All Clever Men, Who Make Their Way: Critical Discourse in the Old South

All Clever Men, Who Make Their Way: Critical Discourse in the Old South

by Michael O'Brien, James Hervey Smith, Jesse Burton Harrison, Hugh Swinton Legaré, Thomas Roderick Dew
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

From the pages of forgotten journals and literary magazines Michael O'Brien assembles fourteen pieces that effectively challenge the long-prevailing notion that the mind of the Old South was superficial, unintellectual, and obsessed with race and slavery. In this book are discourses on subjects ranging from English empirical thought to neoclassical aesthetics, from

Overview

From the pages of forgotten journals and literary magazines Michael O'Brien assembles fourteen pieces that effectively challenge the long-prevailing notion that the mind of the Old South was superficial, unintellectual, and obsessed with race and slavery. In this book are discourses on subjects ranging from English empirical thought to neoclassical aesthetics, from the enfranchisement of women to transcendental theology, from the works of Hawthorne and Emerson to the social system of Virginia.

Editorial Reviews

Journal of Southern History

All Clever Men Who Make Their Way deserves a serious reading. Surveying the problems students of southern antebellum thinking face, which include the anonymity of many essayists, O'Brien's lively introduction sheds light on the society itself.

Journal of the Early Republic

This handsomely designed and printed book deserves wide circulation and readership. The book testifies to the justice of giving the antebellum southern an 'uninterrupted moment in the court of historical opinion.' O'Brien has called the court to order and presented an argument. One hopes other historians will do the same.

Georgia Historical Quarterly

If we want to understand the traditions of the Old South, especially of the towns and cities, we shall have to follow O'Brien's advice and look not only at tax lists and census reports (which are indisputably important sources) but also at books and journals that were directed to an audience of men and women who wanted to view themselves as reasonable people living in a world hospitable to rationality.

From the Publisher

"All Clever Men Who Make Their Way deserves a serious reading. Surveying the problems students of southern antebellum thinking face, which include the anonymity of many essayists, O'Brien's lively introduction sheds light on the society itself."--Journal of Southern History

"This handsomely designed and printed book deserves wide circulation and readership. The book testifies to the justice of giving the antebellum southern an 'uninterrupted moment in the court of historical opinion.' O'Brien has called the court to order and presented an argument. One hopes other historians will do the same."--Journal of the Early Republic

"If we want to understand the traditions of the Old South, especially of the towns and cities, we shall have to follow O'Brien's advice and look not only at tax lists and census reports (which are indisputably important sources) but also at books and journals that were directed to an audience of men and women who wanted to view themselves as reasonable people living in a world hospitable to rationality."--Georgia Historical Quarterly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780820332017
Publisher:
University of Georgia Press
Publication date:
05/01/2008
Series:
Brown Thrasher Books Series
Pages:
488
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.09(d)

Meet the Author

Michael O'Brien is Professor of American Intellectual History at the University of Cambridge, a Fellow of Jesus College, and a Fellow of the British Academy. He was the longtime series editor of the Publications of the Southern Texts Society. O'Brien is the author or editor of several books on southern intellectual history, including the Bancroft Prize-winner Conjectures of Order, which was also a Nominated Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >