BN.com Gift Guide

Agincourt: Henry V and the Battle That Made England

( 19 )

Overview

Waged almost six centuries ago, the Battle of Agincourt still captivates. It is the classic underdog story, and generations have wondered how the English—outmanned by the French six to one—could have succeeded so bravely and brilliantly. Drawing on a wide range of sources, Juliet Barker paints a gripping narrative of the October 1415 clash between the outnumbered English archers and the heavily armored French knights. Populated with chivalrous heroes, dastardly spies, and a ferocious and bold king, AGINCOURT is ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$11.52
BN.com price
(Save 27%)$15.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (22) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $7.45   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Agincourt: Henry V and the Battle That Made England

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

Waged almost six centuries ago, the Battle of Agincourt still captivates. It is the classic underdog story, and generations have wondered how the English—outmanned by the French six to one—could have succeeded so bravely and brilliantly. Drawing on a wide range of sources, Juliet Barker paints a gripping narrative of the October 1415 clash between the outnumbered English archers and the heavily armored French knights. Populated with chivalrous heroes, dastardly spies, and a ferocious and bold king, AGINCOURT is as earthshaking as its subject—and confirms Juliet Barker's status as both a historian and a storyteller of the first rank.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Barker, a British biographer (The Brontas) and accomplished medievalist, brings an excellent synergy of academic and literary skills to this study of the 1415 British campaign in France and the battle that was its climax, around which she elaborately reconstructs the conflict's antecedents. Henry V spent years preparing the ground: asserting initially shaky authority in England, exploiting domestic strife in France and isolating the disorganized kingdom from its traditional allies. During the campaign itself, a train of artillery manned by foreign gunners supplemented the men-at-arms and the longbowmen, who were the British army's real backbone. But the French were not the vainglorious incompetents of English legend and Shakespearean drama. Many in northern France made a brave effort, often putting aside personal and political differences to stand together at Agincourt, where they came closer to success than is generally realized. Barker shows that the battle hung by a thread: French numbers against English desperation, with courage a common virtue. She also illustrates how Agincourt was decisive-not only for its consequences in France. An English defeat would have meant chaos, perhaps civil war. Destiny on both sides of the Channel turned on the outcome of St. Crispin's Day. (June 14) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
October 25, 1415, St. Crispin's Day. Several thousand exhausted and diseased English soldiers, along with many nobles and King Henry V himself, were desperately trying to get to the safety of Calais when they came up against a far greater number of French forces, who were well rested and well fed. Miraculously, the English not only won the ensuing battle of Agincourt but destroyed most of France's nobility, almost all of whom were in the French forces. Barker (Wordsworth: A Life), a medievalist by training, here tackles one of the most significant battles of the Middle Ages. Beginning with Henry's training in the Welsh wars, Barker weaves a gripping narrative of the events that led to his invasion of France in August 1415, the long siege of Harfleur that followed, and the Battle of Agincourt and its aftermath. Along the way, she discusses controversies about the sizes of the respective armies and the effectiveness of the new longbow. Discarding the myths that have surrounded the battle, she gives a true feeling of the stress and exhaustion of this harrowing campaign, immortalized by Shakespeare. The truth of Agincourt is still being sought by scholars and is every bit as engrossing as the myth. Ann Curry's recent Agincourt: A New History concludes that the opposing forces were more evenly matched in numbers. Both Barker and Curry have written worthy volumes for any library. If a public library must choose only one, Barker's is the more accessible to general readers.-Robert Harbison, Western Kentucky Univ. Lib., Bowling Green Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Henry V leads the English to a stunning victory over a vastly superior French force at Agincourt in 1415. A favorite of military historians and well-known to acolytes of Shakespeare, the battle of Agincourt is remembered largely because of the odds overcome by an outmanned force of Englishmen. Historian Barker (Wordsworth: A Life, 2005) focuses on events leading up to the battle and how that battle defined Henry's rule and legacy. Following the death of his father, Henry moved swiftly to secure his throne and proceeded to launch a campaign to retake what he viewed as his rightful inheritance in France. An unstable French monarch and rival factions of French noblemen wary of joining forces only strengthened Henry's confidence. After capturing the city of Harfleur, Henry decided to move his troops, significantly weakened by dysentery, to the English stronghold of Calais. The French army, however, had other plans. While other sources, namely Curry's Agincourt: A New History (2005), argue for a smaller discrepancy, Barker gives the French a 6:1 advantage. The French, though, were led by vainglorious men with conflicting agendas. A soggy battlefield and questionable tactics essentially neutralized the French cavalry, allowing the cornered English to use their vaunted Welsh longbows to annihilate their enemy. Barker estimates French losses in the thousands while the English lost less than a quarter of their considerably smaller force. Though an impressive victory, its long-term ramifications were few, and Barker argues that perhaps its most significant effect was persuading the populace of Henry's divine right to rule. The author's only weakness is a tendency to justify Henry's few missteps andthe failures of the French commanders in order to make the battle seem more epic and less luck or poor execution. Like a Welsh archer: hits the mark more often than not.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316015042
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 8/23/2007
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 393,867
  • Product dimensions: 5.58 (w) x 10.88 (h) x 1.27 (d)

