All-American Girl

( 799 )

Overview

Top Ten Reasons Samantha Madison is in Deep Trouble

10. Her big sister is the most popular girl in school

9. Her little sister is a certified genius

8. She's in love with her big sister's boyfriend

7. ...

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All-American Girl

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Overview

Top Ten Reasons Samantha Madison is in Deep Trouble

10. Her big sister is the most popular girl in school

9. Her little sister is a certified genius

8. She's in love with her big sister's boyfriend

7. She got caught selling celebrity portraits in school

6. And now she's being forced to take art classes

5. She's just saved the president of the United Statesfrom an assassination attempt

4. So the whole world thinks she is a hero

3. Even though Sam knows she is far, far from being a hero

2. And now she's been appointed teen ambassador to the UNAnd the number-one reason Sam's life is over?1. The president's son just might be in love with her

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Meg Cabot, bestselling author of The Princess Diaries, shoots off literary fireworks in this capital romance about an artistic alterna-girl, whose world is rocked when she saves the life of the U.S. president and gets chummy with his son.

Samantha Madison is an average, cool Washington, D.C., teen: She loves Gwen Stefani (who doesn't?), can draw like nobody's business, and enjoys being opposite to her sister's annoying ultra-social personality. When she ditches art class one day, however, she doesn't expect to be jumping on the back of a wannabe presidential assassin. Soon, the young hero is receiving worldwide acclaim for her bravery, having dinner with her family at the White House, and is even being named teen ambassador to the UN. As if this weren't enough, she and David, the president's son, strike up a friendship that everyone wants the dirt on, which starts to give her romantic "frisson" feelings. Unfortunately, Sam thinks her sister's boyfriend, Jack, is the true love of her life, and she makes a few wrong turns that could screw up what she's developing with David. Will she ever stop following what she knows and start following what she sees?

With a lively story line that will leave you dreaming about dates with American "royalty," All-American Girl is a fast-paced heartwarmer that will quickly zoom to No. 1 on fans' top ten lists. Sam's realistic language and emotions make her a well-developed and likable character, and the relationship between her and David -- although totally coincidental -- has enough unexpected surprises to keep readers glued. A teenage romance with Secret Service agents and presidential motorcades, this modern-day fairy tale is star-spangled fun. Shana Taylor

Publishers Weekly
In another teen-pleasing novel from the author of the Princess Diaries books, a feisty 15-year-old self-described "urban rebel" finds that her life suddenly changes when she foils an attempt to assassinate the president. "A convincing and diverting tale," PW said in a starred review. Ages 12-up. (Aug.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Meg Cabot, well known for her Princess Diaries books, has also done well with this book. Samantha Madison has lived in Washington, D.C. her entire life, but she never really had any encounters with the presidential family. When Sam is forced to take drawing classes she finds herself accidentally saving the president from an assassination attempt. Suddenly, Sam, the middle child, finds herself at the center of everyone's attention. In addition to her new friendship with the president, Sam becomes close with his son. She begins to question her crush on a boy that she had always considered perfect. The story, while quite an adventure, seems just plausible enough that it could happen to your average teen standing on the corner. Cabot does a nice job capturing issues of a high schooler and their solutions. 2003, HarperTrophy/HarperCollins,
— Caroline Haugen
KLIATT
To quote from the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, September 2002: Sam doesn't think of herself as anything special. Sure, she has artistic talent, but compared with her beautiful, popular older sister and her brilliant younger sister, she self-pityingly describes herself as "a fifteen-year-old, left-handed, redheaded, boyfriendless, misunderstood, middle child reject, broke, standing in the rain after her drawing class because she couldn't take criticism." Then the president's motorcade draws up, and as the president emerges Sam notices that the man next to her on the curb is pulling out a gun. Acting instinctively, Sam throws herself on the would-be assassin, saving the president's life, breaking her wrist, and catapulting herself into instant celebrity; though she's more concerned with being grounded by her parents for skipping class. Sam meets the president and his family, and is appointed teen ambassador to the U.N.; and who knew the cute guy in her drawing class would turn out to be the president's son, David? This funny, breezy novel, very much in the style of Cabot's wildly popular Princess Diaries series, chronicles the ups and downs of this developing romance, as Sam recovers from her crush on her sister's knee-jerk radical boyfriend and comes to appreciate David. She also learns to use her new celebrity to take a stand on an issue of political and artistic integrity. As in the Princess Diaries books, there are up-to-date references to brand names that teens will recognize and humorous David Letterman-type lists that enliven Sam's first-person narrative. My 14-year-old daughter read this eagerly, though she commented that she preferred the Princess Diaries books and their castof characters. But fans of those will certainly want to read this entertaining romp. KLIATT Codes: JS; Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2002, HarperTrophy, 398p.,
— Paula Rohrlick
KLIATT - Paula Rohrlick
To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, September 2002: Sam doesn't think of herself as anything special. Sure, she has artistic talent, but compared with her beautiful, popular older sister and her brilliant younger sister, she self-pityingly describes herself as "a fifteen-year-old, left-handed, redheaded, boyfriendless, misunderstood, middle child reject, broke, standing in the rain after her drawing class because she couldn't take criticism." Then the president's motorcade draws up, and as the president emerges Sam notices that the man next to her on the curb is pulling out a gun. Acting instinctively, Sam throws herself on the would-be assassin, saving the president's life, breaking her wrist, and catapulting herself into instant celebrity—though she's more concerned with being grounded by her parents for skipping class. Sam meets the president and his family, and is appointed teen ambassador to the U.N.—and who knew the cute guy in her drawing class would turn out to be the president's son, David? This funny, breezy novel, very much in the style of Cabot's wildly popular Princess Diaries series, chronicles the ups and downs of this developing romance, as Sam recovers from her crush on her sister's knee-jerk radical boyfriend and comes to appreciate David. She also learns to use her new celebrity to take a stand on an issue of political and artistic integrity. As in the Princess Diaries books, there are up-to-date references to brand names that teens will recognize and humorous David Letterman-type lists that enliven Sam's first-person narrative. My 14-year-old daughter read this eagerly, though she commented that she preferred the Princess Diaries books andtheir cast of characters. But fans of those will certainly want to read this entertaining romp. Reviewer: Paula Rohrlick
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-Samantha Madison is back. She is still a semi-celebrity for saving the president's life and she is still dating his son. She is faced with a huge dilemma when it appears that she not only condemns the president's new Return to Family policy, but also implies that she has slept with David. The ensuing consequences and Samantha's conflicted feelings about sex provide drama. A subplot involves Lucy, Samantha's older sister, falling for her nerdy math tutor, who does not return her feelings. This is a surprisingly political book with a positive attitude about sex. The themes are more mature than those of "The Princess Diaries" series. Samantha writes frequent top-10 lists, such as "Top ten things that suck about being the sister of the most popular girl in school." Teen sexuality and honesty about protection, awkwardness, and masturbation are handled in a humorous and sensitive manner. The characters are real, witty, and relatable, and the author has an ear for teen dialogue. Some more conservative areas and school libraries might give pause, but the book is funny, smart, well paced, and honest.-Amy Patrick, New York Public Library Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In this sequel to All-American Girl (2002), Samantha Madison, now almost 17, must cope with hero status in society (she saved the President's life) but unpopularity at school, the disconcerting but nonetheless intriguing discovery that models don't wear a stitch of clothing in life-drawing class and the possibility of sex with her boyfriend David, who just happens to be the President's son. The central comic misunderstanding that drives this attenuated, sitcom-like story is an invitation from David to join his family at Camp David over Thanksgiving weekend. David tells Samantha that there are lots of fun things to do there, including Parcheesi, which Samantha concludes is a code word for sex. This drives Cabot's funny, outspoken heroine into a tizzy as she tries to figure out if she's ready or not, a situation that thoroughly confuses her boyfriend and later culminates in a mortifying public debate with the President. Cabot is a witty writer who has the ability to practically channel teen-speak, and while this work is thinner than her usual fare, fans should come away satisfied. (Fiction. 12-14)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061479892
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/25/2008
  • Series: All-American Girl Series
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 110,766
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 0.83 (d)

Meet the Author

Meg Cabot was born in Bloomington, Indiana. In addition to her adult contemporary fiction, she is the author of the bestselling young adult fiction series, The Princess Diaries. More than 25 million copies of her novels for children and adults have sold worldwide. Meg lives in Key West, Florida, with her husband.

Biography

Meg Cabot knows that one of the best cures for feeling gawky and conspicuous is reading about someone who sticks out even more than you do. Her books for young adults invariably feature girls who have extraordinary powers that carry extraordinary burdens. Cabot's Princess Diaries series offers up the secret thoughts of Mia Thermopolis, who discovers at age 14 that she is actually the princess of a small European country. This revelation adds significantly to her extant concerns about crushes, friendships, school, and other matters falling under adolescent scrutiny.

