Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass

Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass

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by Lewis Carroll, John Speirs
     
 

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When Alice tumbles down, down, down a rabbit-hole one hot summer's afternoon in pursuit of a White Rabbit she finds herself in Wonderland. And there begin the fantastical adventures that will see her experiencing extraordinary changes in size, swimming in a pool of her own tears and attending the very maddest of tea parties. For Wonderland is no ordinary place and

Overview

When Alice tumbles down, down, down a rabbit-hole one hot summer's afternoon in pursuit of a White Rabbit she finds herself in Wonderland. And there begin the fantastical adventures that will see her experiencing extraordinary changes in size, swimming in a pool of her own tears and attending the very maddest of tea parties. For Wonderland is no ordinary place and the characters that populate it are quite unlike anybody young Alice has ever met before. In this imaginary land she encounters the savagely violent Queen, the Lachrymose Mock Turtle, the laconic Cheshire Cat and the hookah-smoking Caterpillar, each as surprising and outlandish as the next. Alice's adventures have made her the stuff of legend, the child heroine par excellence, and ensured that Carroll's book is the best loved and most widely read in children's literature.

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, celebrated under his pseudonym Lewis Carroll, was born in 1832, the third in a large and talented family of eleven children. His fascination with word games, puzzles and writing was evident from an early age. He was educated at Rugby School and then Christ Church, Oxford, where he was later appointed lecturer in mathematics and subsequently spent the rest of his life. Alongside his academic life he pursued a career both as a writer and an accomplished amateur photographer. His most famous works are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), its sequel Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871) and The Hunting of the Snark (1876). He died, unmarried, in 1898.

The handsome volumes in The Collectors Library present great works of world literature in a handy hardback format. Printed on high-quality paper and bound in real cloth, each complete and unabridged volume has a specially commissioned afterword, brief biography of the author and a further-reading list. This easily accessible series offers readers the perfect opportunity to discover, or rediscover, some of the world's most endearing literary works.

The volumes in The Collector's Library are sumptuously produced, enduring editions to own, to collect and to treasure.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Zwerger's (The Wizard of Oz) captivating cover image of the Mad Tea-Party for this edition of Carroll's 1865 tale conveys the psychological tension of the interior artwork: Alice, at the head of an elongated table with a pristine white linen cloth, stares at the pocket watch that the March Hare is about to lower into his cup of tea. The Hare, bug-eyed, gazes out at readers while the Mad Hatter to his right, wearing a hat box, fixates on a black upturned chapeau (in lieu of a place setting), and the Dormouse between them sleeps. Across the table, an empty red mug is placed in front of a vacant green chair, and a teacup and saucer trimmed in red seems to be set for the reader. The painting conveys the way in which Zwerger brilliantly manages both to invite readers into the story and to keep them at a distance. From the heroine's first appearance, as she falls down a well while chasing the White Rabbit, with a glimpse of orderly bookshelves at the upper left corner, Zwerger demonstrates the many layers to Alice's journey: a cutaway view reveals that the bulk of the other "shelves" are the result of rats and insects tunneling underground. The supporting cast conveys the artist's nearly sardonic perspective. The contrary caterpillar, with six of its eight arms crossed, would be at home in New York's East Village: instead of a hookah it smokes a cigarette and sips red wine, yet--unlike Sir John Tenniel's sedated counterpart--this caterpillar is lucid, defiantly staring out at an Alice (and readers) absent from the scene. Zwerger's penetrating interpretation reinvents Carroll's situations and characters and demands a rereading of the text. All ages. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Charles Dodgson wrote this story at the request of Alice Liddell, and for close to 150 years, it has been a favorite of young readers. Lisbeth Zwerger brings her award-winning artistic skill to the story and offers a very different look for a new generation. Her palette is brighter, the art has more of a layered look than in her previous works, and she offers more frontal views. The whimsy is there and the White Rabbit, Queen, Cheshire Cat and others will be quickly recognized. The illustrations range from full pages to spot art liberally sprinkled throughout the twelve chapters. The story can be read on one level as a magical adventure in which Alice faces a host of very strange things and variety of bizarre characters. It fills a child's need for fantasy and escape. The actual social commentary and satire will elude most contemporary readers, but it in no way diminishes the joy of reading this classic story.
Children's Literature
Originally released in 1865, this book is a timeless classic. This edition, illustrated by Ralph Steadman, which first came out in 1968 but has been out of print for a long time making it somewhat of a rarity, has been carefully restored. Carroll's ironic tale, with the familiar cast of characters (Alice, the White Rabbit, the Dodo, the White Hare, the Cheshire Cat, the Dormouse, the Hatter, the Queen and King, the Mock Turtle, the Gryphon). takes on a bizarre life of its own with Steadman's black and white illustrations. Children who have been accustomed to the Disney version of this classic will be curious, confused yet amazed by what they read and see in this book (perhaps some adults as well). Steadman also created the hand carved wood cuts that make the title and chapter numbers. The illustrator started his career as a children's book illustrator and cartoonist in 1956 and since then has had his distinctive drawings in print internationally. Recommended. 2003, Firefly Books, Ages 8 up.
— Cindy L. Carolan

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671456498
Publisher:
Silver Burdett Press
Publication date:
09/28/1982
Pages:
256
Age Range:
5 Years

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER I

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE

ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do. Once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it - "And what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations?"

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid) whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! oh dear! I shall be too late!" (When she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural.) But when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat pocket, and looked at it and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat pocket or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down - so suddenly, that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything. Then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and bookshelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labeled "ORANGE MARMALADE," but to her great disappointment it was empty. She did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

"Well!" thought Alice to herself, "after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling downstairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!" (Which was very likely true.) Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? "I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?" she said aloud. "I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think." (For, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over.) "Yes, that's about the right distance. But then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?" (Alice had not the slightest idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but she thought they were nice, grand words to say.)

