After Tobacco: What Would Happen If Americans Stopped Smoking? by Peter Bearman, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
After Tobacco: What Would Happen If Americans Stopped Smoking?

After Tobacco: What Would Happen If Americans Stopped Smoking?

by Peter Bearman
     
 

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States have banned smoking in workplaces, restaurants, and bars. They have raised tobacco tax rates, extended "clean air" laws, and mounted dramatic anti-smoking campaigns. Nevertheless, tobacco use remains high among Americans, with one out of five adults smoking. Health professionals now realize that significantly reducing these rates requires bolder measures,

Overview

States have banned smoking in workplaces, restaurants, and bars. They have raised tobacco tax rates, extended "clean air" laws, and mounted dramatic anti-smoking campaigns. Nevertheless, tobacco use remains high among Americans, with one out of five adults smoking. Health professionals now realize that significantly reducing these rates requires bolder measures, including a direct confrontation with the fear that controlling tobacco more strictly carries enormous social and economic consequences.

Retail and hospitality businesses worry that smoking bans and excise taxes will cripple profit, and with tobacco farming and cigarette manufacturing concentrated in southeastern states, policymakers in Kentucky, North Carolina, Virginia, and elsewhere fear the impact on the regional economy. These concerns are not necessarily unfounded, but there has been no comprehensive survey of the impact of tobacco control across the nation. This book, the result of research commissioned by the American Legacy Foundation and Columbia University's Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, considers the economic impact of reducing smoking rates on tobacco farmers, cigarette factory workers, the southeastern regional economy, state governments, tobacco retailers, the hospitality industry, and nonprofit organizations who might benefit from the industry's philanthropy. It also weighs how reduction in smoking will affect mortality rates, medical costs, and Social Security. Concluding essays consider the implications of more vigorous tobacco control policy for law enforcement, smokers who face social stigma, the mentally ill who may cope through tobacco, and disparities in health by race, social class, and gender.

Editorial Reviews

Health Affairs
a welcome contribution to an important public health topic for students as well as policy makers.

Thomas E. Novotny
This collection dealing with the economic 'fallout' of a nonsmoking society provides a solid scientific basis for understanding just what would be the costs, benefits, and consequences if all the hard-fought interventions against smoking succeeded. This should be mandatory reading for policy makers and public health professionals who need to fully understand and communicate the benefits of a smoke-free society to those who remain skeptical about these benefits.

Allan M. Brandt
As these important essays so clearly show, if America became truly smoke free, the social, economic, and health consequences would be nothing short of profound. The essays collected here—representing diverse disciplinary approaches—point us toward the next critical phase of informed and effective tobacco control policies.

Steven A. Schroeder
What would happen if smoking rates plummeted because of more vigorous application of proven policies such as increasing the taxes on tobacco products and expanding the range of smoke-free locations? After Tobacco rigorously examines the potential impact of greatly decreased tobacco use on myriad sectors. It is an important resource for those interested in public policy, public health, government, economics, and health care.

Contemporary Sociology - Ross Koppel
...provides a full, scholarly, creative, interdisciplinary, and thoughtful analysis.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231157766
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
08/16/2011
Pages:
456
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Peter Bearman is the Cole Professor of the Social Sciences, director of the Lazarsfeld Center for the Social Sciences, and codirector of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars Program at Columbia University. The founding director of ISERP (Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy) and a recipient of the NIH Director's Pioneer Award, his additional projects include understanding the increased prevalence of autism. He is the author of Doormen and coediter of the Handbook of Analytic Sociology.

Kathryn M. Neckerman is a research associate in the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago and former associate director of the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP). She is the author of Schools Betrayed: Roots of Failure in Inner-City Education and editor of Social Inequality, and she writes on topics related to urban inequality, health disparities, and the built environment.

Leslie Wright is the former project coordinator for the Center of Excellence in Women's Health at Boston University School of Medicine and former assistant director of the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy at Columbia University. In both of these positions, she participated in the initiation, oversight, and administration of several public health grants, community outreach projects, and education programs, including the Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholars Program.

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