Meet the Author

Juliet Barker is the distinguished biographer of Wordsworth and the Bronte sisters. She is also a noted medievalist and lives with her family in the UK.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Some days you get the bear and somedays the bear gets you

    This is truly an excellent, magnificent telling of a memorable battle between the French and English. I do not understand the so-called debate about tactics when it is clear that there were none. Apparently, it was a simple frontal attack en masse with the troops arranged in ranks and files. Apparently, all the significant "leaders" wanted to be in the first rank which they called "the Vanguard" which normally refers to the lead maneuver element of a body of troops as it moves to contact. This was no "movement to contact" because they were already in contact. Where were the "leaders" when the close in fighting began? It seems likely that they were in the file following the leader. If not, they were completely separated from him which makes this a leaderless mob instead of a fighting maneuver element. There is no mention of any flanking effort or encirclement. The treeline itself which formed the battlefield by dictating where one could move constricted the battlefield into a narrow, elongated shape much like a bowling alley. I fully accept the numbers given by the author because it is obvious the French thought this was going to be easy and they would simply walk over the opposition. They were supremely over confident to the point of arrogance and their leaders demonstrated their disdain when they lined up to be a part of the spoils gathering after the battle. Instead of swooping on their prey like eagles on the kill, they lazily floated in like buzzards for a meal. Unfortunately for them, they discovered a desperate force organized into a defensive structure who had already determined they would probably die but they would exact the heaviest penalty they could on the attacker for each of their lives. Their desperation is proven by the method of killing the fallen knights (dagger through the visor) and the killing of the prisoners as the battle was winding down. This was seen as a strict "kill or be killed" situation and there was no time to discuss or debate the dainties or niceties of war. I would also suggest that they had been suffering from Amoebic Dysentary picked up from eating raw and polluted shellfish because of their area of operation in the coastal flats at the mouth of the Seine and Somme. One only has to look back to the headwaters to see where they were coming from and everything that could have been thrown into the river or existing drainage. This was a developing country. The author's research seems fantastic and she has even walked the battlefield. I thoroughly enjoyed the book and highly recommend it to others. It is very enlightening and very provocative when one considers what the outcome could have been if better decisions had been made. It is extremely touching when one considers the personal principles and morals that have to be suspended which lead to one soldier killing another in a moment of the other's helplessness. When you do something because you honestly believed you had to do it for your own survival. War is hell and this is part of the reason why.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2007

    famous battle

    While the tactics and number of combatants are still debated, what is assured is the battle's place in history. The author does a good job of describing the personalities and politics and aftermath that Shakespeare made famous.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 10, 2012

    Wonderfully written history

    Juliet Barker has written a well researched history of an amazingly complex time. Reads like a novel and full of fascinating facts.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 19 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)