After Hamelin

( 1 )

Overview

Implicit in many folk and fairy tales is the question, 'Then what?'

After Hamelin picks up the story where the Robert Browning poem -- or other tellings of The Pied Piper of Hamelin -- leaves off. In a quest that is both contemporary and timeless, Richardson creates a magical world through inventive wordplay, uninhibited imagination and a facility with rhyme. Here is a raconteur who spins a narrative tale that takes readers into strange lands inhabited by unusual characters, ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (60) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $1.99   
  • Used (57) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Implicit in many folk and fairy tales is the question, 'Then what?'

After Hamelin picks up the story where the Robert Browning poem -- or other tellings of The Pied Piper of Hamelin -- leaves off. In a quest that is both contemporary and timeless, Richardson creates a magical world through inventive wordplay, uninhibited imagination and a facility with rhyme. Here is a raconteur who spins a narrative tale that takes readers into strange lands inhabited by unusual characters, both good and evil, where adventure abounds and unlikely saviors emerge.

Penelope is 101 years old, but she can remember the story like it happened yesterday. On the morning of her eleventh birthday, she wakes to discover she can no longer hear. It is on this same day that the Piper returns to Hamelin to spirit the children away in an evil act of revenge upon the townspeople. Spared because she is deaf to the
Piper's bewitching tune, Penelope is left to grieve the loss of her friends and beloved sister Sophy until Cuthbert, the wise man of the village, reveals that Penelope possesses the unusual gift of deep dreaming. Armed only with a charm from Cuthbert and her own courage, Penelope enters the land of sleep on a treacherous quest to rescue the stolen children.

