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Agatha Raisin and the Day the Floods Came (Agatha Raisin Series #12)
     

Agatha Raisin and the Day the Floods Came (Agatha Raisin Series #12)

4.3 13
by M. C. Beaton, Penelope Keith (Read by)
 

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Crankier than ever, Agatha Raisin wants to forget that her husband left her to enter a monastery-a turn of affairs more humiliating than when she caught him with a mistress. She feels abandoned, fat, frumpy, and absolutely furious. What are her options? She takes an island vacation and joins a Pilates class. But what finally lifts her spirits is finding a corpse. The

Overview

Crankier than ever, Agatha Raisin wants to forget that her husband left her to enter a monastery-a turn of affairs more humiliating than when she caught him with a mistress. She feels abandoned, fat, frumpy, and absolutely furious. What are her options? She takes an island vacation and joins a Pilates class. But what finally lifts her spirits is finding a corpse. The dead girl was a member of Agatha's exercise class, afloat in a rain-swollen river, dressed in a bridal gown, and clutching a wedding bouquet. Agatha's policeman friend Bill Wong suggests she leave this macabre murder to the Worcester CID. Pah! What do they know? Once she enlists the aid of the bachelor mystery writer next door, puts on a disguise, and interviews some likely suspects, Agatha will be her brash, redoubtable self again-unless she becomes the killer's next victim first ...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Tetchy Agatha Raisin's attempt at a little R&R in the wake of her beloved husband's defection to a French monastery gets her revved up for another mystery when she hears that a fellow vacationer was murdered. The real story in M.C. Beaton's Agatha Raisin and the Day the Floods Came takes place upon Agatha's return to her Cotswold home, when she learns of a young woman's apparent suicide and decides to investigate with the aid of her new neighbor, the dashing, cultured and vaguely lascivious writer John Armitage, and her own surprising flair for deceit and disguise. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Poor Agatha is still ensconced in her Carsely village cottage, but now at the end of her short-lived marriage to next-door neighbor James Lacey (Agatha Raisin and the Love from Hell, 2001), who's left her to take holy orders at a French monastery. Her longtime friend and confidant Charles Fraith is also living in France following his marriage to a young Frenchwoman. Even after a trip to an island off the coast of Chile and the arrival of novelist John Armitage at the cottage once occupied by Lacey, Agatha finds her spirits low. Luckily, there's the tonic murder of young Kylie Stokes, whose body, found floating in the river at nearby Evesham, rouses Agatha's interest, especially after her detective friend Bill Wong informs her that Kylie had died of a drug overdose but that her body had been frozen after death. Kylie's fiance, Zak Jensen, whose father owns the local disco, claims that Kylie had been addicted but had quit. Decked out in blond wig and glasses, supposedly gathering material for a TV program on youth in the provinces, Agatha proceeds to nose around Kylie's co-workers, friends, and family. She's joined intermittently by neighbor Armitage, now her buddy, and manages to irritate Police Chief John Brudge thoroughly before another death and her own narrow escape lead to the killer. The latest installment in this long-running series is as flaccid and downbeat as its heroine, with a puzzle barely intriguing enough to pull the reader to the finish. Lighten up, Agatha.
From the Publisher

“The Agatha Raisin stories are always well plotted but the real attraction is the quirky characters of Agatha, Sir Charles, and James--fans will be thrilled to catch up with the titanic trio.” —RT Book Reviews

“Beaton's Agatha Raisin series...just about defines the British cozy.” —Booklist

“A true village mystery with a heroine so timely and real, you'll want to meet her at the pub.” —St. Petersburg Times

“Funny, breezy, and very enjoyable.” —Midwest Book Review

“[Agatha] is a glorious cross between Miss Marple, Auntie Mame, and Lucille Ball, with a tad of pit bull tossed in. She's wonderful.” —St. Petersburg Times

“Anyone interested in a few hours' worth of intelligent, amusing reading will want to make the acquaintance of Mrs. Agatha Raisin.” —Atlanta Journal Constitution

“Few things in life are more satisfying than to discover a brand new Agatha Raisin mystery.” —Tampa Tribune Times

“Beaton has a winner in the irrepressible, romance-hungry Agatha.” —Chicago Sun-Times

