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Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass
     

Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

4.2 38
by Lewis Carroll, Shelly Frasier (Narrated by), Renee Raudman (Narrated by)
 

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Originally published in the mid-1800s, Lewis Carroll's masterpiece Alice in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking Glass, have delighted children and adults alike for well over one hundred years. Alice's strange and wonderful adventures are now available together in this unabridged audiobook package.

English writer and mathematician Charles Lutwidge

Overview

Originally published in the mid-1800s, Lewis Carroll's masterpiece Alice in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking Glass, have delighted children and adults alike for well over one hundred years. Alice's strange and wonderful adventures are now available together in this unabridged audiobook package.

English writer and mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who wrote under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, was especially known for his children's books Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. Besides being classic children's entertainment, they are also distinguished for their satire and verbal wit.The son of a vicar, Carroll was a precocious child who showed early interest in both writing and mathematics. He studied mathematics and was appointed to a lectureship at Christ Church, Oxford. Carroll continued studying and prepared for holy orders for almost thirty years. Although he took deacon's orders in 1861, Carroll was never ordained as a priest. A shy retiring bachelor, Carroll was happiest in the company of children, and his favorite was Alice Liddell, daughter of the dean of Christ Church. On a boating trip up the river Isis, Carroll told Alice and her three older sisters a story of "Alice's Adventures Underground," weaving into it many of the places and things they'd seen on their outings together. Alice was enchanted by the story and begged him to write it down. By the following February, Carroll had written a first draft and decided to publish it as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Although he wrote a wide range of other books, including many on the subject of advanced mathematics, he is best remembered for his children's classics. In addition to narrating audiobooks, Shelly Frasier has appeared in many independent film and theater projects in Arizona and southern California and has developed character voices for animation projects and voiceover work for commercials. She trained at the Groundlings Improv School in Hollywood and South Coast Reperatory's Professional Conservatory in Costa Mesa, California. She has performed at theaters throughout North Hollywood and Orange County. Recent performances include Blue Window, The Battle of Bull Run Always Makes Me Cry, The Haunting of Hill House, and a British farcical version of A Christmas Carol. She resides in Hollywood. Renee Raudman is a multi-award-winning audiobook narrator. A multiple Audie Award nominee, she has earned a number of AudioFile Earphones Awards, including for The Last Secret by Mary McGarry Morris and Wesley the Owl by Stacey O'Brien, as well as a Publishers Weekly Listen-Up Award for Joe Schreiber's Chasing the Dead. She has also performed on film, TV, radio, and stage, including the recurring roles of Jordon on ABC's One Life To Live, Phyllis on NBC's Passions, and guest-starring roles on prime-time TV. She has been heard in cartoons (The Simpsons, Billy & Mandy), videogames, and on the E! channel. Her narration of Homer's Odyssey by Gwen Cooper was selected by Library Journal as one of the best audiobooks of 2009, and her reading of Marthe Jocelyn's Would You was selected by the ALA as one of the best young adult audiobooks of 2009.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Zwerger's (The Wizard of Oz) captivating cover image of the Mad Tea-Party for this edition of Carroll's 1865 tale conveys the psychological tension of the interior artwork: Alice, at the head of an elongated table with a pristine white linen cloth, stares at the pocket watch that the March Hare is about to lower into his cup of tea. The Hare, bug-eyed, gazes out at readers while the Mad Hatter to his right, wearing a hat box, fixates on a black upturned chapeau (in lieu of a place setting), and the Dormouse between them sleeps. Across the table, an empty red mug is placed in front of a vacant green chair, and a teacup and saucer trimmed in red seems to be set for the reader. The painting conveys the way in which Zwerger brilliantly manages both to invite readers into the story and to keep them at a distance. From the heroine's first appearance, as she falls down a well while chasing the White Rabbit, with a glimpse of orderly bookshelves at the upper left corner, Zwerger demonstrates the many layers to Alice's journey: a cutaway view reveals that the bulk of the other "shelves" are the result of rats and insects tunneling underground. The supporting cast conveys the artist's nearly sardonic perspective. The contrary caterpillar, with six of its eight arms crossed, would be at home in New York's East Village: instead of a hookah it smokes a cigarette and sips red wine, yet--unlike Sir John Tenniel's sedated counterpart--this caterpillar is lucid, defiantly staring out at an Alice (and readers) absent from the scene. Zwerger's penetrating interpretation reinvents Carroll's situations and characters and demands a rereading of the text. All ages. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Charles Dodgson wrote this story at the request of Alice Liddell, and for close to 150 years, it has been a favorite of young readers. Lisbeth Zwerger brings her award-winning artistic skill to the story and offers a very different look for a new generation. Her palette is brighter, the art has more of a layered look than in her previous works, and she offers more frontal views. The whimsy is there and the White Rabbit, Queen, Cheshire Cat and others will be quickly recognized. The illustrations range from full pages to spot art liberally sprinkled throughout the twelve chapters. The story can be read on one level as a magical adventure in which Alice faces a host of very strange things and variety of bizarre characters. It fills a child's need for fantasy and escape. The actual social commentary and satire will elude most contemporary readers, but it in no way diminishes the joy of reading this classic story.
Children's Literature
Originally released in 1865, this book is a timeless classic. This edition, illustrated by Ralph Steadman, which first came out in 1968 but has been out of print for a long time making it somewhat of a rarity, has been carefully restored. Carroll's ironic tale, with the familiar cast of characters (Alice, the White Rabbit, the Dodo, the White Hare, the Cheshire Cat, the Dormouse, the Hatter, the Queen and King, the Mock Turtle, the Gryphon). takes on a bizarre life of its own with Steadman's black and white illustrations. Children who have been accustomed to the Disney version of this classic will be curious, confused yet amazed by what they read and see in this book (perhaps some adults as well). Steadman also created the hand carved wood cuts that make the title and chapter numbers. The illustrator started his career as a children's book illustrator and cartoonist in 1956 and since then has had his distinctive drawings in print internationally. Recommended. 2003, Firefly Books, Ages 8 up.
— Cindy L. Carolan

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781400120277
Publisher:
Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date:
02/15/2010
Edition description:
Unabridged, 5 CDs, 6 hours
Sales rank:
704,201
Product dimensions:
6.52(w) x 5.54(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

Read an Excerpt

From Tan Lin's Introduction to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There pursue what lies beyond and down rabbit holes and on reverse sides of mirrors. But mainly their subject is what comes after, and in this sense the books are allegories about what a child can know and come to know. This quest, as in many great works of literature, unwinds against a larger backdrop: what can and what cannot be known at a particular historical moment, a moment that in Lewis Carroll's case preceded both Freud's speculations on the unconscious and Heisenberg's formulation of the uncertainty principle. Yet because the books were written by a teacher of mathematics who was also a reverend, they are also concerned with what can and cannot be taught to a child who has an infinite faith in the goodness and good sense of the world. But Alice's quest for knowledge, her desire to become something (a grown-up) she is not, is inverted. The books are not conventional quest romances in which Alice matures, overcomes obstacles, and eventually gains wisdom. For when Alice arrives in Wonderland, she is already the most reasonable creature there. She is wiser than any lesson books are able to teach her to be. More important, she is eminently more reasonable than her own feelings will allow her to express. What comes after for Alice? Near the end of Through the Looking Glass, the White Queen tells Alice, "Something's going to happen!"

Quests for mastery are continually frustrated in the Alice books. In comparison with the ever—sane Alice, it is the various Wonderland creatures who appear to be ridiculous, coiners of abstract word games. Yet Carroll also frustrates, with equal precision, Alice's more reasonable human desires. Why, after all, cannot Alice know why the Mad Hatter is mad? Or why will Alice never get to 20 in her multiplication tables? In Carroll, the logic of mathematical proofs runs counter to the logic of reasonable human desire—and neither logic is easily mastered. To his radical epistemological doubt, Carroll added a healthy dose of skepticism for the conventional children's story—a story that in his day came packaged with a moral aim and treated the child as an innocent or tabula rasa upon which the morals and knowledge of the adult could be tidily imprinted.

