All about Soups and Stews (Joy of Cooking All about... Series)

Overview

A fresh and original way to put the classic advice of Joy of Cooking to work -- illustrated and designed in a beautiful and easy-to-use new book.

Chapters covering vegetable soups and stews, legume soups and stews, chowders, meat and poultry soups and stews, fruit soups, and more More than 130 of Joy's most popular recipes -- from Fresh Tomato Soup to Mulligatawny Soup to Brunswick Stew -- plus recipes for 14 different stocks Easy-to-follow ...

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Overview

A fresh and original way to put the classic advice of Joy of Cooking to work -- illustrated and designed in a beautiful and easy-to-use new book.

Chapters covering vegetable soups and stews, legume soups and stews, chowders, meat and poultry soups and stews, fruit soups, and more More than 130 of Joy's most popular recipes -- from Fresh Tomato Soup to Mulligatawny Soup to Brunswick Stew -- plus recipes for 14 different stocks Easy-to-follow tips and techniques for effective storage, serving, and ingredient substitutions.

Sixty years after Irma Rombauer advised new cooks to "Stand facing the stove," America's love affair with Joy of Cooking continues unabated. And why not? Joy in hand, tens of millions of people -- from novices to professionals -- have learned to do everything from make a meat loaf to clean a squid to frost a wedding cake.

For decades, Joy of Cooking has taught America how to cook, serving as the standard against which all other cookbooks are judged. Soups & Stews upholds that standard. While keeping the conversational and instructional manner of the flagship book, Soups & Stews is organized into ten chapters that cover stocks and broths, chowders, fish and seafood soups and stews, fruit soups, and more. This book incorporates more than 130 of Joy's best-loved recipes -- Chicken Stock to Irish Stew to Melon Soup. You'll also find recipes for a dozen or more condiments and quick breads, as well as techniques for straining and storing stock. Add to that more than 150 original photographs, specially commissioned for this volume, presented in the most easy-to-use design imaginable.

Whether you belong to one of the millions of American households that already own a copy (or two) of Joy, or you have never cracked the spine of a cookbook before, Joy of Cooking: Soups & Stews is for you. It is a spectacular achievement, worthy of its name. Joy has never been more beautiful.

The Indispensable Kitchen Resource...
All-New, All-Purpose, and now All-in-Color

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The first four titles in a new series, these are spin-offs from The All New All Purpose Joy of Cooking (LJ 10/15/97), the major revision of the old favorite. Unlike the "new Joy" or any previous edition, these are filled with photographs, 100 full-color and 50 black-and-white each. Most of the text and the recipes come directly from the 1997 book, although some of the material has been reorganized, and some new material is included that didn't make it into that edition. (On the other hand, not all the recipes from the chicken chapter, for example, made it into All About Chicken.) The books have a very appealing look, and readers will find the photographs of ingredients, finished dishes, and techniques helpful, but since the 1,136-page Joy is still available for $35, most home cooks may not want to buy these, too. By the same token, they seem great for "borrowing," and libraries are sure to face demand. Strongly recommended. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781435104617
  • Publisher: Sterling
  • Publication date: 12/29/2007
  • Series: Joy of Cooking All about... Series
  • Pages: 128
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Irma Rombauer self-published the first Joy of Cooking in 1931 with the small insurance payout she received after her husband committed suicide during the Great Depression. Suddenly, society wives who used to enjoy a kitchen staff no longer had the money to employ them and began cooking for themselves. The instruction "stand facing the stove" was a bit more pragmatic than we realize. In 1936, the first commercial edition was published by Bobbs-Merrill. Marion Rombauer Becker, Irma's daughter, joined the Joy dynasty and revised and updated each subsequent edition until 1975. That edition was the first after Irma's death and was completely Marion's. Her son, Ethan Becker, has returned the book to the family's voice, revising the 1975 edition for the 75th Anniversary Edition.

Ethan Becker is the son of Marion Rombauer Becker and the grandson of Irma S. Rombauer, the original author of The Joy of Cooking. He attended Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, but learned how to cook from his mom. An outdoors-man, he is a master of the grill and at cooking game. His outdoor gear and survival and combat knives are sold internationally under the brand Becker Knife and Tool. Ethan and his wife, Susan, a writer, editor, and artist, live in East Tennessee at their home, Half Moon Ridge. His website is TheJoyKitchen.com.

Irma Rombauer self-published the first Joy of Cooking in 1931 with the small insurance payout she received after her husband committed suicide during the Great Depression. Suddenly, society wives who used to enjoy a kitchen staff no longer had the money to employ them and began cooking for themselves. The instruction "stand facing the stove" was a bit more pragmatic than we realize. In 1936, the first commercial edition was published by Bobbs-Merrill. Marion Rombauer Becker, Irma's daughter, joined the Joy dynasty and revised and updated each subsequent edition until 1975. That edition was the first after Irma's death and was completely Marion's. Her son, Ethan Becker, has returned the book to the family's voice, revising the 1975 edition for the 75th Anniversary Edition.

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Read an Excerpt

New England Clam Chowder

About 4 cups

This New England clam chowder gets its creamy thickness from heavy cream and the starch in the potatoes.

Scrub individually with a vegetable brush:

5 pounds quahogs or other hard shell clams

Place in a sink or large soup pot, cover with cold water, and stir in:

1/4 cup salt

Let stand for 30 minutes to rid the clams of sand. Rinse and drain in a colander. Place the clams in a large soup pot and add:

1 cup water
Any scraps of onion, celery, thyme, or bay leaf (optional)

Cover and steam over high heat until the clams are completely open, 10 to 15 minutes. Discard any that do not open. Pour the cooking liquid through a fine-mesh sieve and set aside. When the clams are cool enough to handle, remove from their shells and coarsely chop into 3/8-inch pieces.

