Aggie Gets Lost

Overview

Aggie and Ben are back with another adventure in three short chapters just right for beginning readers. Ben and Aggie are playing fetch in the park. When Ben throws too far, Aggie doesn't come back! Ben looks and looks, but he cannot find her. It is the worst day ever. Ben's sadness turns into determination as he retraces his steps, makes posters, and enlists other people to help turn Aggie from a lost pup to a found one.
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Overview

Aggie and Ben are back with another adventure in three short chapters just right for beginning readers. Ben and Aggie are playing fetch in the park. When Ben throws too far, Aggie doesn't come back! Ben looks and looks, but he cannot find her. It is the worst day ever. Ben's sadness turns into determination as he retraces his steps, makes posters, and enlists other people to help turn Aggie from a lost pup to a found one.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Lois Rubin Gross
When Ben takes his dog, Aggie, to the park to play, he loses track of her. Aggie is a beagle-like pup with some bad habits, like chewing and pooping and having doggie breath. That doesn't change Ben's love for her, or his sadness at having lost his friend. With the help of his parents, Ben goes on an extensive Aggie hunt. Ben tells his friend, Mr. Thomas, about Aggie's disappearance and Mr. Thomas, who is blind, teaches Ben new ways to "look" for Aggie by using his other senses. This delightful early chapter book covers a huge range of emotions for young readers. It shows the guilt Ben feels that perhaps Aggie ran away from him and how, despite her faults as a pet, he still loves her and wants her back. It also provides a positive model of a blind adult who shows Ben an important lesson about ability. The line drawn pictures are sweet and cartoonish, and the conclusion when Aggie returns badly in need of a bath will evoke giggles as everyone who encounters Aggie is shown holding their respective noses. This is a charming, substantive book that will give a real feeling of accomplishment to new readers. Reviewer: Lois Rubin Gross
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Aggie and Ben are playing catch in the park when Ben throws the ball too far and his pup doesn't come back. He looks everywhere, but can't find her. He and his parents make phone calls and posters, retrace their steps, and ask people if they've seen Aggie. When these efforts fail, Ben consults his blind friend, Mr. Thomas, who suggests a different approach. The book is split into three chapters for early readers, appropriately named "The Bad Day," "The Awful Night," and "Found!" Dormer's humorous pen, ink, and watercolor cartoons add to the charm of this story. Perfect for newly independent readers, the short sentences and limited vocabulary will help children build confidence.—Sarah Polace, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma, OH
Kirkus Reviews

In three short chapters filled with many short words, readers will recognize a child's trauma about a lost pet.

Ben, whom readers have met before in the Aggie and Ben series, is a conscientious person to his little dog, Aggie. He takes good care of her, feeds her, gives her large quantities of attention and affection and shares the bed, which he thinks is his and she knows is hers. But on her walk in the park, Aggie chases the red ball that she usually returns to him and doesn't come back. She is lost. Ben and his parents do everything they can to find their special friend, posting signs, searching, asking others—to no avail. After a terrible night, the boy returns to the park, where they again encounter friends, to resume the search. Mr. Thomas, who is blind, suggests thatBen use his ears to locate her. Eureka! He hears her howl, she is found and everyone is happy. Despite her bad breath and, worse, the stench of something Aggie has rolled in—a not uncommon habit of pups—all ends well. Art in pen, ink and watercolor shows the characters and their emotions clearly in a faux childlike drawing style.

Anyone who has worried about the loss of a special friend will understand the feelings involved with great sympathy and empathy.(Easy reader. 4-7)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781570916335
  • Publisher: Charlesbridge Publishing, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/1/2011
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 1,068,930
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD130L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Lori Ries was born in Syracuse, New York, the eldest of four children. She discovered a love for storytelling as a young child and wrote her first story when she was just ten years old. It was a short story called "Jo-Jo the Raccoon" based on a true story about a baby raccoon that Lori's grandfather found on the side of the road and brought home for his children to raise. Lori lives in Tigard, Oregon, with her husband and three children.
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