Presently she began again. "I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think" - (she was rather glad there was no one listening this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) - "but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know - please, ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?" (and she tried to curtsy as she spoke - fancy curtsying as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) "And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere."

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. "Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!" (Dinah was the cat.) "I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. - Dinah, my dear, I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. - But do cats eat bats, I wonder?" And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, "Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?" and sometimes, "Do bats eat cats?" for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her very earnestly, "Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?" when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment. She looked up, but it was all dark overhead. Before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost. Away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, "Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!" She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

Meet the Author


Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-98), or Lewis Carroll as he was better known, was a lecturer in Mathematics at Oxford University when he wrote Alice in Wonderland (1865), and later Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There (1871) for Alice Liddell. Mervyn Peake (1911-68) was an artist and writer. In addition to Treasure Island and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, he also illustrated Household Tales by the Brothers Grimm and The Hunting of the Snark. His novels include the Gormenghast trilogy - Titus Groan, Gormenghast and Titus Alone - and Mr Pye.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
January 27, 1832
Date of Death:
January 14, 1898
Place of Birth:
Daresbury, Cheshire, England
Place of Death:
Guildford, Surrey, England
Education:
Richmond School, Christ Church College, Oxford University, B.A., 1854; M.A., 1857
Website:
http://www.lewis-carroll-birthplace.org.uk/

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Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Classic Starts Series) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have a copy of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass which was given to me on my seventh birthday. I found it fascinating. My grandmother gave me a copy along with a harmonica. The harmonica was lost long ago, the book remains and has always had a place in my heart. I was too young to read the entire book, so my father started reading this book to me. Perhaps still having this book has given me a connection to the past. I laugh when I reminisce about my father (who is now 70) singing ¿Beautiful Soup,¿ most beautifully I must add. He also recited ¿Jabberwocky¿ and I can still hear his voice as he read the tale of the Walrus: ¿The time has come,¿ the Walrus said, ¿To talk of many things: Of shoes and ships and sealing wax of cabbages and kings and why the sea is boiling hot and whether pigs have wings.¿ The Mad Tea Party is also very memorable. There is all kinds of nonsense talk children will love to try to figure out, and as adults still might be trying to figure out! They will love the riddles and beautiful illustrations. The mouse, the chess pieces and the Cheshire cat talk most intelligently about various concerns in Wonderland. Just as everything in a child¿s world is sometimes alive to them, so Alice¿s world is filled with things that are alive and most interesting to children. Alice never seems to run out of adventures. The Looking Glass House is amusing to me as it has a cute black kitten who is quite mischievous. I quote: ¿Oh, you wicked, wicked little thing!¿ cried Alice catching up the kitten and giving it a little kiss to make it understand that it was in disgrace. ¿Really, Dinah ought to have taught you better manners! ¿¿. Kitty sat very demurely on her knee, pretending to watch the progress of the winding, and now and then putting out one paw and gently touching the ball, as if it would be glad to help if it might. John Tenniel¿s illustrations make the book and together he and Lewis Carroll created a magical world for children to explore. I hope you will read this book to your children, read them many books about many things. They will always thank you for it. Thank you Dad, I love you! You have given me so many things, and I thank you for my love of reading. I dedicate this review to my dad who will always live eternally with me as long as I have this book tucked safely away.
barbieleejay More than 1 year ago
Without a doubt a Classic in it own. My daughter loves it and she is !7yrs old. It will entertain ages 0-99..Great investment to add to a home library.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book Alice in Wonderland is a very good book. I think that it is a very good book because it is really interesting. It is a really interesting book because it's about this girl who dreams of the craziest things. In my opinion the author which is Lewis Caroll has a very creative and interesting mind. It's amazing how a person could come up with such an idea. If you were an adult that reads the book for the first time, you would think that this girl Alice is on drugs to dream of such things. If you dont think that Alice is on drugs then youll probably think that the author who wrote this book is on drugs. I know that there are a lot of books based on this title, but to me this book is the most original and best one. The book has been around for a while and still selling. The reason why is because it is such a great book. So just dont take my word for it, do some research if you dont believe me. I would defenitely recommend this book to anyone who likes fiction stories of any kind. I bet that this book would really get the attention of kids. So I also recommend this book to childeren. Childeren are not the only people i recommend it to but adults as well. Childeren and adults of all ages who love fiction are guaranteed by my experience and knowlege to really love this book as well as i do. I rate this book four out of five stars. The reason I rate this book four out of five instead of five out of five is because it could have been a little better if the authour would just have made the story a little shorter that way children wont get board. Because as we all know there are more children that will read this book than adults.
Guest More than 1 year ago
ok so as being a fifteen year old grew up loving alice in wonderland. Apparently this book is an acid trip relating to the song White rabbit by Jefferson aiplane says my mom. but the song and movie are great so when i get the chance im picking up this book immediateley.
Guest More than 1 year ago
okay, so i realize that Alice in Wonderland seems like a book for little kids and not someone that's 11 or 12 (I read it last year), but I have still wanted to read it since I learned that it was a book and not just a disney movie. But I was so wrong, it's not even funny. Alice in Wonderland is for any age of person- boy or girl- and is about a girl that has crazy adventures in wonderland. And everything, even if it seems weird- think about it- makes sense. Have you thought about it? Even if the mad hatter and the march hair are terrible and rude, they're also very funny and hares in march are said to be crazy as hatters used to be (just all the time- not just in March)everything is like that. i would reccommend this to anyone and everyone ages 0-????? i think it's healthy for people to read something like thisat least once a month.
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