Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

3.8 546
by Lewis Carroll

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Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop.'. So many readers were to take the advice of the King of Hearts that by the end of the nineteenth century Alice had acquired a pre-eminent and unassailable position in children's literature. Lewis Carroll's use of logic, by which the ordinary is translated into the extraordinary in an entirely…  See more details below


Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop.'. So many readers were to take the advice of the King of Hearts that by the end of the nineteenth century Alice had acquired a pre-eminent and unassailable position in children's literature. Lewis Carroll's use of logic, by which the ordinary is translated into the extraordinary in an entirely plausible way, is delightfully combined with an exceptional knowledge and understanding of the mind of the child. Satire, allusion, and symbolism weave deeper and mysterious meanings, lending a measure of immortality to Carroll's remarkable fantasy.

Editorial Reviews

The artwork of Salvador Dali illustrating the work of Lewis Carroll. It was, as one art watcher observed, "a match made in psychedelic Heaven. Surreal and melty, just what you'd expect from Dali." When it's available, the Spanish artist's 1969 Alice in Wonderland print run sells for thousands of dollars, but now readers can savor these rarely seen color-saturated chapter-head artworks in the context of the work that they were meant to grace. In addition to the complete Alice, this authoritative Princeton University Press edition contains detailed introductions by two experts on the unique connection between the book and surrealism's original Mad Hatter.

Product Details

Longman Publishing Group
Publication date:
English As a Second Language Bk.

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ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do. Once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it - "And what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations?"

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid) whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! oh dear! I shall be too late!" (When she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural.) But when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat pocket, and looked at it and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat pocket or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down - so suddenly, that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything. Then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and bookshelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labeled "ORANGE MARMALADE," but to her great disappointment it was empty. She did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

"Well!" thought Alice to herself, "after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling downstairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!" (Which was very likely true.) Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? "I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?" she said aloud. "I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think." (For, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over.) "Yes, that's about the right distance. But then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?" (Alice had not the slightest idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but she thought they were nice, grand words to say.)

Presently she began again. "I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think" - (she was rather glad there was no one listening this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) - "but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know - please, ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?" (and she tried to curtsy as she spoke - fancy curtsying as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) "And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere."

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. "Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!" (Dinah was the cat.) "I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. - Dinah, my dear, I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. - But do cats eat bats, I wonder?" And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, "Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?" and sometimes, "Do bats eat cats?" for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her very earnestly, "Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?" when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment. She looked up, but it was all dark overhead. Before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost. Away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, "Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!" She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

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What People are saying about this

Andy Malcolm

For A Is for Alice:

'Here is the book that Alice herself would have loved, with wonderfully whimsical illustrations by one of Canada's greatest woodcut artists, George Walker.... Combining technical mastery with insight and wit, George has re-created a much loved classic in an old world style. This book will be an essential and cherished possession for every Carrollian collector and lover of children's literature.'

From the Publisher
"Frasier masters all of Carroll's verbal gymnastics, from the Dormouse's snores to the dreamy illogic of the Caterpillar, and, of course, the nonsensical verse. This is a great pleasure."—-AudioFile
Neil Gaiman

'The delicacy and intelligence of George Walker's print-making seems to have come to us from a bygone age. Fortunately, we have George with us now.'

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Alice's Adventures In Wonderland 3.8 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 546 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The misspelled words in this version can be distracting. Also, the line breaks are awkward. Some sentences stop halfway across the page and begin again two lines down. (distracting isn't it?)It takes a lot away from an otherwise great book. Ex: Pm instead of I'm Ahce instead of Alice
DeanGibson More than 1 year ago
Scanned copy w/ no proofreading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really like this book. The author does a good job describing how the main character is feeling and thinking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I honestly love this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book. Its in very good detail, and nice characters, to. Though mind that its a very, very, strange book. But its still good. Diserves five stars
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've got absolutely no idea why, but suddenly I have been completely drawn to and facinated with this book. It's totally amazing and full of fantasy and humor! There is definately nothing like it. Lewis Carrol, you are a genius! Xoxo to all, -E
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lots of growing and shrinking Fanntasy All in all a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very witty alice would have to be my favorite storybook charecter
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ths book is wonderful. Definitly buy it. There are 181 pages and I think the sample is 55. BUY IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very interesting book but all the typos make it very hard to read. Takes a lot of personal creativity to work around.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Who cares if there are mistakes? I KNOW i dont. :)
PJMendoza More than 1 year ago
I know it's a free book, and that is probably why the format is so horrible. But after 2 or 3 chapters, the screen only showed sporadic words about the screen and you couldn't read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is great for anyone over the age of about 8
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very long, but it's a good book. Love the way the things in the book come together and stick like glue to form a book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its a good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The letters where scatterd EVERY WHERE!!!!! But besides that it was a really good book. I rate it five stars!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good. Slightly boring. Bit good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its not the full story. The full story is some what longer than 140 pgs. This is only 55. But from what is there ,it is good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great. It is a classic! It somehow just draws you into the story. There is a few spelling mistakes but it is such a great book it makes up for that. It is one of or possibly my favorite book. It is also such a steal for inly one dollar. Great book overall.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I totally LOVE these books by Disney!!!:D They r sooo awesome!!! U have to read the second one if you totally LOVE them!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you have seen the Alice in Wonderland movie, starring Jonny Depp as the Mad Hatter, circa 2010, do not expect this book to be anything like the movie. Yes, there are some similarities, but the movie is actually a blend of the 1st & 2nd Alice books- this one, and the second novel, which is called Through the Looking Glass. However, even though this novel was not what i was expecting after watchimg the movie, I still enjoyed it anf highly recommend it to anyone who is looking for a good classic novel to read. <3 the_book_worm
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You should rally read this the sample its self is amazing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I take that back this one is terrible!!!!!!!!!