There is suspense, humor and high excitement (wrapped in dark undercurrents) as Penelope and the companions she meets along the way -- Scally, her trusted cat; Alloway, the blind harpist; Ulysses, a three-legged dog; and Quentin, a dragon who loves skipping -- journey to the Piper's mountain fortress. Their combined wits and talents see them through strange landscapes and close calls. In a thrilling climax played out in a mysterious place between dreaming and waking, they triumph over the Piper and set the children of Hamelin free.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Napra Review
Delightful and thoughtful ... This intriguing tale invents a complete and believable alternative world.
Booklist - Anne O'Malley
Finely realized characters ... Blending aspects of classical myth and literary fantasy, the tale builds to a fine resolution and casts a hypnotic spell.
Canadian Materials - Susan Fonseca
Not only is After Hamelin a page-turning adventure story that children will love, it is also a teacher's dream. Read this story aloud to a class and savour the amazing characters, the images, the rhymes, the songs, and the play of Richardson's language. Enter a dream world of adventure, populated by talking cats, three-legged dogs and skipping dragons... Bill Richardson is a magician who spins magic with his words. A gifted storyteller, a writer, a broadcaster, as well as a former children's librarian, he has written several humorous books for adults, including Bachelor Brothers' Bed & Breakfast. After Hamelin is his first children's novel.... [The book] has excellent curriculum ties in the areas of storytelling, friendship, travel, courage, magic, fantasy, relationships, deafness, sexism, Middle Ages, imagery, character development, voice and language. This fantasy novel is a tribute to the skill and vision of an amazing writer! Highly Recommended.
Napra Review
Delightful and thoughtful ... This intriguing tale invents a complete and believable alternative world.
Anne O'Malley
Blending aspects of classical myth and literary fantasy, the tale builds to a fine resolution and casts a hypnotic spell.
Timothy Capehart
The writing is detailed and lively, peppered with rope-rhymes and songs ... excellent fantasy.
—Voice of Youth Advocates, April 2001
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Featuring a wild and unpredictable dreamscape, this surrealistic tale begins 90 years after the Pied Piper of Hamelin's tale ends. Penelope, at age 101, is the only villager old enough to remember the events, and she records her account of what really happened to her town's children. She begins with her 11th birthday, marked by three significant occurrences. First she is mysteriously struck deaf. Then she watches helplessly as the piper lures her older sister and friends out of the city with an enchanting melody (her deafness spares her from the same fate). Next a mysterious town elder informs Penelope that she alone can rescue the children by journeying to a magic land that can be entered only through dreams. After falling into a deep sleep, Penelope embarks on her dangerous mission and, with the aid of a talking cat, a featherless snowbird and a rope-skipping dragon, she sets out to find the piper and his imprisoned victims. First-time YA novelist Richardson provides an effective framework for his narrative, juxtaposing the poetic musings of 101-year-old Penelope against the childhood adventure she meticulously recalls. Penelope emerges as a far more convincing character than her traveling companions, whose bizarre traits and talents seem too neatly tailored to advance the plot. If the events are somewhat convoluted and unevenly paced, Penelope's wise, sometimes bitter voice remains fresh and provocative. Ages 10-13. (Jan.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
VOYA
Narrating from the vantage point of her 101st year, Penelope recounts the events that followed the abduction of the children in the town of Hamelin. Penelope awoke unable to hear on the morning of her eleventh birthday. That was also the morning that the Piper returned to pipe the children away because his payment for ridding the town of rats was not forthcoming. Penelope is spared, and the town's Wiseman, Cuthbert, tells her that she is the only one who can save the other children. She has the talent for Deep Dreaming, which enables her to cross the borders between the waking and dreaming worlds at will. Despite her parents' fears, Penelope sets off, and as she makes her way toward the Piper's lair, she is joined by her talking cat, the singing Trolavaian, and a rope-skipping dragon. The Piper is more than he seems to be, and Penelope discovers that she and her friends are also. This quest story harbors echoes of both Oz and Wonderland, with touches of their humor and a good helping of their darkness. The supporting characters, like those in many fairy tales, are not warts-and-all, three-dimensional creatures; however, Penelope, her mentor Cuthbert, and her smart-aleck cat, Scallywaggle are. The writing is detailed and lively, peppered with rope-rhymes and songs. A nearly last-minute narrative switch from addressing the reader to addressing a specific person in the time of centenarian Penelope feels a little forced. Nevertheless this excellent fantasy should be placed in the hands of Donna Jo Napoli fans or, for that matter, fans of Gregory Maguire's adult fantasy, Trade pb. VOYA CODES: 5Q 4P J S (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Broad general YA appeal; Junior High,defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2000, Annick Press, 144p, . Ages 13 to 18. Reviewer: Timothy Capehart SOURCE: VOYA, April 2001 (Vol. 24, No.1)
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-When Penelope wakes up on her 11th birthday in the town of Hamelin, she can no longer hear. On the same day, the Pied Piper returns to seek revenge for not having been paid for ridding the town of rats. He plays his pipe to entrap the children and leads them into the world of dreams. Unable to hear, Penelope is spared. When Cuthbert, a wise hermit, visits her, he tells her of her special gift, Deep Dreaming, and explains that she is the only one who can rescue the others. With many misgivings, Penelope sets off on her journey and with the help of various companions, saves the youngsters and renews the spell that will keep the Piper asleep and harmless. This imaginative story is narrated by Penelope, now 101 years old, and it moves back and forth from past to present and from the real world to the world of dreaming. Full of wonderful characters such as Quentin, a dragon that skips rope, the tale bounces along quickly. Unfortunately, it too often moves in a direction of convenience and coincidence without the internal logic necessary to all good fantasy. Why, for example, do doors conveniently appear with no rhyme or reason? What caused Penelope to wake up deaf in the first place? This lively continuation of the story of the Pied Piper is certainly interesting, but not totally convincing.-Barbara Scotto, Michael Driscoll School, Brookline, MA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An expansion of the classic story of the pied piper, this tells of young Penelope, left behind when the piper returns for the children of Hamelin after saving the town from rats. On her 11th birthday, she must enter the world of dreams, accompanied by an eclectic assortment of companions—a talking cat, a jump-roping dragon, a blind harpist—and eventually face the piper himself in a battle of power, greed, and music. Narrated by a 101-year-old Penelope, the story bounces between recollections of the adventure, ruminations on her life, and meeting another Penelope, who is approaching her 11th birthday. By trying to incorporate too many subplots, Richardson fails to explain some of the more central points of the main story. He also introduces and dismisses concepts and props with no consistency. Penelope brings a jump rope with her, but it is rarely mentioned until she has use for it. The only way for Penelope to resist the piper's enchanted music is to not hear it; she suddenly becomes deaf on her 11th birthday, an occurrence left unexplained. Nor does the reader ever find out why she conveniently regains her hearing upon entering the dreamland. Contrived and disjointed, this is an original interpretation that lacks development. Likely to attract lovers of fairy-tales, but it will disappoint. (Fiction. 11-13)
Booklist
Blending aspects of classical myth and literary fantasy, the tale builds to a fine resolution and casts a hypnotic spell.
— Anne O'Malley
Canadian Materials
This fantasy novel is a tribute to the skill and vision of an amazing writer! Highly Recommended.
— Susan Fonseca
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781550376289
  • Publisher: Annick Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/2/2000
  • Pages: 144
  • Age range: 10 - 13 Years
  • Lexile: 550L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Bill Richardson lives in Vancouver, where he works as a writer and well-known broadcaster. He is the author of several humorous books for adults, including the popular Bachelor Brothers' Bed and Breakfast titles (Douglas & McIntyre/St. Martin's Press). A talented storyteller and former children's librarian, this is his first book for children.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 17, 2010

    Awesome. Awesome book!

    I was pretty reluctant to pick up this book since it is a (spinoff) sequel to an old tale (which happens to be my ultimate fav), I'm not that into "Little Kid Saving The World" jazz, and the fact that most of the reviews I read were from moms who read this to their little kids (I'm 18). So I checked it out from the library. Finished it in less than a week. And it's a very good sized book nearly 300 pages so it's not your 180 big text book. And the characters were awesome~! I loved the Piper. Penelope was awesome and lacked a whiny-hero-girl complex. The dream world was believable and age appropriate to the characters (Talking cats, flying singing bird like things, dragons, and pretty much other things that kids that age would think about). This is truly. A book you should pick up. I'm going to buy 2 copies (one for school since I need it for debate so I'm going to have to write in it *sob*) and one for reading (hard cover for sure~!) So people who love The Pied Piper heck even if you hate the guy READ IT! You'll love it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2004

    Beyond the Greatests

    Wonderful novel...smoothly written...depicts different point of views fabulously...Awesome plot.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)