Afterward

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Overview

Edith Wharton (1862-1937), born Edith Newbold Jones, was an American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She combined her insider's view of America's privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humourous and incisive novels and short stories. Wharton was well-acquainted with many of her era's literary and public figures, including Henry James and Theodore Roosevelt. Besides her writing, she was a highly regarded landscape architect, interior designer, and taste-maker of her time. She wrote ...
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Afterward

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Overview

Edith Wharton (1862-1937), born Edith Newbold Jones, was an American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She combined her insider's view of America's privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humourous and incisive novels and short stories. Wharton was well-acquainted with many of her era's literary and public figures, including Henry James and Theodore Roosevelt. Besides her writing, she was a highly regarded landscape architect, interior designer, and taste-maker of her time. She wrote several influential books, including The Decoration of Houses (1897), her first published work, and Italian Villas and Their Gardens (1904). The Age of Innocence (1920), perhaps her best known work, won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize for literature, making her the first woman to win the award. Her other works include: The Greater Inclination (1899), The Touchstone (1900), Sanctuary (1903), The Descent of Man and Other Stories (1904), The House of Mirth (1905), Madame de Treymes (1907), The Fruit of the Tree (1907), The Hermit and the Wild Woman and Other Stories (1908), Ethan Frome (1912), In Morocco (1921) and The Glimpses of the Moon (1921).
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781493657278
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 11/1/2013
  • Pages: 60
  • Product dimensions: 5.06 (w) x 7.81 (h) x 0.12 (d)

Meet the Author

Edith Wharton (1862-1937), born Edith Newbold Jones, was an American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She combined her insider's view of America's privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humourous and incisive novels and short stories. Wharton was well-acquainted with many of her era's literary and public figures, including Henry James and Theodore Roosevelt. Besides her writing, she was a highly regarded landscape architect, interior designer, and taste-maker of her time

Biography

Edith Newbold Jones was born January 24, 1862, into such wealth and privilege that her family inspired the phrase "keeping up with the Joneses." The youngest of three children, Edith spent her early years touring Europe with her parents and, upon the family's return to the United States, enjoyed a privileged childhood in New York and Newport, Rhode Island. Edith's creativity and talent soon became obvious: By the age of eighteen she had written a novella, (as well as witty reviews of it) and published poetry in the Atlantic Monthly.

After a failed engagement, Edith married a wealthy sportsman, Edward Wharton. Despite similar backgrounds and a shared taste for travel, the marriage was not a success. Many of Wharton's novels chronicle unhappy marriages, in which the demands of love and vocation often conflict with the expectations of society. Wharton's first major novel, The House of Mirth, published in 1905, enjoyed considerable Literary Success. Ethan Frome appeared six years later, solidifying Wharton's reputation as an important novelist. Often in the company of her close friend, Henry James, Wharton mingled with some of the most famous writers and artists of the day, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, André Gide, Sinclair Lewis, Jean Cocteau, and Jack London.

In 1913 Edith divorced Edward. She lived mostly in France for the remainder of her life. When World War I broke out, she organized hostels for refugees, worked as a fund-raiser, and wrote for American publications from battlefield frontlines. She was awarded the French Legion of Honor for her courage and distinguished work.

The Age of Innocence, a novel about New York in the 1870s, earned Wharton the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1921 -- the first time the award had been bestowed upon a woman. Wharton traveled throughout Europe to encourage young authors. She also continued to write, lying in her bed every morning, as she had always done, dropping each newly penned page on the floor to be collected and arranged when she was finished. Wharton suffered a stroke and died on August 11, 1937. She is buried in the American Cemetery in Versailles, France.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The Age of Innocence.

Good To Know

Upon the publication of The House of Mirth in 1905, Wharton became an instant celebrity, and the the book was an instant bestseller, with 80,000 copies ordered from Scribner's six weeks after its release.

