×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Albert and the Others
     

Albert and the Others

by Guy Delisle
 

Limbs are swapped and pants are dropped in Albert and the Others, a collection of wordless strips that expose the pleasures, pitfalls, and perversities of masculinity. In this companion volume to Aline and the Others (2006),Guy Delisle delves deep into the male psyche and emerges with twenty-six alphabetically arranged strips, named after the men who

Overview

Limbs are swapped and pants are dropped in Albert and the Others, a collection of wordless strips that expose the pleasures, pitfalls, and perversities of masculinity. In this companion volume to Aline and the Others (2006),Guy Delisle delves deep into the male psyche and emerges with twenty-six alphabetically arranged strips, named after the men who tumble through the pages. These elastic protagonists risk damnation and dismemberment in a series of improbable slapstick relationships with women, which veer from the titillating to the downright macabre.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

This series of wordless portraits of men is slightly disturbing, especially in its attitude toward women's bodies, but one imagines that's the point. Smiling, mindless women are chopped up by magicians and pulled out in pre-disassembled pieces by psychiatrists. One is tied to train tracks, run over and sewn back together by a cowboy. It's definitely creepy commentary when a naked middle-aged fisherman reels in a naked woman, carefully measures her, then throws her back. But the book feels more like an artistic statement than a narrative, and it's not art for art's sake so much as art as a hammer to whack you with. At its best, it makes one giggle and wince at the same time. At its worst, it's upsetting. The art feels quirky with its frumpy little grayscale men (some pages are toned sepia and others are blue). While not a masterpiece like Delisle's autobiographical comics Pyongyang or Shenzhen, it's worth reading. Much the way he captured the sense of danger in the Communist blandness of North Korea, Delisle's portraits capture something of the sinister blankness of the Western workingman. (Mar.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
School Library Journal

Gr 10 Up -Echoing Delislea's female-centered Aline and the Others (Drawn & Quarterly, 2006), Albert examines the testosterone side of gender. With simple images in muted color, the author has created a compact, wordless story of a character for each letter of the alphabet. Usually absurd, sometimes perverse, and always interesting, these men are a delight to encounter. Take for example Jean-Luc, who is literally divided into two selves following a jealous-girl fight. Each girl then happily carries away, marries, and forms a life with her half of him. Years later, after each pint-size Jean-Luc has lost his respective love, the two meet and forge a drunken reunion in a seedy bar. It is amazing to see what Delisle is able to do in each of these limited-frame stories. This collection, though minimalist, presents some big ideas about culture and the nature of human behavior and relationships. It will be a sure hit for mature teen purveyors of black humor and the thoughtfully macabre.-Shannon Peterson, Kitsap Regional Library, WA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781897299272
Publisher:
Drawn & Quarterly
Publication date:
02/19/2008
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
72
Product dimensions:
6.48(w) x 8.09(h) x 0.34(d)

Meet the Author

Guy Delisle is the critically acclaimed cartoonist behind the graphic novels Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea and Shenzhen: A Travelogue from China.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews