Age of consent P by Geoffrey Wolff, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Age of consent P

Age of consent P

by Geoffrey Wolff
     
 

Ted and Maisie's parents moved to the community of Blackberry Mountain in upstate New York full of hope for the future; they would live a wholesome life rooted in the natural world, free from social constraints and the ugly urban climate of the early seventies. But all this changes when Maisie, age fifteen, stands poised at the top of a waterfall on the 4th of July

Overview

Ted and Maisie's parents moved to the community of Blackberry Mountain in upstate New York full of hope for the future; they would live a wholesome life rooted in the natural world, free from social constraints and the ugly urban climate of the early seventies. But all this changes when Maisie, age fifteen, stands poised at the top of a waterfall on the 4th of July and looks down over her family and friends before plunging headfirst into the shallow pool, doing herself injuries that will mark them all forever.

"The sins of parents are visited on their children in this superb new novel. . . a stinging social and cultural portrait of a time, a place and a generation whose highflown ideals masked a weak moral fiber.. . . While he is writing about the death of dreams, he provides a satisfying ending that is a healthy antidote to much current fiction in which cynicism triumphs over faith and moral turpitude over justice."

Editorial Reviews

Stephen Stark
Splendid...a lovely piece of work, full of the complexities of human affairs. —The Houston Chronicle
Deirdre Donahue
A deeply disturbing yet exquisitely written novel.
USA Today
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The sins of parents are visited on their children in this superb new novel by the author of The Final Club and the nonfiction The Duke of Deception. This is a stinging social and cultural portrait of a time, a place and a generation whose highflown ideals masked a weak moral fiber. The idyllic community of Blackberry Mountain in the New York Adirondacks was founded in the 1960s by charismatic Doc Halliday, who then lured other counterculture refugees from middle-class conformity. Among those who followed him were Ann and Jinx Jenks and their children Maisie and Ted. Jinx and Doc were roommates at Columbia, and three decades later Jinx is still mesmerized by his friend's easy bonhomie and reckless enthusiasm; Jinx is Doc's echo, henchman, puppet. Doc, a merry prankster whose can-do attitude always exceeds his unabashed failure to follow through, retains the Jenks family's slavish devotion and their cooperation in his pie-in-the-sky projects; he serves as avuncular mentor to Maisie and Ted, who adore him. When Maisie-a beautiful, plucky, irreverent 15-year-old-hurls herself from a high rock into a shallow pool one Independence Day, the facade of her family's happiness is irreparably damaged. For, as we gradually learn, the monstrously egotistic Doc is an amoral debaucher of young women, and Maisie is not his only victim. Among the satisfactions of this impeccably fashioned narrative is Wolff's skill at conveying the nuances of small-town life in a purportedly close-knit community in which some people will always be considered outsiders by the natives. Wolff engages thorny issues within a terse but dramatic narrative framework, utilizing a fine-tuned irony in the service of character development. While he is writing about the death of dreams, he provides a satisfying ending that is a healthy antidote to much current fiction in which cynicism triumphs over faith and moral turpitude over justice.
Library Journal
In her 15th summer, Maisie Jenks suddenly leaps from a rocky ledge during the family's Independence Day picnic, critically injuring herself and forever altering her family's lives. After she recovers, she will not reveal her motives, leaving her younger brother, Ted, to spend the next 10 years struggling to make sense of her act. His search for understanding leads him to discover dark, unsuspected secrets about his family; Doc Halliday, an admired family friend; and Blackberry Hill, their utopian, countercultural community. Although exploring issues of incest and sexual abuse, Wolff (A Day at the Beach) treats these potentially sensational topics in a sensitive, low-key manner in this novel about the underside of idealism and the damage done when freedom becomes license. -- Lawrence Rungren, Bedford Free Public Library
Michiko Kakutani
A highly compelling drama...Wolff succeexds in combining the psychological subtlety that Henry James pioneered in his novels with the stark fable-like symbolism he so often employed in his shorter tales. -- The New York Times
NY Times Book Review
A thoughtful exploration of the damage done in the name of love.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312140816
Publisher:
Picador
Publication date:
02/15/1996
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.24(h) x 0.64(d)

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