Ajax for Web Application Developers

Ajax for Web Application Developers

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by Kris Hadlock
     
 

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Reusable components and patterns for Ajax-driven applications

 

Ajax is one of the latest and greatest ways to improve users’ online experience and create new and innovative web functionality. By allowing specific parts of a web page to be displayed without refreshing the entire page, Ajax significantly enhances the experience of web

Overview

Reusable components and patterns for Ajax-driven applications

 

Ajax is one of the latest and greatest ways to improve users’ online experience and create new and innovative web functionality. By allowing specific parts of a web page to be displayed without refreshing the entire page, Ajax significantly enhances the experience of web applications. It also lets web developers create intuitive and innovative interaction processes.

 

Ajax for Web Application Developers provides the in-depth working knowledge of Ajax that web developers need to take their web applications to the next level. The book shows how to create an Ajax-driven web application from an object-oriented perspective, and it includes discussion of several useful Ajax design patterns.

 

This detailed guide covers the creation of connections to a MySQL database with PHP 5 via a custom Ajax engine and shows how to gracefully format the response with CSS, JavaScript, and XHTML while keeping the data tightly secure. It also covers the use of four custom Ajax-enabled components in an application and how to create each of them from scratch.

 

The final section of the book combines the individual code examples and techniques from earlier chapters of the book into one larger, Ajax-driven application—an internal web mail application that can be used in any user-based application, such as a community-based web application. Readers will learn not only how to create and use their own reusable Ajax components in this application

but also how to connect their components to any future Ajax applications that they might build.

 

Web Development/Ajax/JavaScript 

Editorial Reviews

The Barnes & Noble Review
Suddenly, hundreds of enterprises are doing serious work with Ajax. Now, Kris Hadlock has written a web application developer's guide to Ajax that reflects all this experience.

You may have seen Hadlock's cover story on Ajax in .NET magazine. That was just a taste. In this book, he offers a comprehensive Ajax tutorial built around the construction of a full-fledged application from start to finish

You'll start by plumbing the inner workings of the XMLHttpRequest object that's central to the way Ajax works. Hadlock then turns to the response, introducing two specific data-interchange formats in which it can be received: XML and JSON. Part I concludes with a primer on displaying data with CSS and (X)HTML.

Hadlock walks through creating, using, debugging, and extending the Ajax JavaScript engine, then presents an in-depth treatment of creating reusable components. There are four chapter-length case study examples, including tree views, client-side validation, and data grids. The fourth: "Accordion," expands or collapses a web page to show only the data users are interested in. It's a classic example of the "desktop-like" richness Ajax brings to web development.

Next, Hadlock codifies a series of best-practice design patterns for Ajax development. If you're familiar with patterns, some of their names will sound familiar: singleton and observer, for example. There's a full chapter on using Model View Controller with Ajax; as well as chapters on patterns for multi-user applications, interaction, and usability. There's a full section on server-side database interaction -- and, as you might hope, a chapter on security, too. Now that Ajax is no longer a toy, this book will help you build the industrial-strength applications your clients now demand. Bill Camarda, from the December 2006 Read Only

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780132714914
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
10/30/2006
Series:
Developer's Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
448
File size:
11 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Kris Hadlock has been a contract web developer and designer since 1996. He is a featured columnist and writer for InformIT and numerous web design magazines. He is also the founder of Studio Sedition, a web application development firm, and is the cofounder of 33Inc, the company responsible for DashboardHQ. He maintains a blog called Designing with Code, which focuses on web application development from a design perspective and often features useful code snippets to help enhance web applications.You can find all of the above and more about Kris on his website at www.krishadlock.com.

 

 

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Ajax for Web Application Developers 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
manas_frontiersoft More than 1 year ago
Ajax is a jungle now. When yourAjax , myAjax , net/Ajax etc, are trying to give you a run around in the name of simplicity; this book reminds you that if you are good with keeping track of your codes, it will be a bypass or double bypass of these meshes. This book will render a confidence that Ajax is not an invisible GHOST, simply a block that can autonomously apprehended without reloading a whole webpage. My choices of programming are C++ and Java, like to see a complete layout without any gimicks. This book is one that kind; although it was published in 2006, worth of staying in your library. You may like to read other book like " Building Dynamic Ajax Applications Using WebShere for Web 2.0" and " Advance Ajax" by Shawn M. Lauriat.
Guest More than 1 year ago
With all the recent buzz (hype) about Ajax, Hadlock goes back to first principles. He shows that it all centres about the XMLHttpRequest object, which he thankfully elides to XHR. This lets a web page get data from the web server, or post data to it, in the form of a background command. Crucially, it does not need the browser to be refreshed. Basically, it can be seen as a loophole, through which the entire Ajax methodology has emerged. The book explains that XHR gives rise to a programming 'style' that is quite different from traditional http coding. As though you are writing a standard application that runs locally. For many programmers, this may have been how you started programming anyway. Plus, http coding has always had a certain stilted awkwardness about it. The coding narrative of the book might seem more natural and easier. One benefit to the programmer is increased productivity. You should be able to code more functionality, and have fewer bugs.