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Alabama Railroads
     

Alabama Railroads

4.0 1
by Wayne Cline
 

Alabama Railroads is the first extensive history of the
state's railway system, from the chartering of the Tuscumbia Railway Company
in January 1830, to the maturity of the system in the latter half of the
20th century, when Amtrak assumed control of the nation's passenger service.

Railroads built Alabama. Without them the state's vast
natural

Overview

Alabama Railroads is the first extensive history of the
state's railway system, from the chartering of the Tuscumbia Railway Company
in January 1830, to the maturity of the system in the latter half of the
20th century, when Amtrak assumed control of the nation's passenger service.

Railroads built Alabama. Without them the state's vast
natural resources could not have been developed. Scores of Alabama towns,
including the city of Birmingham, owe their existence to the railroads.
Moreover, Alabama legislators were instrumental in securing passage of
momentous land grant legislation that brought the railroad--and settlers--to
every section of the American frontier.

During the Civil War, the state's rail system was a primary
objective of Union raiders, and an Alabama rail connection into Chattanooga
proved to be a vital key to victory. After the war, the railroad shaped
politics and economic development in the state. Indeed, most of the important
events of the first 100 years of Alabama history were inßuenced in
a significant manner by the railroad. Alabama Railroads chronicles
these events--from land grant legislation and the strategic importance
of Alabama's railroads in the Civil War to the founding of Birmingham and
the development of the state's agricultural, mineral, and timber regions.

Wayne Cline traces the development of all the major lines
as well as the most prominent short lines, from the day in 1832 when the
first horse-drawn cars rolled over primitive tracks at Tuscumbia, to the
night in 1971 at Sylacauga when the final operating order was issued for
one of the 20th century's most famous streamliners. Along the way we meet
the varied cast of colorful characters who pioneered the railway system
that serves the state today. With more than 100 rare and vintage illustrations
from the 19th and early 20th centuries, Alabama Railroads places
Alabama's rail heritage in a national context and allows students of southern
history as well as railroad enthusiasts to view this Deep South state from
an entirely fresh perspective.

 

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Thanks should be given to Cline by all railroad historians for this book. The reader will discover that Alabama has an important place in the development of America's railroad system."—John W. Corns, President, Birmingham Railroad Heritage

"Cline's profusely illustrated Alabama Railroads fills an important gap in southern railway history. His survey of Alabama's railroad development will long serve as the standard work on the subject. It is an engaging read, full of southern entrepreneurs in pursuit of profits, their successes and failures in building major railways in the state and many minor ones as well, and an engaging tale of the birth of Birmingham's iron and steel industry."
—James A. Ward, University of Tennessee-Chattanooga

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780817308124
Publisher:
University of Alabama Press
Publication date:
01/28/1997
Pages:
328
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 11.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

Wayne Cline earned a master's degree from The University
of Alabama and has had a diversified career in business, government, and
education.

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Alabama Railroads 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MediaRaven 16 days ago
This book provides an extensive history on Alabama railroads and the state's industrial backbone. While there are ample photographs and illustrations (including some maps), the book is heavier on text with extensive information. It's not a ''picture book''! One oddity is the wide margins where the text appears.