The Age of Shiva

The Age of Shiva

3.7 11
by Manil Suri, Josephine Bailey
     
 

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Following his spectacular debut novel, The Death of Vishnu, Manil Suri returns with a mesmerizing story of modern India, richly layered with themes from Hindu mythology. The Age of Shiva is at once a powerful story of a country in turmoil and an extraordinary portrait of maternal love.

Meera, the narrator, is seventeen years old when she catches her

Overview

Following his spectacular debut novel, The Death of Vishnu, Manil Suri returns with a mesmerizing story of modern India, richly layered with themes from Hindu mythology. The Age of Shiva is at once a powerful story of a country in turmoil and an extraordinary portrait of maternal love.

Meera, the narrator, is seventeen years old when she catches her first glimpse of Dev, performing a song so infused with passion that it arouses in her the first flush of erotic longing. She wonders if she can steal him away from Roopa, her older, more beautiful sister, who has brought her along to see him.

When Meera's reverie comes true, it does not lead to the fairy-tale marriage she imagined. She escapes her overbearing father only to find herself thrust into the male-dominated landscape of India after independence. Dev's family is orthodox and domineering, his physical demands oppressive. His brother Arya lusts after her with the same intensity that fuels his right-wing politics. Although Meera develops an unexpected affinity with her sister-in-law Sandhya, the tenderness they share is as heartbreaking as it is fleeting.

It is only when her son is born that Meera begins to imagine a life of fulfillment. She engulfs him with a love so deep, so overpowering, that she must fear its consequences.

Meera's unforgettable story, embodying Shiva as a symbol of religious upheaval, places The Age of Shiva among the most compelling novels to emerge from contemporary India.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The second novel from Suri (The Death of Vishnu) follows Meera Sawhney from her unhappy 1950s marriage to aspiring singer Dev Arora through to her own son's coming-of-age. After an impulsive act forces Meera's marriage at 17, her complex, controlling father decries her tying herself (and, by extension, her family) to the provincial, lower-class Aroras. Meera soon finds herself pulled in different directions by her in-laws' religious orthodoxy, her father's progressivism (which doesn't run deep), her husband's self-pitying alcoholism and her own resentment. She finds salvation in the birth of a son, Ashvin; mother love, which Suri describes in intensely physical terms, gives her life passion and purpose, and overwhelms her adult relationships. But as India modernizes, Meera senses that Ashvin, and she herself, must live their own lives. Suri renders Meera's perspective marvelously, especially in small particulars (such as Meera's deliberations around the cutting of Ashvin's hair) and in the perils and conflicts Meera faces in her relationships with men. He also takes a close look at Hindu practices and charts the rise of religious nationalism in the years following Gandhi's death. Suri's vivid portrait of a woman in post-independence India engages timeless themes of self-determination. (Feb.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

This second novel in a proposed trilogy is not really a sequel to Suri's first, the 2002 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Award-winning The Death of Vishnu, although it, too, is set in a Bombay apartment building. Obsessive love is the theme, and Suri once again displays a fine touch for details. Meera, living in 1960s Bombay, is a headstrong 17-year-old girl whose impulsiveness leads her into a troubled marriage with Dev, a charming singer. But Dev never quite makes it in the Bombay music business and soon starts drinking heavily. In conflict not only with her husband but also with her autocratic father, Meera channels all her love toward her young son, Ashvin. As the boy grows up, Meera's maternal devotion turns suffocating and claustrophobic. Non-Indian readers will be able to relate to the family dynamics here, but a passing knowledge of Indian customs and recent history, especially during Indira Gandhi's four-term rule as prime minister (1966-77; 1980-84), would be helpful. Recommended. [See Prepub Alert, LJ9/1/07.]
—Leslie Patterson

School Library Journal

The second novel from Suri (The Death of Vishnu) follows Meera Sawhney from her unhappy 1950s marriage to aspiring singer Dev Arora through to her own son's coming-of-age. After an impulsive act forces Meera's marriage at 17, her complex, controlling father decries her tying herself (and, by extension, her family) to the provincial, lower-class Aroras. Meera soon finds herself pulled in different directions by her in-laws' religious orthodoxy, her father's progressivism (which doesn't run deep), her husband's self-pitying alcoholism and her own resentment. She finds salvation in the birth of a son, Ashvin; mother love, which Suri describes in intensely physical terms, gives her life passion and purpose, and overwhelms her adult relationships. But as India modernizes, Meera senses that Ashvin, and she herself, must live their own lives. Suri renders Meera's perspective marvelously, especially in small particulars (such as Meera's deliberations around the cutting of Ashvin's hair) and in the perils and conflicts Meera faces in her relationships with men. He also takes a close look at Hindu practices and charts the rise of religious nationalism in the years following Gandhi's death. Suri's vivid portrait of a woman in post-independence India engages timeless themes of self-determination. (Feb.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
From the Publisher
"A finely conceived, absorbing and powerful book." —Kirkus Starred Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781400106219
Publisher:
Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date:
03/01/2008
Edition description:
Unabridged, 14 CDs, 17 hrs. 30 min.
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 5.50(h) x 1.10(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"A finely conceived, absorbing and powerful book." —-Kirkus Starred Review

Meet the Author

British actress and narrator Josephine Bailey has won ten AudioFile Earphones Awards and a prestigious Audie Award, and Publishers Weekly named her Best Female Narrator in 2002.

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Age of Shiva 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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montana-gal More than 1 year ago
A wonderfully complex story of an independent woman in post Independence period in India, her good choices and her bad choices, and her devotion to her son. Beautifully interwoven characters and stories. Manil Suri is a writer i would always trust to tell a great story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Wonderful writing, but I guess I was left dissatisfied with the ending.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Well written and captivating!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a patchwork of Indian stereotypes, but without subtlety. The book is a self-conscious effort to become the definitive post-colonial novel with perhaps an eye to a movie script. I thought it was tedious. Pity, because Suri is, otherwise, a good writer. Try Amitav Ghosh if you want the real deal.