Place in a soup pot and cook, stirring, over medium heat until slightly crisp:

2 slices bacon or 2 ounces salt pork, diced

Stir in:

1 medium onion, cut into 1/2-inch dice
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
1 tablespoon unsalted butter

When the onions are translucent, add the reserved cooking liquid along with:

3 red or white new potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch dice

Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 12 minutes. Stir in the chopped clams along with:

1 cup heavy cream

Simmer for 5 minutes. Season with:

Ground black pepper to taste
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

Ladle into soup dishes or cups.
Serve with:

Cream Biscuits, 123, or common crackers


Thai Chicken and Coconut Soup

About 6 cups

Coconut milk is an infusion of grated coconut and boiling water or milk and is easily mode from scratch. Pour 1 cup boiling water or milk over 1 packed cup fresh coconut shreds. Stir well, cover, and let steep for 30 minutes. Process the mixture (no more than 3 cups at a time) in a blender or food processor for 1 minute. Pour all the shreds and milk into a damp clean cloth and press the liquid into a bowl, squeezing until the shreds are dry. The first pressing is referred to as thick coconut milk, and the yield is about 1 cup. Cover, refrigerate, and use within 3 days. Simmer kaffir lime leaves or lemon grass in the coconut milk first for a delicate citrus flavor.
Bring to a boil in a soup pot:

3 cups Chicken Stock, 22
2 2/3 cups unsweetened coconut milk

Reduce the heat and stir in:

2 small Thai peppers or 3 fresh jalapeño peppers, seeded and sliced
3 tablespoons Thai fish sauce (nam pla) or soy sauce
1 teaspoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1/8 teaspoon salt

Simmer for 10 minutes, then stir in:

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the chicken is no longer pink, about 5 minutes. Ladle into warmed bowls. Garnish with:

Chopped fresh cilantro

Copyright © 2000 by Simon & Schuster Inc.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Foreword

About Soups & Stews

About Stocks & Broths

About Clear Stocks With Additions

About Vegetable Soups & Stews

About Legume Soups & Stews

About Chowders

About Fish And Seafood Soups & Stews

About Meat And Poultry Soups & Stews

About Fruit Soups

About Condiments & Quick Breads

Index

Acknowledgments

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First Chapter

12 to 14 cups; 8 to 10 servings

Use salmon, monkfish, blackfish, cod, or wolffish in this fish chowder. Flaky fish, such as flounder, mackerel, or sea bass, tend to fall apart too easily. Serve as a main course for lunch or dinner. For a reduced-fat fish chowder, omit the cream. Cream biscuits are perfect for soaking up the soup.

Remove any excess skin and, using tweezers, pick out any bones from:

3½ pounds boneless, skinless fish fillets

If you have to use a knife to cut out the bones, be sure to leave the fillets in pieces as large as possible. Place in a large soup pot and cook, stirring, over low heat until it is beginning to crisp, 10 to 15 minutes:

4 ounces meaty salt pork or 4 slices bacon, cut into ¼- to ½H-inch dice

Add and cook, stirring, until the onions are tender but not browned, 10 to 15 minutes:

4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter

2 large onions, cut into 1-inch dice

3 bay leaves

1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme

Stir in:

3 large Maine or other boiling potatoes, peeled, halved lengthwise, and cut into ¼G-inch-thick slices

3 cups Fish Stock, 21, Fish Fumet, 21, or Express Fish Broth, 28

Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and stir in the fish fillets along with:

2 cups heavy cream

Simmer until the fish is cooked through and beginning to flake, 8 to 10 minutes. Season with:

Salt and ground black pepper to taste

2 tablespoons choppedfresh parsley and/or chervil

Remove from the heat. Ladle into soup dishes. Top each serving with:

Dollop of butter

Serve with:

Cream Biscuits, 123, or common crackers

Copyright © 2000 by Simon & Schuster Inc., The Joy of Cooking Trust and The MRB Revocable Trust

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Recipe

Landlubber's Fish Chowder

12 to 14 cups; 8 to 10 servings

Use salmon, monkfish, blackfish, cod, or wolffish in this fish chowder. Flaky fish, such as flounder, mackerel, or sea bass, tend to fall apart too easily. Serve as a main course for lunch or dinner. For a reduced-fat fish chowder, omit the cream. Cream biscuits are perfect for soaking up the soup.

Remove any excess skin and, using tweezers, pick out any bones from:

3½ pounds boneless, skinless fish fillets

If you have to use a knife to cut out the bones, be sure to leave the fillets in pieces as large as possible. Place in a large soup pot and cook, stirring, over low heat until it is beginning to crisp, 10 to 15 minutes:

4 ounces meaty salt pork or 4 slices bacon, cut into ¼- to ½H-inch dice

Add and cook, stirring, until the onions are tender but not browned, 10 to 15 minutes:

4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter

2 large onions, cut into 1-inch dice

3 bay leaves

1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme

Stir in:

3 large Maine or other boiling potatoes, peeled, halved lengthwise, and cut into ¼G-inch-thick slices

3 cups Fish Stock, 21, Fish Fumet, 21, or Express Fish Broth, 28

Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and stir in the fish fillets along with:

2 cups heavy cream

Simmer until the fish is cooked through and beginning to flake, 8 to 10 minutes. Season with:

Salt and ground black pepper to taste

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley and/or chervil

Remove from the heat. Ladle into soup dishes. Top each serving with:

Dollop of butter

Serve with:

Cream Biscuits, 123, or common crackers

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