Agreement and Head Movement: Clitics, Incorporation, and Defective Goals

Overview

In Agreement and Head Movement, Ian Roberts explores the consequences of Chomsky's conjecture that head-movement is not part of the narrow syntax, the computational system that relates the lexicon to the interfaces. Unlike other treatments of the subject that discard the concept entirely, Roberts's monograph retains the core intuition behind head-movement and examines to what extent it can be reformulated and rethought. Roberts argues that the current conception of syntax must accommodate a species of ...

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Overview

In Agreement and Head Movement, Ian Roberts explores the consequences of Chomsky's conjecture that head-movement is not part of the narrow syntax, the computational system that relates the lexicon to the interfaces. Unlike other treatments of the subject that discard the concept entirely, Roberts's monograph retains the core intuition behind head-movement and examines to what extent it can be reformulated and rethought. Roberts argues that the current conception of syntax must accommodate a species of head-movement, although this operation differs somewhat in technical detail and in empirical coverage from earlier understandings of it. He proposes that head-movement is part of the narrow syntax and that it applies where the goal of an Agree relation is defective, in a sense that he defines.

Roberts argues that the theoretical status of head-movement is very similar—in fact identical in various ways—to that of XP-movement. Thus head-movement, like XP-movement, should be regarded as part of narrow syntax exactly to the extent that XP-movement should be. If one aspect of minimalist theorizing is to eliminate unnecessary distinctions, then Roberts's argument can be seen as eliminating the distinction between "heads" and "phrases" in relation to internal merge (and therefore reducing the distinctions currently made between internal and external merge).

Linguistic Inquiry Monographs 59

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
"In Agreement and Head Movement, Roberts has one major goal in mind: to show that head movement, which at times has been relegated to PF, in fact belongs in narrow syntax with phrasal movement. From the huge literature on the topic, he distills the most essential elements in order to develop a highly sophisticated analysis; and he marshals evidence for it from a remarkable range of languages. Whether one agrees with him or not, this is a work that absolutely cannot be ignored. Its achievement puts it alongside Baker's study of incorporation in the scope and depth of inquiry into how heads interact with other heads and phrases." Shigeru Miyagawa, MIT
Shigeru Miyagawa

In Agreement and Head Movement, Roberts has one major goal in mind: to show that head movement, which at times has been relegated to PF, in fact belongs in narrow syntax with phrasal movement. From the huge literature on the topic, he distills the most essential elements in order to develop a highly sophisticated analysis; and he marshals evidence for it from a remarkable range of languages. Whether one agrees with him or not, this is a work that absolutely cannot be ignored. Its achievement puts it alongside Baker's study of incorporation in the scope and depth of inquiry into how heads interact with other heads and phrases.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262014304
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 7/30/2010
  • Series: Linguistic Inquiry Monographs , #59
  • Pages: 302
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Ian Roberts is Professor of Linguistics at Cambridge University.

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Table of Contents

Series Foreword vii

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction 1

1 LF-Effects of Head Movement 7

1.1 Head Movement and Licensing Polarity Items 8

1.2 Lechner (2005) on Semantically Active Head Movement (SAHM) 13

1.3 Remnant Movement and LF-Effects 17

1.4 The Lack of Semantic Effects of Head Movement: Matushansky (2006) 23

1.5 Conclusion 28

2 Head Movement and Pied-Piping 29

2.1 Structure Preservation 30

2.2 Chain Uniformity 31

2.3 The A-over-A Condition 33

2.4 Conclusion 38

3 Cliticization 41

3.1 Introduction: Minimal Phases 41

3.2 Movement to a Minimal Category 50

3.3 Phase Heads as Targets of Cliticization: Adverbal and Second-Position Clitics 65

3.4 Cyclic Clitic Movement: Clitic Climbing 75

3.4.1 "Clitic Climbing" in Compound Tenses 76

3.4.2 Clitic Climbing in Restructuring Contexts 79

3.4.3 Clitics in Causative Constructions 90

3.4.4 Conclusion 101

3.5 Subject Clitics 102

3.5.1 Cliticization to T: Subject Clitics in Northern Italian and Tuscan Dialects 102

3.5.2 Subject Cliticization to C in Rhaeto-Romansch and Elsewhere 114

3.5.3 Subject-Clitic Merger in v: si/se Constructions 120

3.5.4 Conclusion 127

3.6 Other Aspects of Romance Cliticization 128

3.6.1 Complement Clitic Doubling 128

3.6.2 Indirect-Object Clitics, Clitic Clusters, and the Person-Case Constraint 139

3.6.3 Cliticization to P and Elsewhere 149

3.7 Conclusion 155

4 Verb Movement and Incorporation 157

4.1 Verb Movement 158

4.1.1 Verb Movement and the A-over-A Principle 158

4.1.2 V-to-T Movement 159

4.1.3 Verb Second 168

4.1.4 Conclusion 183

4.2 Incorporation 183

4.2.1 Verb Incorporation 183

4.2.2 A Note on Noun Incorporation 188

4.3 Conclusion 191

5 Head Movement and the Theory of Movement 193

5.1 The Head Movement Constraint 193

5.2 Excorporation 206

5.3 Types of Movement 208

6 Conclusions 213

Notes 217

References 253

Index 277

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