“The Miss Marple-like Raisin is a refreshingly sensible, wonderfully eccentric, thoroughly likable heroine...a must for cozy fans.” —Booklist

“Anyone interested in intelligent, amusing reading will want to make the acquaintance of Mrs. Agatha Raisin.” —Atlanta Journal Constitution

“The Raisin series brings the cozy tradition back to life. God bless the Queen!” —Tulsa World

“[Beaton's] imperfect heroine is an absolute gem!” —Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781504701150
Publisher:
Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2016
Series:
Agatha Raisin Series , #12
Edition description:
Unabridged
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 5.70(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

Penelope Keith is a narrator and an award-winning actress who is best known for her roles in To the Manor Born and The Good Life, but she has appeared in many other television programs, including No Job for a Lady and Law and Disorder. Her theater performances include The Norman Conquests, Hay Fever, and Mrs. Warren's Profession. She has received several BAFTA Awards and in 2014 was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

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Agatha Raisin and the Day the Floods Came (Agatha Raisin Series #12) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think MC Beaton went sleepwalking through this one. Most of the usual fun characters are here, but for some reason Agatha is the least fun of all. Perhaps because she is mourning the loss of James? But I miss antics such as those in earlier books - particularly her ruses in trying to win village competitions. The light-heartedness just wasn't quite there this time. And, while I am accustomed to Beaton's simplified style, I felt in this one she was REALLY gearing it to a fifth-grade reading level! A few more three-syllable words, MC - our intelligence won't be challenged!
Guest More than 1 year ago
After having read several of these Agatha Raisin books, this one is THE best! Agatha goes on holiday to rid her troubling mind of James Lacey, who has recently divorced her and joined the monastery. Agatha returns home and gets herself involved in another murder investigation. Ther is a new tenant in James Lacey's house and the plot thickens. Try it ~ you'll certainly find it entertaining.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It would take a team of horses to get me to not puchase Agatha's latest book adventures. I really enjoy this fisty lady. I did note that Agatha is not up to her perky self in this lastest book. I think that I have the remedy for Agatha's down state of mind. She goes to see a therapist, a handsome male therapist, and she gets her sassy self back in shape. Course, murder will happen.....who??? that's up to M. C. Beaton :)
Anonymous 9 months ago
M. C. has added a great series to cosy mystery fans everywhere
Fe More than 1 year ago
This is one enjoyable mystery series. Light, fun reading with a murder or two thrown it.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Agatha is back in her funny and enjoyable way with this outing. She is on her own finally. James has joined a monastery and Sir Charles has married a French woman. The book starts with her on a holiday on an island off Chile's coastline where she meets a wonderful Spanish family, and she finds that they become good friends. But then she must go home, and sure enough there is another murder in nearby Evesham. They have a huge spring flood and Agatha is standing on a bridge watching the rushing water and she sees the body of a young girl floating face up in the water. She's wearing a bridal gown and holding a bouquet. Agatha is sure she's been murdered so she sets out on her own to discover the killer. In the meantime she teams up with her new neighbour, John, a writer who bought James' cottage. He's an attractive divorcee, but Agatha is determined not to get involved romantically with him. She again finds herself in danger as she tries to unearth the killer. This is a really funny little story, and I enjoyed it very much.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Agatha Raisin is in a deep funk. The man she loved, cherished after and finally married is divorcing her to become a monk in a French monastery. Her good friend Sir Charles is no longer available to keep her company because he married a French woman who is pregnant with twins. Her spirits are lifted when she finds the body of a bride in a wedding gown floating down the river.

She decides that since the police ruled the case a homicide she would solve it before the authorities do. Helping her is her new neighbor, crime writer John Armitage. While interviewing individuals connected to the victim, Agatha discovers the dead woman was a cunning, cold and manipulative person who was black mailing some people. While trying to figure out who that someone is, two attempts are made on her life before she finally figures it out and by then it is almost too late.

Agatha Raisin, a cranky, crude and raunchy woman somehow (and this reviewer doesn¿t have a clue) manages to warm her way into the reader¿s heart and elicit their sympathy. The latest installment in this long running series is funny, breezy and very enjoyable. Though the heroine has not changed an iota from the first tale, M.C. Beaton has written another winner.

Harriet Klausner