Against a Tide of Evil

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Overview

The former head of the United Nations in Sudan reveals for the first time the shocking depths of evil plumbed by those in Khartoum who designed and orchestrated 'the final solution in Darfur'

Against A Tide of Evil

How One Man Became the Whistleblower to the

First Mass Murder of the Twenty-First Century

By ...

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Against a Tide of Evil

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Overview

The former head of the United Nations in Sudan reveals for the first time the shocking depths of evil plumbed by those in Khartoum who designed and orchestrated 'the final solution in Darfur'

Against A Tide of Evil

How One Man Became the Whistleblower to the

First Mass Murder of the Twenty-First Century

By Dr. Mukesh Kapila

When darkness stalked the plains of Africa one man stood alone to face the evil . . .

In this no-holds-barred account, the former head of the United Nations in Sudan reveals for the first time the shocking depths of evil plumbed by those who designed and orchestrated 'the final solution' in Darfur. A veteran of humanitarian crisis and ethnic cleansing in Iraq, Rwanda, Srebrenica, Afghanistan and Sierra Leone, Dr Mukesh Kapila arrived in Sudan in March 2003 having made a promise to himself that if he were ever in a position to stop the mass-killers, they would never triumph on his watch. Against a Tide of Evil is a strident and passionate cri de coeur. It is the deeply personal account of one man driven to extreme action by the unwillingness of those in power to stop mass murder. It explores what empowers a man like Mukesh Kapila to stand up and be counted, and to act alone in the face of global indifference and venality. Kapila's story reads like a knife-edge international thriller as he uses all the powers at his disposal to bring to justice those responsible for the first mass murder of the twenty-first century - the Darfur genocide - and is finally forced to risk all and break every rule to do so.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780988968745
  • Publisher: Pegasus Books
  • Publication date: 4/19/2013
  • Pages: 280
  • Sales rank: 1,527,274
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.69 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    This memoir of Kapila's time as head of the UN in Sudan is bruta

    This memoir of Kapila's time as head of the UN in Sudan is brutal and tragic. It's also suspenseful and I stayed up late for several nights reading to see what would happen next. If you want to learn what happened in Darfur through the story of one man's involvement in that horrible mess, this book is for you. I was left, though, still wondering why it all happened. From this account, it seems the government in Khartoum decided to kill thousands of people and drive them from their homes simply because they were black, which is possible, but I suspect there must also have been political or economic reasons.

    I finished the book disgusted with the world's response to Darfur -- and especially with the United Nations. It left me puzzling over an organizational culture that apparently thought the right thing to do about the Khartoum-sponsored mass murders and mass rapes and mass displacements in Darfur was to keep quiet to avoid offending Khartoum. I can't see how this could ever be justified, but then I'm a journalist and therefore biased toward making things public. In any case, I'm glad Mukesh Kapila broke the code and alerted the press to what was going on.

    Unfortunately, it sounds like all the publicity -- and the UN Security Council action and International Criminal Court indictments of Khartoum leaders -- that followed hasn't stopped the killing in Sudan. Maybe the people involved in raising awareness about Khartoum's crimes and providing succor for Khartoum's victims should instead (or also) be raising money to quietly hire a Blackwater-like military contractor to enforce no-fly zones in the parts of Sudan that Khartoum continues to brutalize. And perhaps provide arms and training to the anti-Khartoum forces in those areas so they can defend themselves. Sure, it'd be illegal, but who's going to oppose it with more than just angry rhetoric?

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