Alice in Tumblr-land: And Other Fairy Tales for a New Generation [NOOK Book]

Overview

Disney meets Lena Dunham in this illustrated humor book featuring your favorite fairy-tale characters dating and finding their way in 21st-century America



The Ugly Duckling still feels gross compared to everyone else, but now she’s ...
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Alice in Tumblr-land: And Other Fairy Tales for a New Generation

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Overview

Disney meets Lena Dunham in this illustrated humor book featuring your favorite fairy-tale characters dating and finding their way in 21st-century America



The Ugly Duckling still feels gross compared to everyone else, but now she’s got Instagram, and there’s this one filter that makes her look awesome. Cinderella swaps her glass slippers for Crocs. The Tortoise and the Hare Facebook stalk each other. Goldilocks goes gluten free. And Peter Pan finally has to grow up and get a job, or at least start paying rent.



Here are more than one hundred fairy tales, illustrated and re-imagined for today. Instead of fairy godmothers, there’s Siri. And rather than big bad wolves, there are creepy dudes on OkCupid. In our brave new world of social networking, YouTube, and texting, fairy tales can once again lead us to “happily ever after”—and have us laughing all the way.


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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
12/02/2013
Popular blogger Manley updates the adventures of revered fairy tale characters, turning them into self-involved, Internet-addicted, hipster Millenials in short story fragments and clever illustrations. Sleeping Beauty is re-imagined as a wine-soaked depressive and Cinderella explores her artistic side. Ever the freeloader, Goldilocks steals her friends' French fries before asking, "‘Wait, does this have gluten in it?'" Little Red Riding Hood laments her bad luck with men including the wolves on OkCupid and a blind date with James Franco. An alienated Little Mermaid applies to grad school where she is depicted reading a book titled "Post-Colonialism and the Gendered Fin." She goes on to start a nonprofit "to fight for the rights of mercitizens." Pinnocchio's nose outs him in a series of lies to his professor, potential employer, and the police, before he finally funnels his deceit into a safer outlet—his own Wikipedia page. Chicken Little learns therapeutic "coping strategies" for her crippling chronic anxiety. These stories highlight Manley's satirical wit, but also his heart. Readers will cheer on these familiar protagonists through their crises and quandaries, and probably relate more than they might like to admit. (Nov.)
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-01
Fairy-tale princes and princesses get a postmodern makeover in this wry but slight reimagining. Writer and illustrator Manley cribs much of the material here from his Tumblr feed, Fairy Tales for Twenty-Somethings, matching brief observations on classic characters with simple, sometimes emotionally effective line drawings. The pieces are brief and mostly self-contained, although a few characters (The Ugly Duckling, Cinderella, Alice in Wonderland) get extended story arcs based on their idiosyncrasies and particular challenges, which feels a bit like tossing a Disney princess into the cast of HBO's Girls. The characters are mostly cynical, although a few can be touching--see the "funemployed" Hansel and Gretel, perpetually alone together in the woods, or a gay Arthur hugging it out with Sir Lancelot. You'll find Cinderella writing herself empowering Post-its: "You are in control of your own future. You are capable of amazing things," immediately followed by "And fuck anyone who says otherwise." The Tortoise and the Hare also have an interesting arc, with their lifelong competition played out in public. "It wasn't until they were each about to fall asleep that night that it hit them at the same time: There is no destination. There isn't a winner. There was never a race," Manley writes. The illustrations are entertaining--the worried Chicken Little, next to a bottle of Xanax that reads "Take one any time you do anything," is a highlight. From Red Riding Hood and her vibrator ("Lil' Red") to Beauty's and the Beast's sexting addictions, these fractured fairy tales may not be for everyone, but they are crafty. Not as poignant as Bill Willingham's Fables series, but a cool, PG-13 revisiting of classic stories. For readers who grew up with the Internet, they may strike a chord.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698136212
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 11/5/2013
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 143,926
  • File size: 69 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author


Tim Manley is a writer and illustrator and the creator of the blog Fairy Tales for Twenty-Somethings. He has won the Moth StorySLAM, taught high school English at New York City's School of the Future, and served as a mentor with the PEN American Center's Prison Writing Program. Born in 1985 on Long Island, he lives in Queens, New York.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2013

    This book speaks earnestly, and with a humor and delicacy that i

    This book speaks earnestly, and with a humor and delicacy that is exactly our generation. Absolutely worth the read.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2013

    Butt

    Butt

    8 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2014

    screaming oh my god

    I want to read this book this sounds hilarious

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2013

    cece-layne thompson @diqdyed_cuqcake

    Heyyooo
    Great book...
    If you even care anymore...
    I'm a tumblr girl
    I'm ugly and fat but I'm still a tumblr girl
    How has your lyfe been?
    Baiiii now

    2 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    This is what I've been waiting for

    It fits out generation like a glove and is perf. ( if you have teh time follow tumblr user i-wish-gee-would-notice-me)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

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