After the World Trade Center: Rethinking New York City

After the World Trade Center: Rethinking New York City

by Michael Sorkin
     
 

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The terrorist attacks of September 11 have created an unprecedented public discussion about the uses and meanings of the central area of lower Manhattan that was once the World Trade Center. While the city sifts through the debris, contrary forces shaping its future are at work. Developers jockey to control the right to rebuild "ground zero." Financial firms line up… See more details below

Overview

The terrorist attacks of September 11 have created an unprecedented public discussion about the uses and meanings of the central area of lower Manhattan that was once the World Trade Center. While the city sifts through the debris, contrary forces shaping its future are at work. Developers jockey to control the right to rebuild "ground zero." Financial firms line up for sweetheart deals while proposals for memorials are gaining in appeal. In After the World Trade Center, eminent social critics Sharon Zukin and Michael Sorkin call on New York's most acclaimed urbanists to consider the impact of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center and what it bodes for the future of New York. Contributors take a close look at the reaction to the attack from a variety of New York communities and discuss possible effects on public life in the city.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Beginning as a local tragedy, the attack on the World Trade Center towers quickly assumed both national and international import. This collection of essays, edited by social critics Sorkin (editor, The Next Jerusalem) and Zukin (Landscapes of Power), seeks to revisit the tragedy as a local event and consider September 11 in light of New York's urban history. The essays, by the editors and 17 urbanists, examine how the towers came to be built and the neighborhoods that had to be destroyed to make way for this paean to international commerce. They also examine the chilling parallels between this attack and the Wall Street bombing of 1920, as well as the violation of the building codes that took place during construction of the towers. Throughout, there is deep concern for what the towers' construction and demolition and likely plans for reconstruction have to say about democracy in the nation's financial capital. Collectively, all the contributors (e.g., Marshall Berman, Beverly Gage, Edwin G. Burrows) call for a more democratic New York, one where the voices of all the people can be heard, not just the economically and politically powerful. Recommended for academic and larger public library collections in urban studies and New York history. Christopher Brennan, SUNY at Brockport Lib. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781135774950
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
09/05/2013
Series:
Cultural Spaces
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
File size:
3 MB

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