After King Philip's War: Presence and Persistence in Indian New England [NOOK Book]

Overview

The 1676 killing of Metacomet, the tribal leader dubbed "King Philip" by colonists, is commonly seen as a watershed event, marking the end of a bloody war, dissolution of Indian society in New England, and even the disappearance of Native peoples from the region. This collection challenges that assumption, showing that Indians adapted and survived, existing quietly on the fringes of Yankee society, less visible than before but nonetheless retaining a distinct identity and heritage. While confinement on tiny ...
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After King Philip's War: Presence and Persistence in Indian New England

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Overview

The 1676 killing of Metacomet, the tribal leader dubbed "King Philip" by colonists, is commonly seen as a watershed event, marking the end of a bloody war, dissolution of Indian society in New England, and even the disappearance of Native peoples from the region. This collection challenges that assumption, showing that Indians adapted and survived, existing quietly on the fringes of Yankee society, less visible than before but nonetheless retaining a distinct identity and heritage. While confinement on tiny reservations, subjection to increasing state regulation, enforced abandonment of traditional dress and means of support, and racist policies did cause dramatic changes, Natives nonetheless managed to maintain their Indianness through customs, kinship, and community.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Colin G. Calloway is Professor of History and Native American Studies at Dartmouth College. His many books include New Worlds for All 1997 and The American Revolution in Indian Country 1995. He has also edited North Country Captives 1992 and Dawnland Encounters 1991.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Surviving the Dark Ages
Revisiting The Redeemed Captive: New Perspectives on the 1704 Attack on Deerfield
The "Disappearance" of the Abenaki in Western Maine: Political Organization and Ethnocentric Assumptions
The First Whalemen of Nantucket
The Right to a Name: The Narragansett People and Rhode Island Officials in the Revolutionary Era
"Divorced" from the Land: Resistance and Survival of Indian Women in Eighteenth-Century New England
"Once More Let Us Consider": William Apess in the Writing of New England Native American History
The Massachusetts Indian Enfranchisement Act: Ethnic Contest in Historical Context, 1849-1869
Unseen Neighbors: Native Americans of Central Massachusetts, A People Who Had "Vanished"
Tribal Network and Migrant Labor: Mi'kmaq Indians as Seasonal Workers in Aroostook's Potato Fields, 1870-1980

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