Alice embodies an idea Freud would later develop at length: What Alice the child already knows, the adult has yet to learn. Or to be more precise, what Alice has not yet forgotten, the adult has yet to remember as something that is by nature unforgettable. In other words, in Alice childhood fantasy meets the reality of adulthood, which to the child looks as unreal and unreasonable as a Cheshire Cat's grin or a Queen who yells "Off with her head!" But even as she calls adult reality unreal, Alice, as the most reasonable creature in her unreasonable dreams, doesn't quite yet realize that the adult's sense of reality has already taken up residence in her. The principal dream of most children—the dream within the dream, as it were—is the dream of not dreaming any longer, the dream of growing up. For the adult, the outlook is reversed. The adult's quest is an inverted one: to find those desires again, in more reasonable forms—and this involves forgetting the original childhood desires (to become an adult) in order to remember them as an adult. The psychoanalyst Adam Phillips notes: "Freud is not really saying that we are really children, but that the sensual intensities of childhood cannot be abolished, that our ideals are transformed versions of childhood pleasures. Looking forward . . . is a paradoxical form of looking back. The future is where one retrieves the pleasures, the bodily pleasures of the past."1 The Alice books manage to show both these quests—that of the child to look forward, and of the adult to look back—simultaneously, as mirror logics of each other.

Like both Freud and the surrealists, Carroll implicitly understood that a child's emotions and desires appear omnipotent and boundless to the child—and thus make the adult's forgetting of them difficult if not illogical. Growing up poses psychological and logical absurdities. The quandary of a logically grounded knowledge constituted out of an illogical universe pervades both books. The questions that Alice asks are not answered by the animals in Wonderland nor by anyone after she wakens. It is likely that her questions don't have answers or that there are no right questions to ask. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass remain the most prophetic of the nineteenth century's anti-narratives, inverted quest romances, circular mathematical treatises on the illogical logic of forgetting one's desires. They display a logic that the child must master in order to grow up. As the White Queen remarks of the Red Queen: "She's in that state of mind . . . that she wants to deny something—only she doesn't know what to deny!"

Meet the Author

English writer and mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who wrote under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, was especially known for his children's books Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. Besides being classic children's entertainment, they are also distinguished for their satire and verbal wit.The son of a vicar, Carroll was a precocious child who showed early interest in both writing and mathematics. He studied mathematics and was appointed to a lectureship at Christ Church, Oxford. Carroll continued studying and prepared for holy orders for almost thirty years. Although he took deacon's orders in 1861, Carroll was never ordained as a priest. A shy retiring bachelor, Carroll was happiest in the company of children, and his favorite was Alice Liddell, daughter of the dean of Christ Church. On a boating trip up the river Isis, Carroll told Alice and her three older sisters a story of "Alice's Adventures Underground," weaving into it many of the places and things they'd seen on their outings together. Alice was enchanted by the story and begged him to write it down. By the following February, Carroll had written a first draft and decided to publish it as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Although he wrote a wide range of other books, including many on the subject of advanced mathematics, he is best remembered for his children's classics. In addition to narrating audiobooks, Shelly Frasier has appeared in many independent film and theater projects in Arizona and southern California and has developed character voices for animation projects and voiceover work for commercials. She trained at the Groundlings Improv School in Hollywood and South Coast Reperatory's Professional Conservatory in Costa Mesa, California. She has performed at theaters throughout North Hollywood and Orange County. Recent performances include Blue Window, The Battle of Bull Run Always Makes Me Cry, The Haunting of Hill House, and a British farcical version of A Christmas Carol. She resides in Hollywood. Renee Raudman is a multi-award-winning audiobook narrator. A multiple Audie Award nominee, she has earned a number of AudioFile Earphones Awards, including for The Last Secret by Mary McGarry Morris and Wesley the Owl by Stacey O'Brien, as well as a Publishers Weekly Listen-Up Award for Joe Schreiber's Chasing the Dead. She has also performed on film, TV, radio, and stage, including the recurring roles of Jordon on ABC's One Life To Live, Phyllis on NBC's Passions, and guest-starring roles on prime-time TV. She has been heard in cartoons (The Simpsons, Billy & Mandy), videogames, and on the E! channel. Her narration of Homer's Odyssey by Gwen Cooper was selected by Library Journal as one of the best audiobooks of 2009, and her reading of Marthe Jocelyn's Would You was selected by the ALA as one of the best young adult audiobooks of 2009.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
January 27, 1832
Date of Death:
January 14, 1898
Place of Birth:
Daresbury, Cheshire, England
Place of Death:
Guildford, Surrey, England
Education:
Richmond School, Christ Church College, Oxford University, B.A., 1854; M.A., 1857
Website:
http://www.lewis-carroll-birthplace.org.uk/

