Agency and Joint Attention

Overview

Human infants do not seem to be born with concepts of self or joint attention. One basic goal of Agency and Joint Attention is to unravel how these abilities originate. One approach that has received a lot of recent attention is social. Some argue that by virtue of an infant's intense eye gaze with her mother, she is able, by the age of four months, to establish a relationship with her mother that differentiates between "me" and "you." At about twelve months, the infant acquires the non-verbal ability to share ...

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Overview

Human infants do not seem to be born with concepts of self or joint attention. One basic goal of Agency and Joint Attention is to unravel how these abilities originate. One approach that has received a lot of recent attention is social. Some argue that by virtue of an infant's intense eye gaze with her mother, she is able, by the age of four months, to establish a relationship with her mother that differentiates between "me" and "you." At about twelve months, the infant acquires the non-verbal ability to share attention with her mother or other caregivers. Although the concepts of self and joint attention are nonverbal and uniquely human, the question remains, how do we establish metacognitive control of these abilities? A tangential question is whether nonhuman animals develop abilities that are analogous to self and joint attention.

Much of this volume is devoted to the development of metacognition of self and joint attention in experiments on the origin of consciousness, knowing oneself, social referencing, joint action, the neurological basis of joint attention, the role of joint action, mirror neurons, phenomenology, and cues for agency.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199988341
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 8/26/2013
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Janet Metcalfe, Betsy Sparrow and Herb TerraceAll at Department of Psychology, Columbia University

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Table of Contents

Contributors

Introduction
Herbert Terrace

Chapter 1
Becoming Human: Why Two Minds are Better Than One
Herbert S. Terrace

Chapter 2
How Joint Is The Joint Attention Of Apes And Human Infants?
Malinda Carpenter and Josep Call

Chapter 3
The Comparative Delusion: The 'Behavioristic'/ 'Mentalistic' Dichotomy in Comparative Theory Of Mind Research
Derek C. Penn and Daniel J. Povinelli

Chapter 4
Behavior-Reading Versus Mentalizing In Animals
Logan Fletcher and Peter Carruthers

Chapter 5
On Knowing and Being Known in the 4-Month Origins of Disorganized Attachment: An Emerging Presymbolic Theory Of Mind
Beatrice Beebe, Sara Markese, Lorraine Bahrick, Frank Lachmann, Karen Buck,
Henian Chen, Patricia Cohen, Howard Andrews, and Joseph Jaffe

Chapter 6
Gaze Following And Agency In Human Infancy
Andrew N. Meltzoff and Rechele Brooks

Chapter 7
Ostensive Communication and Cultural Learning: The Natural Pedagogy Hypothesis
György Gergely

Chapter 8
Embodied Attention in Infant Pointing
Fabia Franco

Chapter 9
Understanding the Structure of Communicative Interactions in Infancy
Athena Vouloumanos and Kristine H. Onishi
Chapter 10
Cognition in Action: A New Look at the Cortical Motor System
Vittorio Gallese and Corrado Sinigaglia

Chapter 10
Early Sensitivity to Emotion Cues - Precursors of Social Referencing?
Stefanie Hoehl

Chapter 11
Linking Joint Attention and Joint Action
Anne Böckler and Natalie Sebanz

Chapter 12
Do You See What I See? The Neural Bases of Joint Attention
Elizabeth Redcay and Rebecca Saxe

Chapter 12
Linking Joint Attention and Joint Action
Anne Böckler and Natalie Sebanz

Chapter 14
'Knowing' That the Self is the Agent
Janet Metcalfe

Chapter 15
Cues To Agency: Time Can Tell
Robrecht Van Der Wel and Günther Knoblich

Chapter 16
The Meaning of Actions: Crosstalk between Procedural and Declarative Action Knowledge
Wolfgang Prinz, Christiane Diefenbach, and Anne Springer

Chapter 17
The Three Pillars of Volition: Phenomenal States, Ideomotor Processing, and The Skeletal Muscle System
Ezequiel Morsella Tanaz Molapour, and Margaret T. Lynn

Chapter 18
The Function of Consciousness in Controlling Behavior
Sara Steele and Hakwan Lau

Chapter 19
Sense of Agency: Many Facets, Multiple Sources
Elisabeth Pacherie

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