Albert Frey Houses 1 + 2

Overview

Albert Frey worked in Le Corbusier's atelier in Paris, but he is most closely associated with the 1940s and 1950s desert architecture of Southern California, and with the work of architects such as Richard Neutra and John Lautner. This exquisitely designed monograph on Albert Frey focuses on two houses he built for himself in Palm Springs, California, one in 1941 (with an addition in 1953) and the other in 1964. Although both houses have a modern aesthetic, including glass walls and concrete construction, they ...
See more details below
Paperback
$18.04
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$20.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (23) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $10.98   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Albert Frey worked in Le Corbusier's atelier in Paris, but he is most closely associated with the 1940s and 1950s desert architecture of Southern California, and with the work of architects such as Richard Neutra and John Lautner. This exquisitely designed monograph on Albert Frey focuses on two houses he built for himself in Palm Springs, California, one in 1941 (with an addition in 1953) and the other in 1964. Although both houses have a modern aesthetic, including glass walls and concrete construction, they are fully incorporated into their surroundings, in keeping with Frey's principles of paralleling nature in his work. This title, which was developed in collaboration with Frey himself, includes color and duotone photographs commissioned especially for this book. The book is exquisitely made and comes in a plastic slipcase.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Palm Springs posh sprang up in a single moment and shared a single architectural dream: desert modernism--low, glassy, horizontal, sleek. It remains perfect. Kurt Andersen, New Yorker

Frey is a guru who doesn't preach. His belief in a timeless ideal, modernism's truth of function and materials, is evident in every aspect of the design of his house. Diana Ketcham, House & Garden

Interiors
A producer at TBWA Chiat/Day in Los Angeles (and an Emmy winner for Apple's "Think Different" campaign), author Jennifer Golub chooses to honor the guru of the desert modernism Albert Frey mainly through images, rather than words. From his photo album, 8mm films, and the photography of Julius Shulman and Charles Wittenmeier, Golub has constructed a pictorial record of the architect's creative process. To build his 1941 and 1953 houses in Palm Springs, California, Frey, now 95, studied the position of the sun for a year and each site's slope and terrain at least as closely. Several cross-country trips in the 1930s also influenced his sense of aesthetics, color, and functionality. The book flows seamlessly, almost intuitively, and allows the reader to put the pieces together, much as Frey did. (For the more literal-minded, captions are provided at the end of the book.) Golub has also included tow interviews with Frey from 1994 and 1995 which give another perspective of the seemingly reluctant icon. Asked about his principles of design, Frey says simply: "Respect for nature. Establish certain principles. Take advantage of the modern techniques, manufacturers, and what the engineers invent."
Metropolis
Albert Frey died in his sleep at home on Saturday, November 14, a month after he had completed a three-year collaboration on Albert Frey Houses 1 + 2 (Princeton Architectural Press). He was 95. A member of Le Corbusier's atelier, Albert was known for his detailing of the Villa Savoye. He came to the United States in 1930 and brought high Modernism to the desert outside Palm Springs, where he realized residences and civic structures that synthesized his passions for technology and nature in to a romantic ideal of American Modernism-all unaffected sparseness and elegant thrift. Albert documented the construction and completion of his projects himself in photographs and 8mm films. His archive photos, particularly of his travels across America, embody his lifelong fascination with the elegance and efficiency of modern materials and the intersection of the natural and manufactured worlds. But Albert was no futurist, despite the obvious morphological similarities. He continually looked to nature, asking how he could take its highest principles-economy, discipline, functionalism, beauty-and make them fundamental to his architecture. He was still in touch with the colors, forms, and rhythms of nature in his nineties. Visitors to Albert's desert home in recent years stood under a serene blue ceiling that reflected ripples from the pool. The white cotton duck slipcovers were cool to the touch. Albert wore a yellow shirt. Or a peach one with white slacks. If you were there early, he might be feeding the quail. If you stayed toward noon, he placed vegetable bits on a rock for the squirrel and lizard who came daily. As the sun intensified, Albert would draw the yellow curtains and politely ask you to leave so that he could take his nap.
I.D. Annual Design Review
When Swiss-born Architect Albert Frey moved to the United States, in 1930, he traded in the vertical grandeur of his native land for the endless horizon of the California desert. Heavily influenced by the flora, fauna and landscape of Palm Springs, he built a house for himself there in 1941, and followed it up with another in 1964. Praxis's design for Albert Frey: Houses 1+2 won praise for its spot-on appropriateness.

"It's the embodiment of the architecture," said deWilde, who noted that the book's emphatically horizontal trim size "mimics the landscape and the houses." Photographs by Frey, Julius Shulman and Charles Wittenmeier—in elegiac black-and-white and muted colors-emphasize the architect's thoughtful blending of nature and culture and show the evolving, experimental character of his "living laboratories." Praxis's type choice, Akzidenz Grotesk Extended was also met with approval by the jurors, who felt that its spareness echoed the desert's stark beauty.

The colors of the desert-and Frey's architecture-are a visual leitmotif throughout. Soft yellows, greens, pinks and blues punctuate the photographs and architectural documentation. "I wouldn't use that color if you paid me," Doyle cracked, in reference to the peachy-pink hue of the book's cover. "But it really does work here."-I.D. Annual Design Review

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781568981901
  • Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/1999
  • Pages: 84
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.87 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Jennifer Golub is a producer at the Chiat/Day advertising firm's Los Angeles office.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)