All American: Two Young Men, the 2001 Army-Navy Game and the War They Fought in Iraq [NOOK Book]

Overview

In December 2001, as fires still burned beneath the ruins of the World Trade Center, West Point cadet Chad Jenkins and Naval Academy midshipman Brian Stann faced off at Veterans Stadium in Philadel-phia in what would become the most-watched college football game of the decade: the matchup between the Army Black Knights and the Navy Midshipmen.

At opposing stadiums throughout the season, the Army and Navy teams, used to jeers from their oppo-nents' fans, had instead been greeted ...

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All American: Two Young Men, the 2001 Army-Navy Game and the War They Fought in Iraq

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Overview

In December 2001, as fires still burned beneath the ruins of the World Trade Center, West Point cadet Chad Jenkins and Naval Academy midshipman Brian Stann faced off at Veterans Stadium in Philadel-phia in what would become the most-watched college football game of the decade: the matchup between the Army Black Knights and the Navy Midshipmen.

At opposing stadiums throughout the season, the Army and Navy teams, used to jeers from their oppo-nents' fans, had instead been greeted with standing ovations from respectful crowds who knew that these young players, military officers in training, were soon going to fight a war in the Middle East. On this day, before this momentous game, President George W. Bush—along with others such as General Norman Schwarzkopf and Senator John McCain—visited both locker rooms before watching the game from the sidelines.

When Stann, a Navy linebacker, first came into contact with Jenkins, the Army quarterback, his team was behind by thirteen points. Yet he managed to land the perfect tackle against Jenkins. Though these two players would not meet again for a decade, Stann and Jenkins shared the same path: both went to war. As first-class officers serving several tours of duty, they led soldiers and marines and participated in events they never imagined possible.

A moving and fascinating dual profile of honor, duty, courage, and competition, All American is a thoughtful exploration of American character and values, embodied in the lives of two remarkable young men.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 09/30/2013
Eubanks, sportswriter and author of To Win and Die in Dixie, takes a close look at the first Army–Navy football game after 9/11 and two men, Brian Stann, a former linebacker for the Naval Academy, and Chad Jenkins, a former quarterback at West Point , who went to on to serve their country in Iraq. As he explores how each man chose to attend a service academy, where the rigors of playing football at a school where practice can often feel like a respite from the studies, Eubanks creates an engaging narrative worthy of any sports movie. But it is in the book’s second half when the story jumps from interesting to captivating. From their officer training to their tours of duty in some of the most dangerous and notorious places in the world, like Fallujah and Al Qa’im, Eubanks not only captures the nature of two men who love what they do, but also the pressures that their bodies, psyches, and families endure. Eubanks does his subjects justice by getting out of the way and letting the men take center stage; as each man finds out how painful it is to lose friends on the battlefield as compared to games on the playing field, the book becomes less a celebration of glories of battle and more a testament to fallen heroes. (Nov.)
Hall of Fame Coach LOU HOLTZ
“The people who went to [service] academies embody words like ‘hero’ and ‘courageous.’ Steve Eubanks captures that courage perfectly in this book by showing the dedication, honor, and love for each other and for our country that are inherent in academy graduates.”
Epoch Times
All American... is a masterpiece. ... A most noteworthy book.”
BLACKFIVE.NET
”A MUST READ”
MyShelf
GRIPPING ... A must-read.”
Hall of Fame Coach Lou Holtz
“The people who went to [service] academies embody words like ‘hero’ and ‘courageous.’ Steve Eubanks captures that courage perfectly in this book by showing the dedication, honor, and love for each other and for our country that are inherent in academy graduates.”
John Feinstein
There is nothing like Army-Navy... The young men who play... have all volunteered to die for their country... [Eubanks] tells you how special you have to be to play in this game—and to... make the kinds of sacrifices no other athletes even think about making...”
DAVID LIPSKY
“There are two stories in American life—how we play, how we fight. Steve Eubanks tells a masterful story about both, along with a story of two extraordinary people, from two extraordinary institutions, moving through extraordinary times. All American is... inspiring... It’s history lived from the inside.”
JOHN FEINSTEIN
There is nothing like Army-Navy... The young men who play... have all volunteered to die for their country... [Eubanks] tells you how special you have to be to play in this game—and to... make the kinds of sacrifices no other athletes even think about making...”
Kirkus Reviews
2013-10-20
Veteran journalist Eubanks (To Win and Die in Dixie: The Birth of the Modern Golf Swing and the Mysterious Death of Its Creator, 2010, etc.) follows the careers of two young men: one a cadet at West Point, the other a midshipman at the Naval Academy, from 9/11 to the present. This paean to patriotism and a fiercely focused definition of manhood and patriotism has all the subtlety of a Fourth of July parade or a halftime show on Veterans Day. The author gives us the backgrounds of his two principals (Chad at West Point, Brian at Annapolis), beginning with a moment in the 2001 Army-Navy game (played only months after 9/11), when linebacker Brian tackled quarterback Chad--their first meeting. Then Eubanks alternates the stories of the two, celebrating along the way the traditional virtues of manliness and patriotism that these two young men embody. To the author's credit, we do get glimpses of the men's warts. Brian survived a court martial for sexual assault against a female officer; Chad acted like a pig on spring break in Florida (though the author can't quite bring himself to characterize it as such). Both eventually end up in Iraq; the author does not question America's involvement but does celebrate the heroism of his principals, both of whom won--deservedly--battlefield honors. Eubanks also describes the love lives of each man, both of whom eventually left the military. Chad tried a few things before becoming an FBI agent, a position he eventually left for the private security sector; Brian became an accomplished cage fighter then segued into running his own fight-training enterprise. Along the way, the author revisits subsequent Army-Navy games and delivers some play-by-play--of action on the gridiron and on the streets of Fallujah. Long on heroism, short on analysis and critical acumen.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062202833
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/29/2013
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 90,593
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Steve Eubanks is a New York Times bestselling author and award-winning writer whose work has appeared in Sports Illustrated, Golf Digest, Garden & Gun, and USA Today, and on FoxSports.com, Yahoo!, and PGATour.com. A former college golfer and PGA club pro, he is the author of more than thirty books. He lives in Peachtree City, Georgia, with his wife and children.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2013

    These are true heroes who have fought for our freedom!

    These are true heroes who have fought for our freedom!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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