Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism

Overview

This landmark work challenges every accepted notion about the nature of black women's lives. All progressive struggles are significant only when taking place within a feminist movement, which states that race class & sex are immutable facts of exist
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Overview

This landmark work challenges every accepted notion about the nature of black women's lives. All progressive struggles are significant only when taking place within a feminist movement, which states that race class & sex are immutable facts of exist
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for the book:

"Ain’t I a Woman is one of the most interesting, lucid books dealing with the subject of Feminism. The book can be recommended wholeheartedly to anyone who is interested in black history, in women’s history, or in that much-overlooked connection between the two." —Maria K. Mootry Ikerionwu, Phylon (1983)

"…an absorbing delineation of the American black woman’s mark(s) of oppression at the hands of racist, misogynist, imperialist, capitalist patriarchy….Feminists must read this book…" —Cheryl Clarke, Off Our Backs (1982)

"Since the publication of Ain’t I A Woman in 1981, bell hooks has become one of the United States’ most acute cultural critics. Writing from a clearly stated position as an African American woman, hooks’s early work helped re-map feminist theory in the United States with her consistent analysis of the interrelationships of race, gender and class in contemporary cultural life." —Sally Keenan, Journal of American Studies (1995)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781138821514
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 9/26/2014
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 220

Meet the Author

A cultural critic, an intellectual, and a feminist writer, bell hooks is best known for classic books including Feminist Theory, Bone Black, All About Love, Rock My Soul, Belonging, We Real Cool, Where We Stand, Teaching to Transgress, Teaching Community, Outlaw Culture, and Reel to Real. hooks is Distinguished Professor in Residence in Appalachian Studies at Berea College, and resides in her home state of Kentucky.

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Table of Contents

Preface to the New Edition Introduction 1. Sexism and the Black Female Slave Experience 2. Continued Devaluation of Black Womanhood 3. The Imperialism of Patriarchy 4. Racism and Feminism: The Issue of Accountability 5. Black Women and Feminism

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2000

    The truth about the role of black women in society

    This book was a book that really opened my eyes about the way society perceives me as a black woman as well as the way I even perceive myself. Ain't I a woman makes sense of the senselessness of the way in which black women are treated. It is a truly perceptive and insightful book that anyone living in American society should read.

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