Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

3.9 322
by Lewis Carroll

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Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop.'. So many readers were to take the advice of the King of Hearts that by the end of the nineteenth century Alice had acquired a pre-eminent and unassailable position in children's literature. Lewis Carroll's use of logic, by which the ordinary is translated into the extraordinary in an entirely…  See more details below


Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop.'. So many readers were to take the advice of the King of Hearts that by the end of the nineteenth century Alice had acquired a pre-eminent and unassailable position in children's literature. Lewis Carroll's use of logic, by which the ordinary is translated into the extraordinary in an entirely plausible way, is delightfully combined with an exceptional knowledge and understanding of the mind of the child. Satire, allusion, and symbolism weave deeper and mysterious meanings, lending a measure of immortality to Carroll's remarkable fantasy.

Editorial Reviews

The artwork of Salvador Dali illustrating the work of Lewis Carroll. It was, as one art watcher observed, "a match made in psychedelic Heaven. Surreal and melty, just what you'd expect from Dali." When it's available, the Spanish artist's 1969 Alice in Wonderland print run sells for thousands of dollars, but now readers can savor these rarely seen color-saturated chapter-head artworks in the context of the work that they were meant to grace. In addition to the complete Alice, this authoritative Princeton University Press edition contains detailed introductions by two experts on the unique connection between the book and surrealism's original Mad Hatter.

Product Details

EDC Publishing
Publication date:
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
8 - 14 Years

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ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do. Once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it - "And what is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations?"

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid) whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! oh dear! I shall be too late!" (When she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural.) But when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat pocket, and looked at it and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat pocket or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down - so suddenly, that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything. Then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and bookshelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labeled "ORANGE MARMALADE," but to her great disappointment it was empty. She did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

"Well!" thought Alice to herself, "after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling downstairs! How brave they'll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn't say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!" (Which was very likely true.) Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? "I wonder how many miles I've fallen by this time?" she said aloud. "I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think." (For, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over.) "Yes, that's about the right distance. But then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?" (Alice had not the slightest idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but she thought they were nice, grand words to say.)

Presently she began again. "I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it'll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think" - (she was rather glad there was no one listening this time, as it didn't sound at all the right word) - "but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know - please, ma'am, is this New Zealand or Australia?" (and she tried to curtsy as she spoke - fancy curtsying as you're falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) "And what an ignorant little girl she'll think me for asking! No, it'll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere."

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. "Dinah'll miss me very much to-night, I should think!" (Dinah was the cat.) "I hope they'll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. - Dinah, my dear, I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I'm afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that's very like a mouse, you know. - But do cats eat bats, I wonder?" And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, "Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?" and sometimes, "Do bats eat cats?" for, you see, as she couldn't answer either question, it didn't much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her very earnestly, "Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?" when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment. She looked up, but it was all dark overhead. Before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost. Away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, "Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it's getting!" She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

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What People are saying about this

Andy Malcolm

For A Is for Alice:

'Here is the book that Alice herself would have loved, with wonderfully whimsical illustrations by one of Canada's greatest woodcut artists, George Walker.... Combining technical mastery with insight and wit, George has re-created a much loved classic in an old world style. This book will be an essential and cherished possession for every Carrollian collector and lover of children's literature.'

From the Publisher
"Frasier masters all of Carroll's verbal gymnastics, from the Dormouse's snores to the dreamy illogic of the Caterpillar, and, of course, the nonsensical verse. This is a great pleasure."—-AudioFile
Neil Gaiman

'The delicacy and intelligence of George Walker's print-making seems to have come to us from a bygone age. Fortunately, we have George with us now.'

