The Age of Caricature: Satirical Prints in the Reign of George III

The Age of Caricature: Satirical Prints in the Reign of George III

by Diana Donald, Daian Donald
     
 

ISBN-10: 0300071787

ISBN-13: 9780300071788

Pub. Date: 02/28/1998

Publisher: Yale University Press

The late eighteenth century in England was the first great age of cartooning, and English caricature prints of the period have long been enjoyed for their humor and vitality. Diana Donald presents the first major study of these caricatures, showing that they were a widely disseminated form of political expression and propaganda as subtle and elegant as the written

Overview

The late eighteenth century in England was the first great age of cartooning, and English caricature prints of the period have long been enjoyed for their humor and vitality. Diana Donald presents the first major study of these caricatures, showing that they were a widely disseminated form of political expression and propaganda as subtle and elegant as the written word.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780300071788
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Publication date:
02/28/1998
Series:
The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Laughing Audience 1(2)
The caricature print trade in the reign of George III
2(7)
The roots of Georgian caricature
9(6)
The 'sphere of decorum': Social attitudes to caricature
15(4)
The distribution of satirical prints
19(3)
'The Miserable Tribe of Party Etchers'
22(22)
Introduction: The historical enigma
22(1)
The satirist as hireling
23(4)
High art, low art and the low artist
27(4)
New ideals of satire
31(1)
Hogarth and the social caricaturists
32(4)
Gillray's commentators and critics
36(5)
The 'melancholy lesson' of Gillray
41(3)
Wit and Emblem: The Language of Political Prints
44(31)
Rejection of the emblematic tradition in eighteenth-century polite culture
44(2)
Modern accounts of the 'progress' of satire
46(1)
Emblem and caricature in earlier eighteenth-century satire
47(3)
'Wilkes and Liberty': A new satirical language
50(5)
Wilkesite prints and political ritual
55(1)
Emblematic forms as the language of the common people
56(2)
Political crisis and the climax of Wilkesite propaganda
58(2)
The reform of political satire in the 1780s
60(5)
The new style of satire and political rhetoric
65(1)
The influence of antiquity
66(1)
Parody and burlesque
67(6)
The triumph of polite culture
73(2)
'Struggles for Happiness': The Fashionable World
75(34)
The world, the flesh and the devil
75(3)
Luxury and the fate of the nation
78(7)
Concepts of fashion
85(8)
The social concourse: Manners and morality
93(5)
Aristocracy under attack: The revolutionary era
98(11)
The Crowd in Caricature: 'A Picture of England'?
109(33)
'Here Tyranny ne'er Lifts her purple Hand': The crowd in the street
112(3)
'Billingsgate Triumphant': Street sellers as a popular symbol
115(3)
The political crowd before 1789
118(12)
France and England: Rowlandson's social panoramas
130(9)
The decline of an eighteenth-century genre
139(3)
'John Bull bother'd: The French Revolution and the Propaganda War of the 1790s
142(42)
First rections to the French Revolution
143(3)
'Mr Chairman Reeves says, that they will not only prosecute, but they will not only prosecute, but they will convince men'
146(11)
John Bull: The problem of 'the people'
157(5)
Presages of the millennium: the reaction to Pitt's 'Terror'
162(4)
'Treasons in Embryo': The vilification of the Opposition Whigs
166(8)
'The pen and pencil must assist each other:' The crisis of 1798
174(6)
The London Corresponding Society alarmed: The demise of 1790s radicalism
180(4)
Epilogue: Peterloo and the End of the Georgian Tradition in Satire 184(15)
Notes 199(45)
Index 244

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