Alien Nation: Nineteenth-Century Gothic Fictions and English Nationality

Alien Nation: Nineteenth-Century Gothic Fictions and English Nationality

by Cannon Schmitt
     
 

Rife with sexuality, chaos, confusion, and terror, the Gothic has seemed to many of its recent readers to be a subversive genre, resisting enforced gender constructions or straitened notions of rationality, disinterring that which has been forbidden or repressed. In Alien Nation Cannon Schmitt moves away from these models of the genre to chart, instead, the

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Overview

Rife with sexuality, chaos, confusion, and terror, the Gothic has seemed to many of its recent readers to be a subversive genre, resisting enforced gender constructions or straitened notions of rationality, disinterring that which has been forbidden or repressed. In Alien Nation Cannon Schmitt moves away from these models of the genre to chart, instead, the ways in which Gothic fictions and conventions gave shape to a sense of English nationality during the century in which British imperial power was stretching out its greatest reach.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Challenging the accepted view of Gothic literature as subversive, shows how the conventions of the genre gave shape to a sense of English nationality during the century when British imperial power was attaining its greatest reach. Examines the work of Ann Radcliffe, De Quincey, Charlotte Bront<:e>, Matthew Arnold, Wilkie Collins, and Bram Stoker. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780812233513
Publisher:
University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/1997
Series:
New Cultural Studies Series
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
5.77(w) x 8.84(h) x 1.00(d)

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