Agents of Innocence

Agents of Innocence

3.7 11
by David Ignatius
     
 

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Now back in print: the "superlative spy novel" (New York Times) by the author of the red-hot forthcoming thriller A Firing Offense. A national bestseller in its hardcover edition, Agents of Innocence is the book that established David Ignatius's reputation as a master of the novel of contemporary espionage. Into the treacherous world of shifting alliances and arcane…  See more details below

Overview

Now back in print: the "superlative spy novel" (New York Times) by the author of the red-hot forthcoming thriller A Firing Offense. A national bestseller in its hardcover edition, Agents of Innocence is the book that established David Ignatius's reputation as a master of the novel of contemporary espionage. Into the treacherous world of shifting alliances and arcane subterfuge comes idealistic CIA man Tom Rogers. Ordered to penetrate the PLO and recruit a high-level operative, he soon learns the heavy price of innocence in a time and place that has no use for it.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A CIA agent ordered to penetrate the PLO finds his idealism tested. (Sept.)
Library Journal
The factional strife in Lebanon feeds on rumor, deliberate lies, and half-truths, and spawns mercenaries and agents of every ideological stripe. Most share a harsh morality that allows terrorism to advance. A very few others are committed to relationships built on trust, honesty, and a sense of mutual responsibility. One such is Tom Rogers, a CIA agent who penetrates a prime Palestinian unit and makes a secret agreement with a young deputy chief of Fatah intelligence. This first novel is a suspenseful account of the excruciating ambiguity of the undertaking. Ignatius, a former Middle East correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, writes with a fatalistic affection for his subject and deep understanding of its complexity. As a storyteller, Ignatius deploys drama, pace, and character to make this a spy novel of formidable power. Barbara Conaty, Library of Congress
Bob Woodward
An unparalleled and hauntingly accurate portrait of how the intelligence game is really played. -- The Washington Post
Time
“An uncommonly informative and intriguing espionage thriller.”
Los Angeles Times
“A first-rate achievement in the best tradition of Graham Greene.”
Stephen Grey - The Guardian
“One of the best of all American spy novels…It resonates with the fraught work of making clandestine contacts with today's murderous extremists.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517051597
Publisher:
Random House Value Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
04/28/1990

What People are saying about this

Bob Woodward
An unparalleled and hauntingly accurate portrait of how the intelligence game is really played.

Meet the Author

David Ignatius, best-selling author and prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post, has been covering the Middle East and the CIA for more than twenty-five years. He lives in Washington, DC.

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Agents of Innocence 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
RSRS More than 1 year ago
I read David Ignatius' 2007 book, Body of Lies, and was so impressed that I sought out his previous books. Even though Agents of Innocence was written over 20 years ago, it's still an excellent guide to the problems and political machinations in the Middle East Agents of Innocence reveals the factors that contributed to Lebanon's downfall; provides insights into how the CIA (and other spy services) works; and is a rollicking, good story about politics, spying, and terrorism. I had to special order this book, as it was not in stock, but it was well worth the wait.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm embarassed to confess a preference for reading that confirms my beliefs or suspicions. This excellent spy thriller confirms my personal opinion that peace in the Near and Middle East will continue to be beyond our reach as long as so many have so much invested in conflict. -- catwak
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book not knowing much about the Lebanon situation, and Beirut and places of that nature. I had an idea of how the CIA would operate and a general idea of the US tactics in dealing with other countries. This book did a good job of showing how intelligence is gathered, how surveillance is made and how groupthink and political brass often times blurs the dealings with other countries. I liked the main character, the intelligence officer Rogers, but then I question the authors development of Rogers because some of his actions went against what Ignatius orginally portrayed Rogers as. I enjoyed the Arab characters Fuad and Jamal, their views opened my eyes a bit more to how their people operate in their country and how they view the US. The pacing of this book could of been much better, as others have commented events in this book were predictable. I feel the storyline dragged on at many times and the end of the book was more of the climax in the last few pages. However Fuads reasoning for all the events in the end was on point and still applies today.
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4u1solo More than 1 year ago
As an aspiring author I bought this book based on the author's reputation, the genre and the need to check my own sense of "pacing" of a novel. I also was interested in character development, character details depth and rate of revelation. With Roger I felt I had a full sense of him at the onset. He performs in a creditable and predictable manner. What I came to expect with my years of federal service. The location descriptions were a bit brief but did gather up the unique flavor of Beirut that I feel I know.. I'm sure someone with no knowledge of conditions there would have a much better understanding of the way it was and the why of it. The spy part seems to be mixed too casually with the State Dept.s day to day affairs; and, to be sure, so closely wrapped into the American Embassy. It is a foregone that anything close to or associated with a countries Embassy will be suspect. I read it and I liked it. I really thought the best part was the Arab characters, their motivations and the ambivalence of life in the near east. Although this novel doesn't "say it" it does show the utter stupidity of the U.S. government decisions and processes which mix military with civil politics in a manner sure to result in almost casual military death and injury.
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