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 322 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was fun and easy to read. It's a nice break from the real world and very imaginative. I read it because my geometry book was based on some of the puns.
PhilMarlowe More than 1 year ago
The formatting makes it impossible to read.
civilwargirl More than 1 year ago
Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the classic story of a young girl adventures in an imaginative world were nothing is at it should be. Adventures in Wonderland changed children's literature forever, before this book came out story's for children had to be instructive with a moral lesson. Now children's books could just be fun, we all owe a debt to Lewis Carroll who changed what we read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderfully hilarious book about the adventures of a little girl, Alice, and her exploits in the outrageous world of Wonderland. Alice is a simple 7-and-a-half-year-old that falls down a rabbit hole, and into a land of wonder, filled to the brim with hilarious and quirky characters. As she meanders around wonderland, she meets many a strange character. A condescending caterpillar and a magnificent mad hatter are just some of the people Alice has the pleasure of making the acquaintance. This is a book about the fun a merriment a child’s imagination holds. This is my all time favorite book. There are numerous clever little jokes that only a very learned person may catch. If you are looking for a side-splitting read full of child-like innocence, this is the book for you. This isn’t a book about action, it’s about fun. Trust me, this book will make you relive the days when you were a child, and your imagination was as big as the sky. Note: this book is quite old and contains a lot of archaic terms; it can get a little confusing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Alice in Wonderland is an imaginative satire on the British education system of the nineteenth century. The unreasonable environment in which the story takes place exemplifies all the shortcomings of the British education system as seen by Lewis Carroll, evident in the often inverted situations Alice constantly encounters throughout the course of the story. It is clearly evident in this story that Lewis Carroll questioned the worth of British education. Pandemonium seems to omnipresent throughout the entire story. The fantastic qualities of the setting in conjunction with Alice¿s character traits allow for the most unreasonable events to occur. Thus, the conditions favor events that are more bizarre. Had the principles of a more solid education been engrained in Alice, the story would probably have ended abruptly as soon as she realized the ridiculousness of it all. However, because she was not adequately educated, the British education reflected in her actions and speech. Oftentimes, she refers to knowledge of subjects that she learns in school, but it would all come out wrong. Her knowledge of science is obviously incorrect and the verses she recites have substituted words that completely distort the verse. Yet through her warped reasoning and the aid of the chaotic environment, she is somehow able to make sense of it all! Clearly, these anomalies suggest that the British education system was far from useful and adequate during the nineteenth century. Although presented in the imaginative manner of a children¿s book, the message embedded within Alice in Wonderland is still clear. Only with British education of the nineteenth century can people go through an experience like that of Alice, unable to realize the ridiculousness surrounding them.
Destiny_Murillo More than 1 year ago
Well, Alice Adventure's in Wonderland is an amazing book to read. The plot of the story is amazing. It has a climax and rising action. The problem of the story is that Alice ends up in the world of Wonderland where fantasy and imagination control the land. The problem of the story is that Alice can't find her way to the real world. She comes into many problems with different people or animals. Example: Like when the caterpillar gave her a mushroom to eat. I enjoyed the novel because of talking animals and how Lewis Carroll used his imagination with the story. I loved how all the characters are different with different personalities. None of the characters are the same. The characters in this novel are animals that talk. Alice is an English child who is very wise, confident , and intelligent. the Queen of Hearts is an evil person in this novel, she is the villan. The King of Hearts is even scared of her. Hatter is one of the people who is at the tea party with Alice. March Hare was also with Alice through the story. The Dormouse was a mouse who was always around with everyone. The Duchess were part of the Tea party as well. And Cheshire Cat is also an evil animal. He likes to disappear and reappear. He is an animal who always loves to grin. Well hope that you guys enjoy reading this novel. (:
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book I liked the Cat. :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bad book random lines from random pages too many mistakes I tell you its BAD
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My brothers and sisters don't like Alice in Wonderland but I've wached the movie and Iove it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No story, just pics and odd lines from random pages
Lily Johnson More than 1 year ago
Its hard to understand!
Anonymous 2 days ago
I dont know what else to say besides that i freaking love it
Anonymous 4 months ago
Anonymous 4 months ago
Go jump out of a window, Dante.
Anonymous 4 months ago
Walks in wearing a royal blue dress and her hair curled...she looks out into the crowd.
Anonymous 4 months ago
I walk in and tern to the shadowy wall in the back. My face paler than it was. I sit down and in the shadow my eyes are glowing a pink and they are close to a red." Rowan....." i say and i start to growl." Help...." i growl again.
Anonymous 4 months ago
I walk in, looking around.
Anonymous 4 months ago
She wore a black suit and a wolf mask. She kept a hand on a small knife just in case
Anonymous 4 months ago
Walks in wearing long black dress her hair curled still covering half of her face she is wearing heeled boots light black makeup
Anonymous 5 months ago
Cool i love it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was such a bad way to tell the story of Alice in Wonderland.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is better than the movie because in my opinion (to me) its like you areewilkli having an adventure in you head. I love reading beacause reading is basicaly aabout you having fun in you imaginary mind. And it also brings you back in history if you read histery. That why i love reading. Exspecialy this book the is about alice in a wonder land were she helped the good princess. Well i don'know that much because i'm on page10 that for reading my rate and hope you read my other novel dork diary the first book.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My name is Blade and i need a clan very bad i have all black fer and my front right paw and back left paw are white i have dark grey eyes plz help.