After the Dream: Black and White Southerners since 1965

After the Dream: Black and White Southerners since 1965

by Timothy J. Minchin, John A. Salmond
     
 

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Martin Luther King's 1965 address from Montgomery, Alabama, the center of much racial conflict at the time and the location of the well-publicized bus boycott a decade earlier, is often considered by historians to be the culmination of the civil rights era in American history. In his momentous speech, King declared that segregation was "on its deathbed" and that

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Overview

Martin Luther King's 1965 address from Montgomery, Alabama, the center of much racial conflict at the time and the location of the well-publicized bus boycott a decade earlier, is often considered by historians to be the culmination of the civil rights era in American history. In his momentous speech, King declared that segregation was "on its deathbed" and that the movement had already achieved significant milestones. Although the civil rights movement had won many battles in the struggle for racial equality by the mid-1960s, including legislation to guarantee black voting rights and to desegregate public accommodations, the fight to implement the new laws was just starting. In reality, King's speech in Montgomery represented a new beginning rather than a conclusion to the movement, a fact that King acknowledged in the address.

After the Dream: Black and White Southerners since 1965 begins where many histories of the civil rights movement end, with King's triumphant march from the iconic battleground of Selma to Montgomery. Timothy J. Minchin and John Salmond focus on events in the South following the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. After the Dream examines the social, economic, and political implications of these laws in the decades following their passage, discussing the empowerment of black southerners, white resistance, accommodation and acceptance, and the nation's political will. The book also provides a fascinating history of the often-overlooked period of race relations during the presidential administrations of Ford, Carter, Reagan, and both George H. W. and George W. Bush. Ending with the election of President Barack Obama, this study will influence contemporary historiography on the civil rights movement.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[W]ell-researched and -written.... this book is an important addition to the scholarship on civil rights, and is the definitive work on the implementation of the advances and setbacks made in the South in the cause of civil rights since 1965." — H-Net Reviews

"In their magisterial book... Minchin and Salmond have deliverd the historical profession a fluid, highly readable, and impeccably researched account of the challenges, struggles, and successes of civil rights in the last forty-five years." — Ohio Valley History

"Minchin and Salmond... focus on events in the American South following the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. 'After the Dream' examines the social, economic and political implications of these laws in the decades following their passage, discussing the empowerment of Black southerners, white resistance, accommodation and acceptance, and the nation's political will." — Phillidelphia Tribune

" After the Dream is a meticulously documented and well-written survey that stretches teh complicated history of desegregation in the American South from 1965 into the twenty-first century." — North Carolina Hisotrical Review

"Effectively goes where few previous analyses have gone by extending the discussion from the 1960s into the twenty-first century." — Register of the Kentucky Historical Society

"Essential reading for scholars and general readers who want to understand efforts to implement the civl rights revolution in the South after 1965.... In lucid prose, the author take the reader through the historic attempts to fulfill the dream of racial equality articulated by Martin Luther King, Jr." — Arkansas Historical Quarterly

"Offers a broad, synthetic overview of the forty-plus years since the zenith of the modern civil rights movement." — Journal of American History

"Provide insight into how everyday people responded to the social revolution that changed everything and left so much undone." — Journal of Southern History

"The book is a useful reference for those seeking an overview of political and economic developments that affected the civil rights struggle in the late 20th century." — Greta de Jong, Journal of African American History

"Minchin and Salmond have given us a better understanding of the copmlex history of desegregation in the South and thus have made an important contribution to the literature on the civil rights movement." — Elizabeth Fones-Wolf, West Virginia History

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813129785
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
Publication date:
02/16/2011
Series:
Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century Series
Pages:
424
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.50(d)

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