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Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Classic Starts Series) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have a copy of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass which was given to me on my seventh birthday. I found it fascinating. My grandmother gave me a copy along with a harmonica. The harmonica was lost long ago, the book remains and has always had a place in my heart. I was too young to read the entire book, so my father started reading this book to me. Perhaps still having this book has given me a connection to the past. I laugh when I reminisce about my father (who is now 70) singing ¿Beautiful Soup,¿ most beautifully I must add. He also recited ¿Jabberwocky¿ and I can still hear his voice as he read the tale of the Walrus: ¿The time has come,¿ the Walrus said, ¿To talk of many things: Of shoes and ships and sealing wax of cabbages and kings and why the sea is boiling hot and whether pigs have wings.¿ The Mad Tea Party is also very memorable. There is all kinds of nonsense talk children will love to try to figure out, and as adults still might be trying to figure out! They will love the riddles and beautiful illustrations. The mouse, the chess pieces and the Cheshire cat talk most intelligently about various concerns in Wonderland. Just as everything in a child¿s world is sometimes alive to them, so Alice¿s world is filled with things that are alive and most interesting to children. Alice never seems to run out of adventures. The Looking Glass House is amusing to me as it has a cute black kitten who is quite mischievous. I quote: ¿Oh, you wicked, wicked little thing!¿ cried Alice catching up the kitten and giving it a little kiss to make it understand that it was in disgrace. ¿Really, Dinah ought to have taught you better manners! ¿¿. Kitty sat very demurely on her knee, pretending to watch the progress of the winding, and now and then putting out one paw and gently touching the ball, as if it would be glad to help if it might. John Tenniel¿s illustrations make the book and together he and Lewis Carroll created a magical world for children to explore. I hope you will read this book to your children, read them many books about many things. They will always thank you for it. Thank you Dad, I love you! You have given me so many things, and I thank you for my love of reading. I dedicate this review to my dad who will always live eternally with me as long as I have this book tucked safely away.
barbieleejay More than 1 year ago
Without a doubt a Classic in it own. My daughter loves it and she is !7yrs old. It will entertain ages 0-99..Great investment to add to a home library.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book Alice in Wonderland is a very good book. I think that it is a very good book because it is really interesting. It is a really interesting book because it's about this girl who dreams of the craziest things. In my opinion the author which is Lewis Caroll has a very creative and interesting mind. It's amazing how a person could come up with such an idea. If you were an adult that reads the book for the first time, you would think that this girl Alice is on drugs to dream of such things. If you dont think that Alice is on drugs then youll probably think that the author who wrote this book is on drugs. I know that there are a lot of books based on this title, but to me this book is the most original and best one. The book has been around for a while and still selling. The reason why is because it is such a great book. So just dont take my word for it, do some research if you dont believe me. I would defenitely recommend this book to anyone who likes fiction stories of any kind. I bet that this book would really get the attention of kids. So I also recommend this book to childeren. Childeren are not the only people i recommend it to but adults as well. Childeren and adults of all ages who love fiction are guaranteed by my experience and knowlege to really love this book as well as i do. I rate this book four out of five stars. The reason I rate this book four out of five instead of five out of five is because it could have been a little better if the authour would just have made the story a little shorter that way children wont get board. Because as we all know there are more children that will read this book than adults.
Guest More than 1 year ago
ok so as being a fifteen year old grew up loving alice in wonderland. Apparently this book is an acid trip relating to the song White rabbit by Jefferson aiplane says my mom. but the song and movie are great so when i get the chance im picking up this book immediateley.
Guest More than 1 year ago
okay, so i realize that Alice in Wonderland seems like a book for little kids and not someone that's 11 or 12 (I read it last year), but I have still wanted to read it since I learned that it was a book and not just a disney movie. But I was so wrong, it's not even funny. Alice in Wonderland is for any age of person- boy or girl- and is about a girl that has crazy adventures in wonderland. And everything, even if it seems weird- think about it- makes sense. Have you thought about it? Even if the mad hatter and the march hair are terrible and rude, they're also very funny and hares in march are said to be crazy as hatters used to be (just all the time- not just in March)everything is like that. i would reccommend this to anyone and everyone ages 0-????? i think it's healthy for people to read something like thisat least once a month.
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