All Bound Up Together: The Woman Question in African American Public Culture, 1830-1900 / Edition 1

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Overview

The place of women's rights in African American public culture has been an enduring question, one that has long engaged activists, commentators, and scholars. All Bound Up Together explores the roles black women played in their communities' social movements and the consequences of elevating women into positions of visibility and leadership. Martha Jones reveals how, through the nineteenth century, the "woman question" was at the core of movements against slavery and for civil rights.

Unlike white women activists, who often created their own institutions separate from men, black women, Jones explains, often organized within already existing institutions—churches, political organizations, mutual aid societies, and schools. Covering three generations of black women activists, Jones demonstrates that their approach was not unanimous or monolithic but changed over time and took a variety of forms, from a woman's right to control her body to her right to vote. Through a far-ranging look at politics, church, and social life, Jones demonstrates how women have helped shape the course of black public culture.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Convincingly illustrates the degree to which the women question influenced all aspects of northern black culture from the 1830s onward. . . . Well-written and thoroughly researched.—Journal of Social History
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Martha S. Jones is associate professor of history and Afroamerican and African studies and visiting professor of law at the University of Michigan.

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Table of Contents


Introduction     1
Female Influence Is Powerful: Respectability, Responsibility, and Setting the Terms of the Woman Question Debate     23
Right Is of No Sex: Reframing the Debate through the Rights of Women     59
Not a Woman's Rights Convention: Remaking Public Culture in the Era of Dred Scott v. Sanford     87
Something Very Novel and Strange: Civil War, Emancipation, and the Remaking of African American Public Culture     119
Make Us a Power: Churchwomen's Politics and the Campaign for Women's Rights     151
Too Much Useless Male Timber: The Nadir, the Woman's Era, and the Question of Women's Ordination     173
Conclusion     205
Notes     209
Selected Bibliography     271
Acknowledgments     301
Index     305
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