Wharton had a great fondness for dogs, and owned several throughout her life.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Edith Newbold Jones Wharton (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 24, 1862
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Death:
      August 11, 1937
    2. Place of Death:
      Saint-Brice-sous-ForĂȘt, France

Customer Reviews

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( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2012

    Awesome

    I love this story so much!I laughed out loud at Lincoln and Olly xD

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    L

    Yippee!!! I wonder what happens in the end... does Terrin go with Ky or Mayson? Or mabye even someone else, like Adrian or Quinn? Can't wait to find out what happens next!! And sure you can name someone "Ep", since I did "Ferinzer" like "Rinzer". I didn't realize I had copied untill I was reading another chapter of Duantless. Oops! But "Ferinzer" kind of just stuck, so is it okay if I keep it??? And I'm thinking about reworking the "Trial of Shadow" a bit. Thanks for your input!
    ~ Fan and Author

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2012

    Dauntless

    Chapter Sixteen
    "Ky!" I shout. In two bounds, I'm in his arms. He spins me around, laughing.
    "Stop calling me Ky." He says, but he doesn't sound angry. His name is Zander Kyrohne, but Ky was a nickname when we were kids. I understand why he doesn't want to be known as "Ky." Our childhood is behind us. The safety of Cedarside is gone, and reality has hit us—full-force. Zanderr looks exactly like the ancient natives of the long-gone country of Asia, which we had learned about in history class at school. His blackish-brown hair glints in the sunlight.
    Ranelle hugs Zander, and Lincoln gives him a high-five.
    We head to the dining hall. Ranelle is telling Zander about Data Retrieval, and Mrs. Omlo, and Lincoln chimes in now and then. I zone out, looking around at people who pass by.
    "Cartha!" A voice calls. I look over my shoulder, wondering WHO would talk to that jerk.
    Mayson is jogging over to her little group, and her name is on his lips. I turn away, but not before spotting a mane of red hair in the crowd. "Allaster!" I call. She and Olly push through the crowd to join us. After introducing everyone, I explain that we're headed to lunch.
    "We all have training for the rest of the day." Allaster says. "Everyone does, until dinner."
    "I can't wait for tonight!" Ranelle says.
    "Why? You got a date?" I ask, grinning.
    "No! They're throwing a huge party tonight! In the dining hall! Oh, we HAVE to go dress-shopping!" Ranelle replies.
    Allaster and I exchange a glance.
    "Party. Sounds fun." Zander says.
    "My dress is gonna be SO hot!" Olly says. Lincoln snickers and says, "Mine's gonna be pink! And sparkly!"
    I laugh.
    When we reach the dining hall, it's very different. Tables hidden by white tablecloths line the walls. Only one has any food on it, though. It has sandwiches.
    "We're supposed to eat a small lunch, to save room for tonight." Ranelle says, then goes to get us all sandwiches.
    The dining hall is crowded, and a steady hum of talking, laughing, and shouting fills the air.
    "Cricket!" Someone yells. A light brown tabby cat stops in front of me, and stares at us with round green eyes.
    Someone slams into me. We both sprawl out on the ground. I sit up, and find myself facing a blond boy with shockingly blue eyes. He pulls off his glasses, cleans the lenses on the hem of his shirt, and shoves them back on.
    "Sorry." He says. "My cat—" he sees the cat, and picks it up, standing and offering me his free hand. I take it and let him haul me to my feet.
    "So, uh,—"
    "Ched. My name's Ched." The boy says. He looks about my age.
    "So, Ched, that's your cat?" I ask.
    "Yep. This is Cricket." He says. The cat gives a "Mrrow," that sounds like he's agreeing.
    Ranelle returns with sandwiches, and passes them out. Ched shakes his head when she offers to go get him one, saying he already ate.
    We wolf down lunch, and after we're through, we head to training. We stop by the boys' dorms so Ched can drop off Mickey. Then we walk to training. A nervous silence hangs in the air. I wonder what's on everyones' minds. Are they wondering about training, like me? I'm asking myself—if I could barely get through a simulation, which targets the mind, how will I handle a physical assessment?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2012

    Nabraska

    ~illumanati

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2012

    Dauntless

    Chapter One
    I wake up to the familuar sound of wailing.
    Another child lost.
    Ever since Fwen and his army of adults—strange, huh?—and monsters took over Tyrgia, kids have been joining the military on a daily basis. It's the easiest ticket out of here. The only other way to get out is to leave Tyrgia and head for Monly, the only close and free place. Which doing that takes months, weeks if you have a knack for going strong on weak legs and an emnpty stomach. You need tons of provisions and skills in camoflauge and hiding. Fwen's troops attack somewhere everyday, and Cedarside Way is lucky to still be free of the warlord's forces.
    My sister's bed, across from mine, is empty. I stand silently and search for some clothes to change into. I pull out a gray tank-top and black shorts. The shorts are EXTREMELY short, but they're in style, so my sister insists I wear them. I don't mind, really. They're comfortable.
    I tie my black sneakers with white laces and soles, then stand and search for my comb. It is on the floor nearby. I pick it up, stumble to the mirror, and run it through my hair. After that, I walk into the hall and to the kitchen.
    Ryde, my brother, is making breakfast from a rabbit.
    "Morning," I say, leaning against the doorframe.
    "Morning," He replies.
    "Where's Lark?" I ask.
    "You know where," He replies, nodding to the back door.
    I turn and walk to it because, really, I do know. The door opens to a cloudy gray morning, a grassy yard leading to a forest, and my sister on the porch.
    Ever since we recieved the letter saying that our mother was killed in the war, this is where Lark goes often. She just stands out looks out at the trees. I understand why, I suppose. The woods didn't change when our mother died. They still hum with life, continue living even though someone has stopped. It's so peaceful out here, without the heavy sorrow of a dead mother and a betraying father.
    Our father left when I was eight. Lark was three, and Ryde was ten. It was okay for us. He was rarely home, barely long enough to even be truly acknowledged. But he was our father. Only a month after he left, my mother went off to war, leaving my siblings and I in the care of an old but trusted woman with too many cats.
    "Lark," I say gently, stepping over to her. She turns, and again I'm shocked by how much alike we look. She has pale skin, impossibly long blond hair that falls in waves, blue-green eyes, and a slender build. Even though she's only eleven, she's very pretty, like my mother.
    "Yes?" She asks.
    "Good morning,"
    "Good morning," She answers. A loud meow makes us both turn. A black cat stares up at us. "Nym!" Lark sighs, picking up the cat and carrying it inside. I follow her, smelling breakfast and hearing Ryde talking to Rahla, the Cat Woman.
    We walk into the kitchen and sit at the table. Nym hops to the floor and pads off. A gray tabby cat leaps into my lap, mewing.
    "Hi, Rain." I say, scratching the bluish she-cat behind the ears. She purrs. When breakfast is on the table, I wolf it down and leave what's left on the floor. Rain meows and hurries over to finish it off.
    I walk to the front yard, and hear my siblings following.
    "You thinking about it?" Ryde asks me. "Going?"
    "To war?" I wonder aloud.
    "Yeah," He responds.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2012

    Darkness

    VERY COOL!!!! XD If you could include me... That would be absotootley fantastic. It sounds great and I can't wait to read more!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2012

    Tori-Forever maybe chapter 2 chapter one is at the fitst book

    This is um chapter two. That Awful night.
    It was the two of us. Young happy and together. We were walking down midvill and daisy rd. Not much happens in our small town of berrysdale. We were celabrateing five months together. We had just finished eatting d were going to see a concert. Biggest concert our littoe town has ever had. We had just ztarted walking when we were both yanked into a van. Both of us screamed and yelled. It was hopeless. The kidnapperd stRted to drive away. Blake held onto me untell the last moment. The car stopped and the back doors opened. The guys faces clear. The first one had brown hir kinda shaggy and looked about 26. The other guy was fater and was bald looked around 27. The pried us apart. Screaming and kicking i was forced to the ground. He had been put in a head lock. Makeing blake watch everything they painfully raped me. Even to this day i feel the pain. After they were done. They through my bloody broken beaten body to the side. They pulled out a small hand gun. And pointed it and me. Blake screamed at me to run and i did. Getting a bullet through my shoulder. Than there was the final gun shot and nothing. I ran into town screaming for help. Crying so hard i couldnt breath. People stopped anx i ran to the police station. They took me out to the spot where it all happened. I ran out of the car to find blake cold lifeless body. I ran up and pulled him to me a bullet hole through the head. The cops had to lift and carry me away. I fell asleep in the cruser with horable nightmares. I woke up to find im ib the hospitle.... end of chapter

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2012

    FOR BOOKS WRITTEN BY CHATTERS!

    Xavier

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