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Ajax Patterns and Best Practices

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Overview

Ajax is taking us into the next generation of web applications. Ajax has broken the client-server barrier by decoupling the client from the server, but an Ajax application still needs a server to extract content from. The most effective use of Ajax and the server requires an understanding of REST, an architectural style used to define Web services.

Ajax Patterns and Best Practices explores dynamic web applications that combine Ajax and REST as a single solution. A major ...

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Overview

Ajax is taking us into the next generation of web applications. Ajax has broken the client-server barrier by decoupling the client from the server, but an Ajax application still needs a server to extract content from. The most effective use of Ajax and the server requires an understanding of REST, an architectural style used to define Web services.

Ajax Patterns and Best Practices explores dynamic web applications that combine Ajax and REST as a single solution. A major advantage of REST is that, like Ajax, it can be used with today’s existing technologies.

This is an ideal book whether or not you have already created an Ajax application. Because the book outlines various patterns and best practices, you can quickly check and verify that you’re building an efficient Ajax application.

Inside the book, the patterns will answer the following questions:

  • What is Ajax, and REST, and why do you even care? And if I should care what are some examples of websites that make effective use of Ajax and REST?
  • What are the absolute basics of Ajax and REST and what parts of those basics should I use?
  • How should deal with large amounts of data? Should I cache the data? Should I get the data piece fed to me? (Patterns: Cache Controller, and Infinite Data)
  • People keep telling me that sessions and cookies are bad? Are they bad? What should I do? And while I think about how about generating content for other devices? (Permutations pattern)
  • I want to fix the back-button problem of the HTML browser. (State Navigation pattern)
  • What is the best way to create a mashup? (REST Based Model View Controller pattern)
  • My page has so many links managed by JavaScript, and I am losing control, help me make this more organized! (Decoupled Navigation pattern)
  • I understand that HTTP means I send data to the server, how about the server sending me some data without asking for it? (Persistent Communications pattern)
  • My server side code looks like a mess with tags and code pieces everywhere. How can I organize and make my HTML page behave like aSOA client and use REST based web services? (Content chunking pattern)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590596166
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 2/16/2006
  • Series: Expert's Voice Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 0.85 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 7.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Christian Gross is a consultant with vast experience in the client/server world. He has consulted for Microsoft on DNA solutions, and he has held consulting positions with Daimler Benz, Microsoft, NatWest, and other major corporations. Gross was a contributor to Professional Active Server Pages, Professional SQL Server 6.5 Administration, Professional NT Internet Information Server Administration, and Programming Microsoft Windows 2000 Unleashed. He is the author of A Programmer's Introduction to Windows DNA.
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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Introduction to Ajax 1
Ch. 2 The nuts and bolts of Ajax 19
Ch. 3 Content chunking pattern 53
Ch. 4 Cache controller pattern 79
Ch. 5 Permutations pattern 111
Ch. 6 Decoupled navigation pattern 153
Ch. 7 Representation morphing pattern 197
Ch. 8 Persistent communications pattern 225
Ch. 9 State navigation pattern 265
Ch. 10 Infinite data pattern 303
Ch. 11 REST-based model view controller pattern 333
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2006

    Must-have overview of Ajax programming & pattern development

    I very much enjoyed reading this book and got a lot out of it. To date, I've read about four of the major Ajax titles from various publishers, and this is the best of them so far. Christian Gross uses a very friendly voice and makes tacking the technical concepts behind modern-day web programming with Ajax - often a difficult task to simplify by the writing community - very easy to grasp. But don't think just because Gross slyly defines the relationship of JavaScript, XML and HTTP that this is merely a book for the newbie. He uses some very advanced patterns soon into the book, and bases his fundamental asynchronous calls on one of the better models of safe and reliable cross-browser object instantiation through the use of a simple factory pattern. It's effective programming by way of intelligent design. I appreciated the fact that the patterns described within the book aren't those that are becoming commonplace among blogs, wikis and books, demonstrating the range of Ajax programming on today's web. Gross also mentions the idiosyncrasies of the major browsers in handling things like HTTP headers, caching, output display (or lack thereof), and other things you'll need to know. Perfect examples of these helpful patterns are those used for persistent communications, cache controlling and permutations for multi-device UI rendering. (I still would have liked to see Gross' take on the 'AutoSave' feature that's so copied by early Ajax adopters, but I won't hold it against him.) I also enjoyed the fact that the book kept coming back to REST-style programming, with the capstone chapter being an exhibit of MVC-style applications development on top of REST. Not enough has been published in mainstream print about working with, much less describing, REST systems, so this was another definite plus. He also references several languages in describing patterns and concepts, such as PHP, Python, C# and Java. While it is a bit of a stretch for those of us not using each one of the languages, it does show cross-platform effectiveness. Gross also breaks down the importance of coding object-oriented JavaScript, using prototypes, code reuse and other best practices concepts that may take a few re-reads to fully stick, but will make you a better overall programmer. This is a definite must-have.

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    Posted October 16, 2008

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    Posted September 9, 2009

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