Alexander, Who's Trying His Best to Be the Best Boy Ever
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Alexander, Who's Trying His Best to Be the Best Boy Ever

by Judith Viorst, Isidre Mones
     
 

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Alexander tries his hand at behaving in this hilarious companion to the bestselling classic Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.

Last night somebody ate a whole box of jelly donuts. That somebody woke up with a terrible bellyache, and that somebody’s mom found the empty box and told that somebody that there are going to be

Overview

Alexander tries his hand at behaving in this hilarious companion to the bestselling classic Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.

Last night somebody ate a whole box of jelly donuts. That somebody woke up with a terrible bellyache, and that somebody’s mom found the empty box and told that somebody that there are going to be consequences.

That somebody is Alexander, and Alexander really hates consequences.

So from now on, he is going to try his best to be the Best Boy Ever. For the complete and entire rest of his life. Starting right this very minute.

But there are all sorts of things that you can’t do when you’re being the Best Boy Ever. Fun things. Very important things. Things that Alexander might—just might—like a little bit more than he hates consequences.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
06/30/2014
After the consequences of eating an entire box of jelly doughnuts hit home, Viorst’s iconic redheaded hero makes a big decision: “Starting this very minute,” he tells his family, “I am being the best boy ever for the complete and entire rest of my life.” In the week that follows, Saint Augustine has nothing on Alexander, who must refrain from bouncing his basketball indoors or dumping spaghetti on his brothers when they taunt him. What’s more, he astutely observes, the world isn’t exactly brimming with positive reinforcement: “Ms. Klimpt says I’m wearing her out and that she’ll give me extra credit if only I would please stop raising my hand.” Eventually, Alexander opts for the dark side, because, “the complete and entire rest of my life, I’m all of sudden thinking, is a long time.” Working in the style of Ray Cruz, Monés falls a little short of his expressiveness and comic range, and Alexander looks almost prepubescent in many pages. But Viorst’s Runyonesque ruminations on the nature of good and evil in a kid’s world are as funny as ever. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)
Kirkus Reviews
2014-07-16
Alexander eats an entire box of doughnuts and hides the empty box in almost plain sight. Alexander, of the beloved Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good, Very Bad Day (1972), is back, and he's as clueless as ever, with grandiose plans that always seem to end in disaster. He must now face the consequences of his latest escapade. He's banned from playing video games or watching TV, and he's left out of a family outing. He hates consequences. To avoid further punishments, he announces that he will never get in trouble again and that he will be good forever. Although he keeps getting great ideas, he manages, barely, to hold on and keep his promise. Of course this cannot go on for long, and his attempts at exemplary behavior are doomed as he careens from one hilarious mess to another and finally gives in to temptation. Alexander narrates his own tale of woe in an illogical, impish and delightful stream of consciousness. Although in his case, it is more apt to be unconsciousness. Viorst totally understands how little boys think and react and keeps Alexander fresh and appealing. Monés' fine-lined, black-and-white illustrations pay homage to Ray Cruz's style from the original work, but they have their own liveliness and charm. Welcome back, Alexander. (Picture book. 4-9)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Irrepressible Alexander, hero of three of Viorst’s unforgettable tales, returns to relate his efforts to be “the Best Boy Ever.” He decides this after finishing a whole box of doughnuts one night, waking up with a bellyache, and suffering “consequences” from his angry mother. And so the lengthy, humorous text takes us through the week of his struggles, trying his best. He does not disturb the family on Sunday. He amazes his teacher Ms. Klimpt on Monday; he restrains himself in a soccer game and at dinner on Tuesday; and so the week goes, as he loses it a bit while still trying on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. But by Saturday, Alexander reconsiders whether he can, or wants to, keep it up. In naturalistic pen, ink, and watercolor illustrations from detailed vignettes to double pages, only Alexander, an appealing rogue, is in color while everything else is sketched in black on white. His emotions are clear as we root for him to manage being “Best Boy Ever.” Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz; Ages 4 to 8.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781481423533
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
08/26/2014
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
498,173
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
AD1010L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Judith Viorst was born and brought up in New Jersey, graduated from Rutgers University, moved to Greenwich Village, and has lived in Washington, DC, since 1960, when she married Milton Viorst, a political writer. They have three sons and seven grandchildren. A graduate in 1981 of the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute, Viorst writes in many different areas: science books, children’s chapter and picture books—including the beloved Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, which has sold some four million copies—adult fiction and nonfiction—including the New York Times bestseller, Necessary Losses—poetry for children and adults, and four musicals. Her most recent book of poetry for adults, Wait For Me and Other Poems About the Irritations and Consolations of a Long Marriage, was published by Simon & Schuster in 2015. Her most recent book of poetry for children, What Are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About? was published in 2016 by Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books.

Isidre Monés is a Spanish artist best known for his comic book work. In addition to illustrating Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 3, he has also illustrated several of Cynthia Rylant’s Henry and Mudge stories.

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