Airs Beneath the Moon

Airs Beneath the Moon

4.2 7
by Toby Bishop
     
 

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In the Duchy of Oc, the most precious of creatures are the winged horses blessed by the goddess Kalla. When one is born, it is immediately taken to the Academy of the Air to be trained and watched over. But when a spirited peasant girl bonds with a winged horse of her own, the Academy gets more than it bargained for.

Overview

In the Duchy of Oc, the most precious of creatures are the winged horses blessed by the goddess Kalla. When one is born, it is immediately taken to the Academy of the Air to be trained and watched over. But when a spirited peasant girl bonds with a winged horse of her own, the Academy gets more than it bargained for.

Editorial Reviews

The Barnes & Noble Review
Celebrated social science fiction novelist Louise Marley (The Terrorists of Irustan, The Maquisarde, et al.) tries her hand at classic fantasy -- under the pseudonym Toby Bishop -- with a decidedly more lighthearted offering about a teenage girl and the birth of a winged horse that irrevocably changes her life, for better or worse.

The protagonist of Airs Beneath the Moon is 14-year-old Larkyn Hamley, the daughter of an Uplands farmer -- "a girl of the soil and the seasons" -- who finds a pregnant mare near death and helps to bring its foal into the world even as the animal draws its last breath. The newborn colt is miraculously born with wings, but before anyone from Larkyn's remote village can contact representatives from the Duchy of Oc -- where the breeding, raising, and training of winged horses is nothing short of sacrosanct -- Larkyn bonds with the beautiful black colt (named Tup) and unknowingly sets in motion a chain of events that will not only throw the entire duchy into political pandemonium but also put her life and Tup's in mortal danger...

Marley's reason for using the pseudonym is clear: Airs Beneath the Moon is a dramatic departure for an author known for thematically complex, intellectually challenging, and profoundly moving works like The Child Goddess. Her Toby Bishop persona writes a more simplistic, relatively straightforward narrative, with distinctly young adult themes (finding one's place in the world, the importance of friendship, honor, etc.) that should appeal to fantasy fans of all ages -- especially those who love horses. Paul Goat Allen

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780441014620
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
12/26/2006
Series:
Horse Mistress Saga Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
4.34(w) x 6.84(h) x 0.95(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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Airs Beneath the Moon 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
On Deeping Farm in the uplands, Larkyn Hamley finds a horse in a rundown condition and nurses it back to health not knowing that it is pregnant. Char goes into a difficult labor until she gives birth to a mare Tup who has wings and therefore is technically the property of the duke of Oc. The winged mares are the duchy¿s only defense if war ever comes to the land. Larkyn isn¿t thinking of politics as she cares for and bonds with Tup until the Horse Mistress Philippa Winter comes to the farm.------------------ She knows at first glance that Tup and Larkyn are imprinted and nothing short of death can part them. Both must go to the Academy of Air to train which will be hard on Larkyn because the girls in training will see her as a country bumpkin and Tup looks like a mongrel of different types of flying horses. When they arrive at the Academy, the duke¿s son takes a special interest in Tup which is an ill omen because the diabolical heir wants something and with his father dying very few will be able to say no to him. Larkyn plans to outwit him once she figures out what ever deed he plans.----------------- Toby Bishop known to her fans as Louise Marley has written a classic fantasy with an evil duke vs. a pretty strong willed female who with allies helping her outwit her enemies. There is plenty of action in this sweet adult fairy tale and teens that like fantasy will also enjoy this great tale. The support cast plays an important part in this fine tale starring a heroine and her little Pegasus.----------------- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very original. And overall, GREAT BOOK!
Katdancin More than 1 year ago
I wasn't sure I was going to like this book when I first started reading it. I found, however, that the characters created were very interesting and varied. I especially liked the herion because she was not your usual simpering little rich miss as in a lot of books. She had strength and a mind of her own. The story got better as it went along and I am looking forward to reading the next book, which I hear has just come out.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Larkyn Hamley lives in the Uplands in the Duchy of Oc. Until recently she's lived a pretty normal life on the family farm with her three brothers. Until she finds Char. Horses are more than rare in the Uplands, and until now Larkyn has never seen a real one. But, here she is, and it's only the beginning. Char dies trying to give birth to her foal. Not just any horse, but a winged horse! Winged horses, by law, belong to the Duke. Their bloodlines are monitored. Winged horses are bred. They don't just show up on farms in the Uplands. Until now.

