Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Sterling Unabridged Classics Series) [NOOK Book]

Overview


One of the most magical concoctions in children's literature, Lewis Carroll's tale follows Alice into the upside-down, inside-out world of Wonderland where she attends the tea party of the Mad Hatter and plays croquet in the court of the Queen of Hearts
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Sterling Unabridged Classics Series)

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Overview


One of the most magical concoctions in children's literature, Lewis Carroll's tale follows Alice into the upside-down, inside-out world of Wonderland where she attends the tea party of the Mad Hatter and plays croquet in the court of the Queen of Hearts
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402772436
  • Publisher: Sterling
  • Publication date: 9/18/2009
  • Series: Sterling Unabridged Classics
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 136
  • Sales rank: 465,957
  • Age range: 10 years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Lewis Carroll
Dr. Arthur Pober, Ed.D., holds a doctorate and two Masters Degrees in the fields of educational psychology, counseling, and organizational development. He has served as the principal of Hunter College Elementary School, the oldest laboratory school for gifted children; and as the head of CARU, the Children's Advertising Review Unit, a self-regulatory organization for children's advertising.

Scott McKowen is an illustrator and graphic designer specializing in posters and graphics for the performing arts. He has designed book cover illustrations, and most recently, completed a series of covers for Marvel Comics. His clients include the Roundabout Theatre on Broadway; Yale Repertory Theatre and the Yale School of Drama; The Acting Company in New York, Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., and Chicago's Goodman Theatre. McKowen was commissioned by the Royal Canadian Mint to design Canada's 2001 silver dollar.

Biography

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was a man of diverse interests -- in mathematics, logic, photgraphy, art, theater, religion, medicine, and science. He was happiest in the company of children for whom he created puzzles, clever games, and charming letters.

As all Carroll admirers know, his book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), became an immediate success and has since been translated into more than eighty languages. The equally popular sequel Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, was published in 1872.

The Alice books are but one example of his wide ranging authorship. The Hunting of the Snark, a classic nonsense epic (1876) and Euclid and His Modern Rivals, a rare example of humorous work concerning mathematics, still entice and intrigue today's students. Sylvie and Bruno, published toward the end of his life contains startling ideas including an 1889 description of weightlessness.

The humor, sparkling wit and genius of this Victorian Englishman have lasted for more than a century. His books are among the most quoted works in the English language, and his influence (with that of his illustrator, Sir John Tenniel) can be seen everywhere, from the world of advertising to that of atomic physics.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Group (USA).

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    1. Also Known As:
      Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (real name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 27, 1832
    2. Place of Birth:
      Daresbury, Cheshire, England
    1. Date of Death:
      January 14, 1898
    2. Place of Death:
      Guildford, Surrey, England

