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Alba y Ocaso (Daybreak, Nightfall)
     

Alba y Ocaso (Daybreak, Nightfall)

by Jorge Elias Lujan, Manuel Monroy (Illustrator)
 

Day and night, life and death are sometimes seen as opposites of each other. But they can also be understood as falling in a continuum, one containing the other.
In this wonderful pair of poems by noted Argentine/Mexican poet Jorge Elías Luján, both ideas are expressed. An Apple in the Apple Orchard describes a young boy and girl in the early morning

Overview


Day and night, life and death are sometimes seen as opposites of each other. But they can also be understood as falling in a continuum, one containing the other.
In this wonderful pair of poems by noted Argentine/Mexican poet Jorge Elías Luján, both ideas are expressed. An Apple in the Apple Orchard describes a young boy and girl in the early morning playing a sort of hide-and-seek amongst the apple trees. Pale As Bone takes the same children on a carousel ride where a Lady-as-Pale-as-a-Bone is trying to choose whom to take with her.
Manuel Monroy, a very talented young Mexican illustrator, sets both scenes in a magic garden in which the poems are like a kind of dance between and among the elements that constitute human experience.
The poetry, which is wonderful to read aloud, can be understood at its most literal level and at deeper levels with great pleasure. But no matter how it is read and understood, this evocative, mysterious book will be enjoyed.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Two enigmatic but hypnotic poems by the Argentina-born author of In My Hand constitute the text of this intriguing, often disquieting work. In "An Apple in the Orchard," a boy encounters a girl who "opens her mouth like a bewildered moon." Her hand "slides down/ her face from side to side" and "erases her mouth." In "Pale-as-Bone" a sinister-seeming Lady-as-Pale-as-a-Bone approaches the boy and girl as they ride the merry-go-round. Monroy, a Mexican artist, translates Luj n's elliptical imagery as a surreal sequence of scenes rendered in a deceptively childlike style. The results are dramatic, especially in the second poem, which becomes powerfully ominous. Lady-as-Pale-as-a-Bone resembles a cadaverous, ghostly moon and her streaming, night-blue hair is flecked with carrion crows. Like La Llorona, the weeping woman of Spanish folklore who wanders the streets looking for children to snatch, the lady frightens the two protagonists. She asks, "Which of these shall I carry off first?" Both poems wittily resolve the terror they evoke. In the first poem, the girl's "mouth slowly reappears on her face," as if it were "a moon returning/ from orbit around the apple"-or as if she were playing peek-a-boo ("Carahooria!"). In the second poem, the Lady takes neither boy nor girl but mounts a merry-go-round tin horse. Artistically complex, these tense poetic images may require considerable explication for younger audience members. Ages 8-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780888995353
Publisher:
Groundwood Books
Publication date:
04/04/2003
Edition description:
Spanish Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.38(w) x 8.34(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
8 Years

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