What Larkyn doesn't know is that winged horses bond for life with one female only. Usually those females are specially chosen, monitored, and trained. All Larkyn knows is that her new friend Tup needs to be fed and cared for, and Tup doesn't really like her brothers. By the time Mistress Phillipa Winter from the Academy arrives, it's too late. Larkyn and Tup are inseparable. There is really no choice to be made. She wasn't chosen, she's not prepared, she's far too young, and she may never fit in, but Larkyn is off to the Academy with Tup, to train for their service to the Duke.

It's quickly apparent that fitting in, while virtually impossible, is the least of Larkyn's problems. And, difficult as the situation is, Larkyn is the least of the Academy's problems. When the Duke dies, and his son takes over, there may be a lot more to worry about, for the entire Duchy.

This book is unbelievably absorbing! At first I found it mildly hard to follow, because it doesn't explain everything outright. Gradually, I realized that all my questions were answered as the story unfolded. By the end I not only appreciated the assumption of intelligent readership, I also realized how much more involved in the story I was, because of the way it was written. Not to mention that it is, plain and simple, a great story. All of the characters are very well formed, very real, and interesting. The Duke's son is incredibly disturbing, as are some of his habits, most of which are only alluded to (and trust me, that's a good thing). But he's kind of pitiful at the same time; you almost feel a little bad for him. Almost.

This is the first in what is planned as a trilogy. Good thing too, otherwise I would have some issues with Ms. Bishop. I hadn't had nearly enough by the end of this book. It doesn't so much end with an "OMG! What happens next?" but more of an "I want to know more. I want to spend more time here." I think I'll end up reading it over and over until the next one comes out!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Larkyn Hamley lives in the Uplands in the Duchy of Oc. Until recently she¿s lived a pretty normal life on the family farm with her three brothers. Until she finds Char. Horses are more than rare in the Uplands, and until now Larkyn has never seen a real one. But, here she is, and it¿s only the beginning. Char dies trying to give birth to her foal. Not just any horse, but a winged horse! Winged horses, by law, belong to the Duke. Their bloodlines are monitored. Winged horses are bred. They don¿t just show up on farms in the Uplands. Until now. What Larkyn doesn¿t know is that winged horses bond for life with one female only. Usually those females are specially chosen, monitored, and trained. All Larkyn knows is that her new friend Tup needs to be fed and cared for, and Tup doesn¿t really like her brothers. By the time Mistress Phillipa Winter from the Academy arrives, it¿s too late. Larkyn and Tup are inseparable. There is really no choice to be made. She wasn¿t chosen, she¿s not prepared, she¿s far too young, and she may never fit in, but Larkyn is off to the Academy with Tup, to train for their service to the Duke. It¿s quickly apparent that fitting in, while virtually impossible, is the least of Larkyn¿s problems. And, difficult as the situation is, Larkyn is the least of the Academy¿s problems. When the Duke dies, and his son takes over, there may be a lot more to worry about, for the entire Duchy. This book is unbelievably absorbing! At first I found it mildly hard to follow, because it doesn¿t explain everything outright. Gradually, I realized that all my questions were answered as the story unfolded. By the end I not only appreciated the assumption of intelligent readership, I also realized how much more involved in the story I was, because of the way it was written. Not to mention that it is, plain and simple, a great story. All of the characters are very well formed, very real, and interesting. The Duke¿s son is incredibly disturbing, as are some of his habits, most of which are only alluded to (and trust me, that¿s a good thing). But he¿s kind of pitiful at the same time you almost feel a little bad for him. Almost. This is the first in what is planned as a trilogy. Good thing too, otherwise I would have some issues with Ms. Bishop. I hadn¿t had nearly enough by the end of this book. It doesn¿t so much end with an ¿OMG! What happens next?¿ but more of an ¿I want to know more. I want to spend more time here.¿ I think I¿ll end up reading it over and over until the next one comes out! **Reviewed by: Carrie Spellman
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very good book, the story moves along quite nicely and the characters a very likable. It felt like a girl version of Harry Potter in a way (other than she doesn't do magic). I loved the personalities of the animals!! I recommend this to anyone who needs a new story line.