Read an Excerpt



I
 
Down the Rabbit Hole
 
 
Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, “and what is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations?”
So he was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.
There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (When she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but, when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.
In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.
The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before shefound herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.
Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything: then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed: it was labeled “ORANGE MARMALADE,” but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar, for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.
“Well!” thought Alice to herself. “After such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down-stairs! How brave they’ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it, even I fell off the top of the house!” (Which was very likely true)
Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? “I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time?” she said aloud. “I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think—”(for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the school-room, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) “—yes, that’s about the right distance—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to?” (Alice had not the slightest idea what Latitude was or Longitude either, but she thought they were nice grand words to say.)
Presently she began again. “I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it’ll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downwards! The antipathies, I think—” (she was rather glad there was no one listening, this time, as it didn’t sound at all the right word) “—but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please Ma’m, is this New Zealand? Or Australia?” (and she tried to curtsey as she spoke—fancy, curtseying as you’re falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) “And what an ignorant little girl she’ll think me for asking! No, it’ll never do to ask: Perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.”
Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. “Dinah’ll miss me very much to-night, I should think!” (Dinah was the cat.) “I hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah, my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I’m afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that’s very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?” And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, “Do bats eat cats?” for, you see, as she couldn’t answer either question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her, very earnestly, “Now, Dinah , tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?” when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and fall was over.
Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, “Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it’s getting!” She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.
There were doors all around the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.
Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it but a tiny golden key, and Alice’s first idea was that this might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted!
Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than the rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through the doorway; “and even if my head would go through,” thought poor Alice, “it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin.” For, you see, so many out-of-the-way thinks had happened lately that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.
There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it (“which certainly was not here before,” said Alice), and tied around the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words “DRINK ME” beautifully printed on it in large letters
It was all very well to say “Drink me,” but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. “No, I’ll look first,” she said, “and see whether it’s marked ‘poison’ or not” for she had read several nice little stories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts, and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that, if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked “poison,” it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.
However, this bottle was not marked “poison,” so Alice ventures to taste it, and finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pineapple, roast turkey, toffy, and hot buttered toast), she very soon finished it off.
* * *
“What a curious feeling!” said Alice. “I must be shutting up like a telescope!”
And so it was indeed: she was now only ten inches high, and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now the right size for going through the little door into that lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to shrink any further: she felt a little nervous about this; “for it might end, you know,” said Alice to herself, “in my going out altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like then?” And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle looks like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing.
After a while, finding that nothing more happened, she decided on going into the garden at once; but, alas for poor Alice! when she got to the door, she found she had forgotten the little golden key, and when she went back to the table for it, she found she could not possibly reach it: She could see it quite plainly through the glass, and she tried her best to climb up one of the legs of the table, but it was too slippery; and when she had tired herself out with trying, the poor little thing sat down and cried.
“Come, there’s no use in crying like that!” said Alice to herself, rather sharply. “I advise you to leave off this minute!” She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into eyes; and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself in a game of croquet she was playing against herself, for this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people. “But it’s no use now,” thought poor Alice, “to pretend to be two people! Why, there’s hardly enough of me left to make one respectable person!”
Soon her eye fell on a little glass box that was lying under the table; she opened it, and found in it a very small cake, on which the words “EAT ME” said beautifully marked in currants. “Well, I’ll eat it,” said Alice, “and if it makes me grow larger, I can reach the key; and if it makes me grow smaller, I can creep under the door; so either way I’ll get into the garden, and I don’t care which happens!”
She ate a little bit, and said anxiously to herself “Which way? Which way?” holding her hand on the top of her head to feel which way it was growing; and she was quite surprised to find that she remained the same size: to be sure, this is what generally happens when one eats cake; but Alice had got so much into the way of expecting nothing but out-of-the-way things to happen, that it seemed quite dull and stupid for life to go in the common way.
So she set to work, and very soon finished off the cake.
* * *
All new material copyright © 1988 by Jane Yolen
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 284 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(131)

4 Star

(57)

3 Star

(47)

2 Star

(14)

1 Star

(35)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 382 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2006

    Of Facts and Chaos

    Alice in Wonderland is an imaginative satire on the British education system of the nineteenth century. The unreasonable environment in which the story takes place exemplifies all the shortcomings of the British education system as seen by Lewis Carroll, evident in the often inverted situations Alice constantly encounters throughout the course of the story. It is clearly evident in this story that Lewis Carroll questioned the worth of British education. Pandemonium seems to omnipresent throughout the entire story. The fantastic qualities of the setting in conjunction with Alice¿s character traits allow for the most unreasonable events to occur. Thus, the conditions favor events that are more bizarre. Had the principles of a more solid education been engrained in Alice, the story would probably have ended abruptly as soon as she realized the ridiculousness of it all. However, because she was not adequately educated, the British education reflected in her actions and speech. Oftentimes, she refers to knowledge of subjects that she learns in school, but it would all come out wrong. Her knowledge of science is obviously incorrect and the verses she recites have substituted words that completely distort the verse. Yet through her warped reasoning and the aid of the chaotic environment, she is somehow able to make sense of it all! Clearly, these anomalies suggest that the British education system was far from useful and adequate during the nineteenth century. Although presented in the imaginative manner of a children¿s book, the message embedded within Alice in Wonderland is still clear. Only with British education of the nineteenth century can people go through an experience like that of Alice, unable to realize the ridiculousness surrounding them.

    17 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 23, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Classic!

    Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the classic story of a young girl adventures in an imaginative world were nothing is at it should be. Adventures in Wonderland changed children's literature forever, before this book came out story's for children had to be instructive with a moral lesson. Now children's books could just be fun, we all owe a debt to Lewis Carroll who changed what we read.

    11 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2004

    Fun to read!

    This book was fun and easy to read. It's a nice break from the real world and very imaginative. I read it because my geometry book was based on some of the puns.