Cabot, a native of Indiana weaned on Judy Blume and Barbara Cartland, was already a successful romance novelist (as Patricia Cabot) before she began writing for young adults; her alter-alter ego, Jenny Carroll, began a new series shortly after The Princess Diaries debuted. The Carroll books are divided between the Mediator series, starring a girl who can communicate with restless ghosts; and the 1-800-WHERE-R-YOU books, in which a girl struck by lightning acquires the ability to locate missing people.

Cabot writes her books in a conspiratorial, first-person style that resonates with her readers. She has obviously kept a grip on the vernacular and the key issues of adolescence; but what makes her books so irresistible is the mixing of the mundane with the fantastic. After all, who wouldn't like to wake up and be a princess all of a sudden, or a seer? Cabot takes such offhand notions and roots them firmly in the details of average, middle-class American life. She has also tiptoed into mystery and paranormal suspense with other YA novels and series installments.

Cabot continues to write adult novels under various permutations of her given name (Meggin Patricia Cabot): from 19th-century historical romances to contemporary chick lit. And, as with her books for teens, these romances have earned praise for their lighthearted humor and well drawn characters.

Good To Know

Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Cabot:

"I am left handed."

"I hate tomatoes of any kind."

"I really wanted to be veterinarian, but I got a 410 on my math SATs."

"Writing used to be my hobby, but now that it's my job, I have no hobby -- except watching TV and laying around the pool reading US Weekly. I have tried many hobbies, such as knitting, Pilates, ballet, yoga, and guitar, but none of them have taken. So I guess I'm stuck with no hobby.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Meggin Patricia Cabot (full name); Patricia Cabot, Jenny Caroll
    2. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A. in fine arts, Indiana University, 1991
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Okay, here are the top ten reasons why I can't stand my sister Lucy:

10. I get all her hand-me-downs, even her bras.

9. When I refuse to wear her hand-me-downs, especially her bras, I get the big lecture about waste and the environment. Look, I am way concerned about the environment. But that does not mean I want to wear my sister's old bras. I told Mom I see no reason why I should even have to wear a bra, seeing as how it's not like I've got a lot to put in one, causing Lucy to remark that if I don't wear a bra now then if I ever do get anything up there, it will be all saggy like those tribal women we saw on the Discovery Channel.

8. This is another reason why I can't stand Lucy. Because she is always making these kind of remarks. What we should really do, if you ask me, is send Lucy's old bras to those tribal women.

7. Her conversations on the phone go like this: "No way. . . . So what did he say? . . . Then what did she say? . . . No way. . . . That is so totally untrue. . . . I do not. I so do not. . . . Who said that? . . . Well, it isn't true. . . . No, I do not. . . . I do not like him. . . . Well, okay, maybe I do. Oh, gotta go, call-waiting."

6. She is a cheerleader. All right? A cheerleader. Like it isn't bad enough she spends all her time waving pom-poms at a bunch of Neanderthals as they thunder up and down a football field. No, she has to do it practically every night. And since Mom and Dad are fanatical about this mealtime-is-family-time thing, guess what we are usually doing at five thirty? And who is even hungry then?

5. All of my teachers go: "You know, Samantha, when I had your sister inthis class two years ago, I never had to remind her to:

a) double space
b) carry the one
c) capitalize her nouns in Deutsch
d) remember her swimsuit
e) take off her headphones during morning announcements
f) stop drawing on her pants."

4. She has a boyfriend. And not just any boyfriend, either, but a nonjock boyfriend, something totally unheard-of in the social hierarchy of our school: a cheerleader going with a nonjock boyfriend. And it isn't even that he's not a jock. Oh, no, Jack also happens to be an urban rebel like me, only he really goes all out, you know, in the black army surplus trench coat and the Doc Martens and the straight Ds and all. Plus he wears an earring that hangs.

But even though he is not "book smart," Jack is very talented and creative artistically. For instance, he is always getting his paintings of disenfranchised American youths hung up in the caf. And nobody even graffitis them, the way they would if they were mine. Jack's paintings, I mean.

As if that is not cool enough, Mom and Dad completely hate him because of his not working up to his potential and getting suspended for his anti-authoritarianism and calling them Carol and Richard to their faces instead of Mr. and Mrs. Madison.

It is totally unfair that Lucy should not only have a cool boyfriend but a boyfriend our parents can't stand, something I have been praying for my entire life, practically.

Although actually at this point any kind of boyfriend would be acceptable.

3. In spite of the fact that she is dating an artistic rebel type instead of a jock, Lucy remains one of the most popular girls in school, routinely getting invited to parties and dances every weekend, so many that she could not possibly attend them all, and often says things like, "Hey, Sam, why don't you and Catherine go as, like, my emissaries?" even though if Catherine and I ever stepped into a party like that we would be vilified as sophomore poseurs and thrown out onto the street.

2. She gets along with Mom and Dad -- except for the whole Jack thing -- and always has. She even gets along with our little sister, Rebecca, who goes to a special school for the intellectually gifted and is practically an idiot savant.

But the number-one reason I can't stand my sister Lucy would have to be:

1. She told on me about the celebrity drawings.

Chapter One



She says she didn't mean to. She says she found them in my room, and they were so good she couldn't help showing them to Mom.

Of course, it never occurred to Lucy that she shouldn't have been in my room in the first place. When I accused her of completely violating my constitutionally protected right to personal privacy, she just looked at me like, Huh? even though she is fully taking U.S. Government this semester.

Her excuse is that she was looking for her eyelash curler.

Hello. Like I would borrow anything of hers. Especially something that had been near her big, bulbous eyeballs.

Instead of her eyelash curler, which of course I didn't have, Lucy found this week's stash of drawings, and she presented them to Mom at dinner that night.

"Well," Mom said in this very dry voice. "Now we know how you got that C-minus in German, don't we, Sam?"

This was on account of the fact that the drawings were in my German notebook.

"Is this supposed to be that guy from The Patriot?" my dad wanted to know. "Who is that you've drawn with him? Is that . . . is that Catherine?"

"German," I said, feeling that they were missing the point, "is a stupid language."

"German isn't stupid," my little sister Rebecca informed me. "The Germans can trace their heritage back to ethnic groups that existed during the days of the Roman Empire. Their language is an ancient and beautiful one that was created thousands of years ago."

"Whatever," I said. "Did you know that they capitalize all of their nouns? What is up with that?"

"Hmmm," my mother said, flipping to the front of my German notebook. "What have we here?"

My dad went, "Sam, what are you doing drawing pictures of Catherine on the back of a horse with that guy from The Patriot?"

"I think this will explain it, Richard," my mother said, and she passed the notebook back to my dad.

In my own defense, I can only state that, for better or for worse, we live in a capitalistic society. I was merely enacting my rights of individual initiative by supplying the public -- in the form of most of the female student population at John Adams Preparatory School -- with a product for which I saw there was a demand. You would think that my dad, who is an international economist with the World Bank, would understand this.

But as he read aloud from my German notebook in an astonished voice, I could tell he did not understand. He did not understand at all.

"You and Josh Hartnett," my dad read, "fifteen dollars. You and Josh Hartnett on a desert island, twenty dollars. You and Justin Timberlake, ten dollars. You and Justin Timberlake under a waterfall, fifteen dollars. You and Keanu Reeves, fifteen dollars. You and -- " My dad looked up. "Why are Keanu and Josh more than Justin?"

"Because," I explained, "Justin has less hair."

"Oh," my dad said. "I see." He went back to the list.

All-American Girl. Copyright © by Meg Cabot. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Table of Contents

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Interviews & Essays

Talking to All-American Author Meg Cabot

Barnes & Noble.com: The teenage voice you write in sounds so natural -- and your books are so in-tune with teens today. How do you do it?

Meg Cabot: My natural inner voice sounds about 16 (example of Meg's inner voice: "Ew, gross, I can't believe she's wearing that in public"), so it is very easy for me to write from the point of view of someone that age. The memories of adolescence seem to be permanently seared into my brain.

B&N.com: What were your own high school experiences like -- and how (if at all) do they figure into your writing and affect the way you write about your character's lives?

MC: My four years of high school were the most miserable of my life. When I have nightmares now, they are always about being stuck back in high school. Generally in geometry. Sometimes gym.

Fortunately, I kept detailed records of my agony. I frequently refer to the journals I kept when I was a freshman–senior for inspiration while writing my books, particularly The Princess Diaries.

B&N.com: Where did the idea for All-American Girl come from?

MC: My mom's boyfriend has three little granddaughters who live in Washington, D.C. One day I just started wondering what it would be like to grow up in a town like D.C., where so much is going on. A kid could, conceivably, even run into the president...and possibly save him from an assassin's bullet. So that's how I came up with the plot for All-American Girl. Although Sam is not based on any of my mom's boyfriend's grandkids...they are all under the age of eight.

B&N.com: Is Samantha based on anyone you know, or knew? She is an artist -- and she was thrown suddenly into the media spotlight. Is she like you?

MC: Sam's experiences and attitudes are definitely based on my own. I had an art teacher in middle school who was exactly like Sam's. She kept holding up white eggs and telling me to paint the colors in them. For a long time I thought she was nuts. Then one day, it just clicked. It took me much longer than it took Sam, though.

I haven't exactly been thrust into the limelight like Sam was, though. Coke and Pepsi are not sending me lifetime supplies of their products (sadly).

B&N.com: You write so well about Sam's "unrequited love" for Jack...and then her confusing feelings for David. Again, how do you do it? Any personal experiences with all-consuming crushes?

MC: Oh my gosh, who hasn't had a crush on a totally inappropriate person? Like Samantha, I loved (or thought I loved) a boy who was totally wrong for me -- and I think I was the only one who couldn't see it...or the fact that the perfect guy for me was there all along, just waiting for me to notice him! Thankfully I finally woke up one day, and now we've been married for almost ten years.

B&N.com: Were you a big reader when you were growing up? Can you name a few of your favorite children's books?

MC: I read almost exclusively sci-fi fantasy as a kid: Tolkien, Lloyd Alexander, Susan Cooper. I've been expanding my horizons lately, and am loving Tamora Pierce, Maud Hart Lovelace, and Louise Rennison.

B&N.com: Now that one of your books (The Princess Diaries) has been made into a movie -- and you have others optioned -- has your writing changed (i.e., do you write more for the screen)?

MC: The only thing about my writing that's changed is that I am finally making a living doing it, so I no longer have my "day job" (assistant managing a 700-bed freshman dorm at New York University) and can write full time. And the good thing is that I have enough money saved up so that if my next book really bombs, I won't have to go back to listening to kids complain about their roommates any time soon (I hope).

B&N.com: Does your success surprise you? How has it changed your life?

MC: Well, I have a car for the first time in my life (even though I don't drive). And I own real estate in Manhattan, something I never thought would happen. And I got the one thing I've always wanted: a whirlpool tub! I sit in it for hours every night (I am not kidding), reading.

I guess I'm not as surprised about my books' success as some of my family members and ex-boyfriends are. Especially the ex-boyfriends.

B&N.com: What is next for Meg Cabot -- what can we look forward to?

MC: Lately, I have been combining my two loves -- YAs and historicals -- by writing YA historicals. I will have two out soon: Nicola and the Viscount and Victoria and Rogue. These are fun romances that are totally appropriate for the 12-and-up crowd. But I'm not abandoning my adult books! I have two coming out soon, under the name Meggin Cabot: The Boy Next Door (October 2002) and She Went All the Way (December 2002), humorous romantic mysteries that are set in the here-and-now! And in January 2003, Haunted, the latest installment of my YA series The Mediator, will be out, followed in Spring 2003 by The Princess Diaries 4: Princess in Waiting.

Phew! Am I tired! Good thing I've got that whirlpool tub waiting....

B&N.com: Can you give me a list of the top ten reasons why you love your life?

MC: 10. I get to wear pajamas all day long.
9. I can go to bed whenever I want.
8. I can eat popcorn for lunch, ice cream for dinner.
7. No homework, ever.
6. I got to meet Julie Andrews.
5. I have 300 channels, and can watch TV all day (and frequently do).
4. I live in New York City, the greatest city in the world.
3. I got to meet Judy Blume.
2. I have a total hottie for a husband.
1. I get paid to make things up!

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 799 )
Rating Distribution

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(578)

4 Star

(114)

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(48)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 800 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2011

    BEST BOOK IVE EVR READ!!!!

    AFTER READIBG THIS MEG CABOT HAS BECOME MY FAVORITE AUTHOR FOR MY AGE OF GIRLS 11-14 SHE ROCKS. ALSO I LOVE STUFF ABOUT THE WHITE HOUSE AND PRESIDENT AND SECRECT SERVICE SO I HIGHLY RECOMMEND!!!!!!! BUY THIS BOOK!!!!

    45 out of 56 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 12, 2011

    Best book ive ever read!!!!

    Samantha Madison is my role model. She has a strong personality and she isnt afraid to express herself. The story is entertainingly told from her perspective and i highly recommend buying this book. 8)

    31 out of 34 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 4, 2011

    SUCH A DARLING BOOK

    LOVED THIS BOOK!!!!! It was so cute and sweet and original. I could not put it down. Samatha had such entertaining thoughts. It is amazing how well Meg Cabot captured a teenaged girls mind so well. It was not all like lovey dovey romance novels for teens but more focused on the feeing of being around your love. On top of all that awkard moments with your crush it is all in the public eye. It is defently a new way of putting the teenagers falling love.

    21 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    All American Girl

    All American Girl, is a great story for an englishclass and to read as independent reading.

    15 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 5, 2011

    Love it!

    O my goodness i love this book i could not put it down read in less than 1 day!!!!!!!!!!!

    15 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 1, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    FUUNNNNYYY

    I LOVE THIS BOOK SOOOO MUCH. Very well-written and hilarious.

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    it was ok

    i enjoyed reading this book but there was just something about it that felt off cause i didn't like it. but idk what that something is so i still recommend it. this is about a girl who accidently saves the president. meg caobt is a great writer and also recommend the mediator series and the airhead series (both by meg cabot). if you liked this book i also recommend the Gallagher Girls series: id tell you i love you but then id have to kill you, cross my heart and hope to spy, and don't judge a girl by her cover (don't judge a girl by her cover is the most like this book but you have to read the first two first or it wont make since)

    8 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    I enjoyed this book

    I don't really like Meg Cabot's Princess Diaries, but I really enjoyed this book. It was really funny and enjoyable, and I kept wanting to find out what happened to Samantha. I think anyone who reads this book will really anjoy it.

    8 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2003

    Very Disappointed

    Those of you, like myself, who are very excited to get your hands on the newest Meg Cabot will be extremely disappointed. I loved the princess diaries but was enraged to find that this book was exactly the same, she just changed the girl's hair color, made her goth instead of dork, hamburger addict instead of vegetarian, gave her a dog instead of a cat and gave her presidential connections instead of royal ones. Thanks, Ms. Cabot for Mia, but did you have to clone her and change her name to Samantha to make yourself some money?

    8 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2012

    Not for everyone

    Even though i really liked this book it is not a book everyone might like to read. For example, I enjoyed the bit of romance in the book but not evertone would agree. Some people i know might get a little bored with the book. Also it is more for the middle school to high school crowd. I wouldnt recommend this to a 3rd grader. But overall it is a very good book.

    7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2012

    Amazing

    I am 9 years old and Meg Cabot just became my all time favorite author. It is a great book and I recamend it to anyone who wants an entertaining book they can not put down.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    Horrible book

    This book is completly horrible. Just horrible. I got the sample but i loud not even finish it because it was that bad. Don't waste your money on this horrible book.

    5 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 29, 2011

    Fantastic

    I loved this book finished it in less than a day! Meg cabot is a very talented author read this book!

    5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2012

    Aynonoumus

    Is this book inapropiate please tell meeeeee? im 9 by the way just to let u know.

    4 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    What a cool book

    WOW this book is an amazing book. It is so good because the author does a great job of not leting you put down the book. I think that any girl 10 and older will really enjoy this book. If you like this book reply and tell me what you like about it. You will NOT regret it, believe me I know what it is like finding a book you really like.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2004

    ONE OF MY FAVORITE BOOKS!!!

    This book is great.The Meg Cabots books are always good but this one was some how better. If your looking for a book to read this is the book that your looking for. An all around AWESOME book.

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2012

    No book

    Do not buy this book. I read the 1st chapter and hated it. Sam and david? Im warning you to not waste your $. This is a no star book

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 22, 2012

    I've had this book since 2004 if not '03. I loved this book and

    I've had this book since 2004 if not '03. I loved this book and over the years i always go back to it and it brings back so many memories. I first read this book when i was 11 now i'm in college and i still love it. I might even get a new one since mines is all worn out. This book will bring a smile to your face, i don't know how anyone could hate it and i find Sam to be more interesting than Mia (sorry. But i do love the princess diaries too). It is an easy read, especially if your looking for a book to pass time not if your looking for something with a deep emotional heart-breaking story. I recommend the sequel to this book ready or not where Sam is more grown up; although i liked the first one better because Cabot took her time whereas some of the last names and facts where wrong on the second one with Lucy's boyfriend for example.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2012

    Great book:)

    Buy this book.....it is slightly educatuonal, fun, hilarious, and you feel like you are living the story being told.....highly recommended:)

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    Ciersa36847

    This book was good but not one of those books you cant put down. I read up tl the 5th chapter and got bored

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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