ever created, the kill-‘em-with-kindness Count Fosco. Fosco is emblematic of another Collins hallmark -- antagonists who manage to throw their victims off guard by some powerful charm of personality or appearance.

The Moonstone, published in 1868, is regarded by many to be the first English detective novel. Starring the unassuming Sergeant Cuff, it follows the trail of a sought-after yellow diamond from India that has fallen into the wrong hands. Like The Woman in White, the novel is told in multiple first person narratives that display Collins's gift for distinctive and often humorous voices. Whether it is servants, foreigners, or the wealthy, Collins is an equal-opportunity satirist who quietly but deftly pokes fun at human foibles even as he draws nuanced, memorable characters.

Though The Woman in White and The Moonstone are Collins's standouts, he had a productive, consistent career; the novels Armadale, No Name and Poor Miss Finch are worthwhile reads, and his short stories will particularly appeal to Edgar Allan Poe fans. Fortunately in the case of this underappreciated writer, there are plenty of titles to appreciate.

Good To Know

Collins studied law, and though he never practiced as a lawyer, his knowledge of the subject is evident in his fiction. He also apprenticed with a tea merchant in his pre-publication years.

He was addicted to laudanum, a form of opium that he used to treat his pain from rheumatic gout.

Collins never married, but he had a long-term live-in relationship with one woman, and a second romance that produced three children.

He is named after popular artist Sir David Wilkie; both his parents were painters who counted Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth among their friends.

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    1. Also Known As:
      William Wilkie Collins (full name)
      Wilkie Collins
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 8, 1824
    2. Place of Birth:
      London, England
    1. Date of Death:
      September 23, 1889
    2. Place of Death:
      London, England

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 66 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(28)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(18)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 67 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    Book

    Never read this it's a bad book

    10 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2013

    In response to a person

    Dude your an idiot. This book is free. So how can you say its not worth a penny because its so short when it didnt even cost anything????????????

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Should you read this no why

    Its so short 20 pages is not worth a penny. Its boring and dosent keep you wanting more. DONT READ !!!!!!!

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    It has 363 pages, who ever said that it was 20 pages was dumb!

    There is 363 pages not twenty!!!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2012

    Capitally Interesting

    This work of literature is a fine addition to collins' work, a most delicious and intriguing novel which, forsooth, I bid you to partake of

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2012

    Gggfgggggggggggggggggghgggggggggghhhhhhhhlhhhhhhhbbbbhhgghgggggggggggggffffgffffdddefrfrffffrffggfgcgggggggggggggggggggggtgtyhnvbkbkbkbkbkhkubjvhvjvhgjvjgjjghhghguguvhfhfhchfhgcvgbfhffjhhfhfhfhfhfjfjffbbcnfjcjcjcckkvgiggkgigigjrufnfjdhfdhdyhgtkfggyhh

    Gvhgjfhfhggycvhvhjvbggggggggggjhvbbbbvvvvvvvvvvbbbbbbbbbbbbbvgvbggggghhgggffgcfgfggggggvvcccxvfghfgfvcbbmnggf

    4 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2012

    What????

    3 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 11, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jaglvr for TeensReadToo.com

    AFTER DARK is the third installment in the VAMPS series. It picks up where NIGHT LIFE leaves off; everyone of Old Blood consequence is attending the Rauhnacht Grand Ball at the Orlock estate. But the night turns sour when the Van Helsings show up and start attacking.

    Callie is stunned when she sees her old flame, Peter, among the hunters. And Lilith is awestruck when she finds out that Xander Orlock, aka EXO, is partly responsible for her rescue.

    But after the Grand Ball, things are no longer the same. Lilith's mother is now dead, and along with her, all the undead and anything associated with her blood right. And Callie's mother and protectors are also gone. In light of these changes, Callie has now been invited to move into the Todd household. She's still not ousted as Victor Todd's daughter, and Lilith is seething at having Callie move into her mother's rooms.

    There are some bright spots, though. Callie's fashion designs were discovered by none other than Sister Midnight at the Ball. After showing Sister her sketches, Callie is invited to have her own runway show at Sister's boutique. But unfortunately, Lilith is to be the star model. Callie can work with that, if she has to.

    AFTER DARK is a fun look at the lighter side of vampire family struggles. Callie and Lilith want nothing to do with each other, yet circumstance keep bringing the two of them together. The story moves quickly and engrosses the reader from the first page. The story flows better having read the previous two installments, but readers can quickly pick up the gist of the story if this is their first foray into the VAMPS series.

    I don't know when the next installment of VAMPS will be out, but AFTER DARK leaves so many loose ends, you just know there has to be one! I for one will be keeping my eyes open for it!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    so boring

    What is going on

    2 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2012

    What is this about????

    2 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 17, 2011

    best vampire book ever

    the best non-crummie vampire book ever

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2013

    Bad book

    THIS IS BOINGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG BAD BOOKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK ID GIVE IT A 0 IF I COULDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2013

    Is it good

    Im 11and i need to know if this book is good for me to read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2014

    ok

    I heard someome say it does not have 'sex' in it so what do you tthinkk the age ranges are?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2014

    Ahhh

    What is up with all these people reviewing asking if it has sex, well if you people want a sex story read AN EROTICA novel

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2014

    Uhu

    Blah

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Shadow

    ?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2013

    You cam get this for free

    Search it its free but i hate this book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2013

    ????????????

    What is this about????????

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2013

    Good

    I really liked this book my only dislike is of How short it was but its a really good book i liked how she used the words to describe what was going on

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 67 Customer Reviews

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