    11 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 22, 2011

    Illegible

    The formatting makes it impossible to read.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2013

    Horrible

    Why cant you give no stars it was absoluly horrible this is what it looks like
    $%<[
    €¿+&?
    @>*/,
    <'&/+
    >]%:-
    :/(>
    %'-&
    %'-*;<

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2013

    Anonymous

    Bad book random lines from random pages too many mistakes I tell you its BAD

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2012

    A Hilarious Adventure, seriously, read it now

    A wonderfully hilarious book about the adventures of a little girl, Alice, and her exploits in the outrageous world of Wonderland. Alice is a simple 7-and-a-half-year-old that falls down a rabbit hole, and into a land of wonder, filled to the brim with hilarious and quirky characters. As she meanders around wonderland, she meets many a strange character. A condescending caterpillar and a magnificent mad hatter are just some of the people Alice has the pleasure of making the acquaintance. This is a book about the fun a merriment a child’s imagination holds. This is my all time favorite book. There are numerous clever little jokes that only a very learned person may catch. If you are looking for a side-splitting read full of child-like innocence, this is the book for you. This isn’t a book about action, it’s about fun. Trust me, this book will make you relive the days when you were a child, and your imagination was as big as the sky. Note: this book is quite old and contains a lot of archaic terms; it can get a little confusing.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2013

    No story

    No story, just pics and odd lines from random pages

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2012

    Rating

    I dont know if it is a good book so somebody please tell me!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2013

    Chesire Cat

    Later kids

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 13, 2012

    This Is An Amazing Book!

    Well, Alice Adventure's in Wonderland is an amazing book to read. The plot of the story is amazing. It has a climax and rising action. The problem of the story is that Alice ends up in the world of Wonderland where fantasy and imagination control the land. The problem of the story is that Alice can't find her way to the real world. She comes into many problems with different people or animals. Example: Like when the caterpillar gave her a mushroom to eat.

    I enjoyed the novel because of talking animals and how Lewis Carroll used his imagination with the story. I loved how all the characters are different with different personalities. None of the characters are the same. The characters in this novel are animals that talk. Alice is an English child who is very wise, confident , and intelligent. the Queen of Hearts is an evil person in this novel, she is the villan. The King of Hearts is even scared of her. Hatter is one of the people who is at the tea party with Alice. March Hare was also with Alice through the story. The Dormouse was a mouse who was always around with everyone. The Duchess were part of the Tea party as well. And Cheshire Cat is also an evil animal. He likes to disappear and reappear. He is an animal who always loves to grin. Well hope that you guys enjoy reading this novel. (:

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2012

    # of mistakes

    I counted over 311 mistakes

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2011

    Not a good book

    Its hard to understand!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 19, 2009

    alice in wonderland

    wonderful book i've read it twice

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2013

    This book good for teens not just young kids i love all alice in wonderland

    ( ) ( )
    (o .o)
    Bunny!
    ^ ^
    ( o.o)
    Kitty!

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2013

    Great!

    Good book I liked the Cat. :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2013

    n his colorful new illustrations for a much-illustrated classic,

    n his colorful new illustrations for a much-illustrated classic, Browne strikes exactly the right note: he pays homage to the inescapable Tenniel in the moments he depicts and even in the way he depicts them, but in his own highly individual style; he includes a satisfying number of full-page and smaller illustrations, but not so many that they overwhelm the text. His paintings are cool and clean, each detail rendered with sharp precision. Browne's fans will not be surprised to find satire as well as a comic spirit: the cook's apron is tied with a string of sausages; the Duchess's headdress and nostrils give a remarkably piggish cast to her tweezed, matronly face; the Mouse has a toad for a tie, a fish in his pocket, and a tail that follows the pattern of his subsequent tale; the shelved rabbit-hole is full of curious, surrealist treasures; and such Browne familiars as a chimp and a gorilla make quiet appearances in crowd scenes. You may not have known you needed another Alice, but you need this one.



    Kyle A

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2013

    Love it!

    My brothers and sisters don't like Alice in Wonderland but I've wached the movie and Iove it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2011

    So, good I love it Ilove love it it!

    Who ever look's at this buy it.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 1, 2011

    Bad

    never read this book!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 382 Customer Reviews

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