Agapanthus Hum and the Eyeglasses

Agapanthus Hum and the Eyeglasses

by Joy Cowley, Jennifer Plecas
     
 

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Agapanthus Hum is a whirlwind. She hums, she cartwheels, and she is always running around. Now that Agapanthus has eyeglasses, her parents want her to be careful. Agapanthus tries to slow down; she even wears a bag on her head so her glasses won't get lost, but more often then not, her glasses go flying. What do grown-up acrobats do with their eyeglasses?

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Overview

Agapanthus Hum is a whirlwind. She hums, she cartwheels, and she is always running around. Now that Agapanthus has eyeglasses, her parents want her to be careful. Agapanthus tries to slow down; she even wears a bag on her head so her glasses won't get lost, but more often then not, her glasses go flying. What do grown-up acrobats do with their eyeglasses? Agapanthus's parents bring her to a performance so that she can find out.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Agapanthus Hum, the altogether winning heroine of Cowley's (Mrs. Wishy Washy) spunky chapter book, has an exuberance befitting her name: "she was called Hum because she was such a whizzer, humming and whizzing like a button on a string." Her rushing, twirling and cartwheeling, however, sometimes results in minor accidents and often spells trouble for her eyeglasses, which fall off and get bent and twisted. Though they warn her to be cautious, Agapanthus's parents encourage their daughter's acrobatics and also treat her to a trip to the circus, where Agapanthus is in awe of the trapeze artist ("I am going to do that," she announces). Cowley's tale features playful language, characters that have their quirks yet stay believable, and a fun-to-read pace that is sure to keep beginning readers entertained as well as a bit challenged. Plecas (Rattlebone Rock) plays up the text's sweet-natured humor with her springy-limbed heroine, who indeed looks as if she can barely contain her energy; and with the introduction of a busy little dog, a constant companion that is Agapanthus's equal when it comes to childlike glee. Ages 5-8. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. —This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
Children's Literature - Melinda Medley Sprinkle
To say the least, Agapanthus is a very active young girl. On any given day, she will be found hand-standing, running, jumping, and cartwheeling through the air. There is only one problem! When she goes sailing, so do her eyeglasses. She tries everything to keep them on her face where they belong. She even puts a bag over her head to keep her glasses from falling off, but nothing seems to work. Her Mommy and Daddy try to help by taking her to an acrobat show to find out what the real acrobats do to keep their eyeglasses on. Agapanthus is extremely excited about the show because she wants to become an acrobat when she grows up. While there, Agapanthus eats ice cream, sees acrobats on the teeter-totter, and a lady acrobat on the flying trapeze. She truly has a lovely time. When they leave, she sees the lady acrobat again, and guess what? She's now wearing glasses. In the end, Agapanthus learns what she knew all along. The only thing she needed to do was take her glasses off. A wonderful little book for a family to share together.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-The text of this beginning chapter book races along just like its main character. Agapanthus Hum is a bundle of energy with "...tunes inside her, tunes for running and whirling, tunes for dancing in the wind...." Because she is always "humming and whizzing" and tumbling with acrobatic abandon, accidents often happen and her glasses swing, slip, and drop, and are constantly in need of repair. When her understanding (and comically exaggerated) parents, "good little Mommy" and "good little Daddy," take her to a show, they discover how a real gymnast saves her glasses. Unlike many books for newly independent readers, Cowley's word choices provide readers with interesting images-"tunes that bubbled toothpaste and gurgled lemonade," "her hum puffed out like a birthday candle," "beads went everywhere, like blue hailstones," etc. Plecas's illustrations extend the humor and reinforce the seven-chapter text. There is at least one Agapanthus Hum in every classroom and that child is waiting for this delightful book.-Gale W. Sherman, Pocatello Public Library, ID
Kirkus Reviews
Agapanthus Hum is always in motion, a packet of energy who also happens to wear glasses, which cause her no end of trouble. When she smothers her parents—called good little Daddy and good little Mommy—with kisses, her glasses come off and swing from one ear. When doing a handstand, the glasses drop off entirely and get crushed when Agapanthus crashes down upon them: "Her hum puffed out like a birthday candle, and her head went quiet," but only briefly. Her parents are sweet and kind and utterly forgiving (absurdly so, as Cowley makes clear) and mention that she is one fine acrobat all the same. The ultimate solution is for good little Mommy to hold Agapanthus's glasses during practice. When Agapanthus attends an acrobat show and learns that at least one professional acrobat who wears glasses gives them to her mother when she performs, one little girl's fate is sealed. This story is just like Agapanthus, full of beans, song, and heart; she's so disarming in both text and Plecas's comic illustrations that readers will hope for an encore. (Picture book. 5-8) .

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780448464770
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
05/16/2013
Series:
Penguin Young Readers Level 3 Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
570,907
Product dimensions:
6.18(w) x 8.82(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
570L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Agapanthus Hum, the altogether winning heroine of Cowley's (Mrs. Wishy Washy) spunky chapter book, has an exuberance befitting her name: "she was called Hum because she was such a whizzer, humming and whizzing like a button on a string." Her rushing, twirling and cartwheeling, however, sometimes results in minor accidents and often spells trouble for her eyeglasses, which fall off and get bent and twisted. Though they warn her to be cautious, Agapanthus's parents encourage their daughter's acrobatics and also treat her to a trip to the circus, where Agapanthus is in awe of the trapeze artist ("I am going to do that," she announces). Cowley's tale features playful language, characters that have their quirks yet stay believable, and a fun-to-read pace that is sure to keep beginning readers entertained as well as a bit challenged. Plecas (Rattlebone Rock) plays up the text's sweet-natured humor with her springy-limbed heroine, who indeed looks as if she can barely contain her energy; and with the introduction of a busy little dog, a constant companion that is Agapanthus's equal when it comes to childlike glee. Ages 5-8. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. —This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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