Alcibiades and the Socratic Lover-Educator

Overview

In the Platonic work Alcibiades I, a divinely guided Socrates adopts the guise of a lover in order to divert Alcibiades from an unthinking political career. The contributors to this carefully focussed volume cover aspects of the background to the work; its arguments and the philosophical issues it raises; its relationship to other Platonic texts, and its subsequent history up to the time of the Neoplatonists. Despite its ancient prominence, its authorship is still unsettled; the essays and two appendices, one ...
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Overview

In the Platonic work Alcibiades I, a divinely guided Socrates adopts the guise of a lover in order to divert Alcibiades from an unthinking political career. The contributors to this carefully focussed volume cover aspects of the background to the work; its arguments and the philosophical issues it raises; its relationship to other Platonic texts, and its subsequent history up to the time of the Neoplatonists. Despite its ancient prominence, its authorship is still unsettled; the essays and two appendices, one historical and one stylometric, come together to suggest answers to this tantalising question.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780715640869
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 2/16/2012
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Marguerite Johnson is Senior Lecturer in Classics, University of Newcastle, Australia.
Harold Tarrant is Professor of Classics, University of Newcastle, Australia.

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Table of Contents

Introduction Harold Tarrant and Marguerite Johnson

The role of Eros in Improving the Pupil, or What Socrates Learned from Sappho Marguerite Johnson (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Socrates and Models of Platonic Love Dougal Blyth (University of Auckland, New Zealand)

The Eye of the Beloved: Opsis and Eros in Socratic Pedagogy Victoria Wohl (University of Toronto, Canada)

Plato's Oblique Response to Issues of Socrates' Influence on Alcibiades: An Examination of the Protagoras and the Gorgias Reuben Ramsey (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Socratic Ignorance, or the Place of the Alcibiades I in Plato's Early Works Yuji Kurihara (Gakugei University, Tokyo)

Did Alcibiades Learn Justice from the Many?
Joe Mintoff (University of Newcastle, Australia)

The Dual-Role Philosophers: An Exploration of a Failed Relationship Anthony Hooper

Authenticity, Experiment or Development: The Alcibiades I on Virtue and Courage Eugenio Benitez (University of Sydney, Australia)

Revaluing Megalopsuchia: Reflections on the Alcibiades II Matthew Sharpe (University of Melbourne, Australia)

Improvement by Love: From Aeschines to the Old Academy Harold Tarrant (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Ice-Cold in Alex: Philo's Treatment of the Divine Lover in Hellenistic Pedagogy Fergus King (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Proclus' Reading of Plato's Sôkratikoi Logoi: Proclus' Observations on Dialectic at Alcibiades 112d-114e and Elsewhere Akitsugu Taki (Josai International University)

Socrates' Divine Sign: From the Alcibiades to Olympiodorus François Renaud (Université de Moncton)

'The Individual' in History and History 'in General':
Alcibiades, Philosophical History and Ideas in Contest Neil Morpeth (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Appendix 1. Fourth-Century Politics and the Date of the Alcibiades I Elizabeth Baynham and Harold Tarrant 0
Appendix 2. Report on the Working Vocabulary in the Doubtful Dialogues Harold Tarrant and Terry Roberts a. The Working Vocabulary of the Alcibiades b. The Working Vocabulary of the Theages Bibliography Index

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