All Girls: Single-Sex Education And Why It Matters by Karen Stabiner, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
All Girls: Single-Sex Education And Why It Matters

All Girls: Single-Sex Education And Why It Matters

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by Karen Stabiner
     
 

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In All Girls, acclaimed journalist Karen Stabiner spends a pivotal year with the young women of two very different girls' schools: Marlborough, an elite prep school in Los Angeles, and The Young Women's Leadership School of East Harlem, an embattled, controversial experiment within the New York City public school system. On both coasts, Stabiner's

Overview

In All Girls, acclaimed journalist Karen Stabiner spends a pivotal year with the young women of two very different girls' schools: Marlborough, an elite prep school in Los Angeles, and The Young Women's Leadership School of East Harlem, an embattled, controversial experiment within the New York City public school system. On both coasts, Stabiner's subjects are fascinating young women on the brink of adulthood, whose choices and academic performance will affect the course of their lives.

All Girls offers an insider's perspective on the daily triumphs and frustrations of teachers and students, parents, and advocates of single-sex education. It dramatically brings to new life the debate about single-sex education and the perils faced by adolescent girls, which Mary Pipher first brought to national attention with her groundbreaking bestseller Reviving Ophelia.

Through Stabiner's vivid, perceptive reporting on her diverse real-life subjects, we recognize our children, our friends, and our relatives. We feel invested in their stories from the very first gripping chapter. The result is an urgent, definitive book for anyone involved in the education of a girl.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Journalist Stabiner (To Dance with the Devil: The New War on Breast Cancer) turns her incisive reporting skills to life at two girls' schools in this paean to single-sex education. She spent a year observing students at Marlborough, an elite Los Angeles prep school, and at The Young Women's Leadership School (TYWLS), a public school in East Harlem. Alternating chapters between the schools, Stabiner traces the aspirations and accomplishments of the girls and their teachers. Painting a vivid picture of the students' lives, the book seems at times more like a novel than nonfiction, with a cast of over 22 characters. Stabiner resists imbuing the text with her own opinions, and she explains that if she has included her subjects' feelings or private thoughts it's because "they told me about them." As a strong "show, don't tell" writer, she lets readers learn through classroom scenarios, showing, for instance, that it can be trying for teachers to get adolescent girls to speak up in class, yet by the end of the year, many have gained the confidence to speak out and to concentrate on honing their brain power rather than their popularity. Stabiner does not include a progressive co-ed school for purposes of comparison, thus readers may feel that the jury is still out on single-sex education. Her fly-on-the-wall method is effective, and parents wondering what an all-girls school is really like will learn much from her observations. Those seeking practical tips, however, won't find them here. Agent, Lynn Nesbit. (Aug. 5) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
All-girl schools: are they throwbacks to pre-women's lib days or cutting-edge public education systems? Stabiner (To Dance with the Devil: The New War on Breast Cancer) here attempts to uncover the answer. For her research, she spent one school year at two girls' schools Marlborough, an elite prep school in Los Angeles, and the Young Women's Leadership School (TYWLS), an experimental and controversial public school program in East Harlem, New York. In All Girls, the reader meets Amy Lopez, one of the brightest students in her grade at TYWLS; Katie Tower, a senior at Marlborough who is expected to do great things in her final year because of her past schoolwork; Christina Kim, the best student in Marlborough's senior class; and TYWLS's Maryam Zohny, the daughter of Egyptian immigrants, who sacrifices play for homework to make something of herself and make her widowed mother proud. Stabiner follows these four and many of their classmates through the school year and details teachers and administrators as well. In her introduction, she confesses that while she first thought girls' schools were for girls who couldn't handle the real world, after spending a school year in such institutions and seeing how self-confident and comfortable the students were, she changed her mind. Stabiner does not advocate the complete overhaul of our educational system to create single-sex institutions but instead aims to stir educators and parents to dialog and, she hopes, action by clearly and thoughtfully presenting evidence of the benefits of such schools. For most public libraries. Terry Christner, Hutchinson P.L., KS

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781573222075
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/26/2002
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.18(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

What People are saying about this

Susan Estrich
A vital contribution to the debate on the education of girls. (Susan Estrich, author of Sex & Power)
Michael Thompson
A beautifully drawn portrait of two all-girls schools...(Michael Thompson, Ph.D., co-author of Raising Cain and Best Friends, Worst Enemies)
National Coalition of Girls Schools
Through the stories of the students and their families [Stabiner] dismantles lingering myths and misperceptions about the girls' school experience. (Whitney Ransome and Meg Milne Moulton, Executive Directors, National Coalition of Girls' Schools)
David Sadker
A moving portrait of just what's happening behind the doors of all-girls schools. (David Sadker, American University, co-author of Failing at Fairness: How Our Schools Cheat Girls)

Meet the Author

Karen Stabiner is the author of the bestselling New York Times Notable Book To Dance with the Devil: The New War on Breast Cancer and Inventing Desire, an acclaimed portrait of the advertising industry. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The New Yorker, and Vogue.

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