Aglow in the Dark: The Revolutionary Science of Biofluorescence

( 1 )

Overview

In the early 1960s, in a small shack on the Washington coast, a young, self-educated Japanese scientist performed an experiment to determine what made a certain jellyfish glow. The substance he discovered, green fluorescent protein, would revolutionize molecular biology, transforming our study of everything from the AIDS virus to the workings of the brain. Aglow in the Dark follows the path that took this glowing compound from its inauspicious arrival on the scientific scene to its present-day eminence as one of ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (4) from $14.55   
  • New (1) from $66.25   
  • Used (3) from $14.55   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$66.25
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(213)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

In the early 1960s, in a small shack on the Washington coast, a young, self-educated Japanese scientist performed an experiment to determine what made a certain jellyfish glow. The substance he discovered, green fluorescent protein, would revolutionize molecular biology, transforming our study of everything from the AIDS virus to the workings of the brain. Aglow in the Dark follows the path that took this glowing compound from its inauspicious arrival on the scientific scene to its present-day eminence as one of the most groundbreaking discoveries of the twentieth century.

The story unfolds in far-flung places, from the coral reefs of the Pacific Ocean, to the medical schools and marine stations of our leading universities, to a cold war-era research laboratory in Moscow. Traversing the globe and the decades, Aglow in the Dark conveys the human fascination with bioluminescence, or "living light," its little-known application in war, forensic science, and molecular biology, and how it led to the finding of green fluorescent protein. The book reveals a hidden world where light is manipulated by animals and humans and put to remarkable uses—unlocking the secrets of the human brain, conquering dreaded diseases, and perhaps someday linking minds and machines. The authors deftly lead the reader through a complex story at the interface of biology and physics—and into the realm of wonder on the frontiers of scientific endeavor.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booklist

Self-illuminating creatures have drawn curiosity since time immemorial, but only a few researchers have conducted experiments to discover the source of their glow. One Raphaël Dubois determined in 1887 that it's a chemical reaction, the exact components of which eluded the best efforts of Princeton professor Edmund Newton Harvey. Enter the hero of the authors' story: Osamu Shimomura. A teenage survivor of the nuclear bombing of Nagasaki, he emerged from the ruins as a young biologist in the mid-1950s who had no strong idea of what to study. Handed bluish extract of sea flies by his boss, who added lapidary guidance—'We know nothing about this, just that it glows'—Shimomura solved the problem in a few years. Shimomura's eureka moment is well drawn by the authors, as is their explanation of the chemistry of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) Shimomura isolated. GFP has become a lucrative favorite of biotechnologists, who transformed the study of neural tissue by inventing GFP markers. Writing with warmth and optimism, Pieribone and Gruber will fascinate budding biochemistry students.
— Gilbert Taylor

Science News

The last German submarine sunk in World War I was betrayed when it triggered the glow of microbes in the Mediterranean Sea. This phenomenon, which gives certain jellyfish their flickering luminescence and is characteristic of more than 90 percent of deep-sea creatures, is called biofluorescence. Pieribone and Gruber reveal the painstaking efforts of scientists to identify the mechanisms behind this mysterious light...Cellular-molecular biologist Pieribone and journalist Gruber detail how the groundbreaking discoveries of these and other researchers have had widespread implications in forensic science, molecular biology, and neuroscience.

Nature

[A] well-narrated and beautifully illustrated book. It combines character studies of the people involved with a thoroughly researched story of the unlikely events that led to the main discoveries...The main narrative is riveting, and the authors capture the sometimes curious way that science progresses through an alternation of chance discoveries and systematic, goal-directed experiments. Students wondering whether they are cut out to become scientists ought to be encouraged by the diverse cast of characters involved in solving the mystery of bioluminescence...These are exciting times for biology, and this accessible and lively introduction conveys the sheer pleasure of discovery, as well as the enormous technological potential of fluorescent proteins.
— Thomas G. Oertner

Nature Cell Biology

Aglow in the Dark chronicles this saga of discovery of bioluminescence as it entertainingly traces the history of human interaction with bioluminescence, and charts the development of green fluorescent protein (GEP) as one of the groundbreaking discoveries of the 20th century. The text is superbly written and gripping throughout. As an authoritative introduction to the science of fluorescent proteins, the book should be obligatory reading for every newcomer to biology...In portraying the activities of a unique creative community in a clear and animated fashion, Pieribone and Gruber convey the spirit of scientific endeavor perfectly: discovery is not just a goal, but an unpredictable process as dependent on intellectual genius as on creative inspiration and pure luck. The pivotal figures traced in the book are shown to have all worked in an uncertain, rapidly changing scientific terrain, building on the work of others in ways they could hardly have anticipated. Pieribone and Gruber, however, leave no question of what the future of fluorescent protein technology holds. One has only to look at the current biological journals to realize that biofluorescence is revolutionary: use of fluorescent protein technology is now the order of the day.
— Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz

Nature
[A] well-narrated and beautifully illustrated book. It combines character studies of the people involved with a thoroughly researched story of the unlikely events that led to the main discoveries...The main narrative is riveting, and the authors capture the sometimes curious way that science progresses through an alternation of chance discoveries and systematic, goal-directed experiments. Students wondering whether they are cut out to become scientists ought to be encouraged by the diverse cast of characters involved in solving the mystery of bioluminescence...These are exciting times for biology, and this accessible and lively introduction conveys the sheer pleasure of discovery, as well as the enormous technological potential of fluorescent proteins.
— Thomas G. Oertner
Booklist
Self-illuminating creatures have drawn curiosity since time immemorial, but only a few researchers have conducted experiments to discover the source of their glow. One Raphaël Dubois determined in 1887 that it's a chemical reaction, the exact components of which eluded the best efforts of Princeton professor Edmund Newton Harvey. Enter the hero of the authors' story: Osamu Shimomura. A teenage survivor of the nuclear bombing of Nagasaki, he emerged from the ruins as a young biologist in the mid-1950s who had no strong idea of what to study. Handed bluish extract of sea flies by his boss, who added lapidary guidance--'We know nothing about this, just that it glows'--Shimomura solved the problem in a few years. Shimomura's eureka moment is well drawn by the authors, as is their explanation of the chemistry of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) Shimomura isolated. GFP has become a lucrative favorite of biotechnologists, who transformed the study of neural tissue by inventing GFP markers. Writing with warmth and optimism, Pieribone and Gruber will fascinate budding biochemistry students.
— Gilbert Taylor
Science News
The last German submarine sunk in World War I was betrayed when it triggered the glow of microbes in the Mediterranean Sea. This phenomenon, which gives certain jellyfish their flickering luminescence and is characteristic of more than 90 percent of deep-sea creatures, is called biofluorescence. Pieribone and Gruber reveal the painstaking efforts of scientists to identify the mechanisms behind this mysterious light...Cellular-molecular biologist Pieribone and journalist Gruber detail how the groundbreaking discoveries of these and other researchers have had widespread implications in forensic science, molecular biology, and neuroscience.
Nature Cell Biology
Aglow in the Dark chronicles this saga of discovery of bioluminescence as it entertainingly traces the history of human interaction with bioluminescence, and charts the development of green fluorescent protein (GEP) as one of the groundbreaking discoveries of the 20th century. The text is superbly written and gripping throughout. As an authoritative introduction to the science of fluorescent proteins, the book should be obligatory reading for every newcomer to biology...In portraying the activities of a unique creative community in a clear and animated fashion, Pieribone and Gruber convey the spirit of scientific endeavor perfectly: discovery is not just a goal, but an unpredictable process as dependent on intellectual genius as on creative inspiration and pure luck. The pivotal figures traced in the book are shown to have all worked in an uncertain, rapidly changing scientific terrain, building on the work of others in ways they could hardly have anticipated. Pieribone and Gruber, however, leave no question of what the future of fluorescent protein technology holds. One has only to look at the current biological journals to realize that biofluorescence is revolutionary: use of fluorescent protein technology is now the order of the day.
— Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674024137
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 4/15/2007
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 288

Meet the Author

Vincent Pieribone is Associate Professor, Yale University School of Medicine, and Associate Fellow, The John B. Pierce Laboratory, Yale University.

David F. Gruber is a science journalist and biological oceanographer at Rutgers University Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword by Sylvia Nasar

Prologue

1. Living Light

2. Fireflies of the Sea

3. From the Fires of Nagasaki

4. The Secret of the Jellyfish's Flicker

5. The Light at the End of the Rainbow

6. Illuminating the Cell

7. Glow Worms

8. Fluorescent Spies

9. A Rosy Dawn

10. Shimmering Reefs

11. Lighting Up the Brain

12. Glowing Thoughts

Notes

Acknowledgments

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2013

    Recommended for scuba divers

    My friend, an avid scuba diver, enjoyed this book on the subject of biofluoresence under the sea, where fish can be seen glowing in fantastic colors.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)