All Hell Broke Loose: Experiences of Young People During the Armistice Day 1940 Blizzard

All Hell Broke Loose: Experiences of Young People During the Armistice Day 1940 Blizzard

4.5 2
by William H. Hull
     
 

How young people coped with the storm of the century -

59 people died in Minnesota on November 11, 1940 when the worst blizzard ever hit Minnesota unexpectedly. Violet walked from Seven Corners in Minneapolis to 32nd street with snow over her knees, in subzero temperature, with only saddle oxfords and a light wrap. Farmers lost thousands of turkeys - Herb tells

Overview

How young people coped with the storm of the century -

59 people died in Minnesota on November 11, 1940 when the worst blizzard ever hit Minnesota unexpectedly. Violet walked from Seven Corners in Minneapolis to 32nd street with snow over her knees, in subzero temperature, with only saddle oxfords and a light wrap. Farmers lost thousands of turkeys - Herb tells of rendering a half million frozen gobblers. Alvin in Warroad barely got his boat back to the dock. Andy and a group of Iron Rangers, preparing for deer hunting the next weekend, spent this weekend struggling through the blizzard, barely saving their lives. Dwight, of Marshall, crawled 200 yards to build a fire for a man about to freeze to death. Sherman kept isolated Albert Lea in touch with the world. Read these stories and many more in All Hell Broke Loose, and experience the blizzard.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781882376964
Publisher:
Thunder Bay Press MI
Publication date:
11/15/2004
Pages:
236
Sales rank:
614,249
Product dimensions:
5.42(w) x 8.46(h) x 0.65(d)

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All Hell Broke Loose: Experiences of Young People During the Armistice Day 1940 Blizzard 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
babs3769 More than 1 year ago
It's not "well-written", in that it's not presented as a cohesive "story". It's a segmented collection of the personal memories of regular individuals who were asked to recount, after many years, their experiences of this storm. The stories were published fairly verbatim, so there isn't much (if any) extrapolation. But it's a fascinating historical accounting; sometimes uplifting, sometimes sobering, sometimes dull and sometimes outright funny. This book is a treasure for anyone who values regional, recent history. (Personally, I enjoy re-reading it yearly as practical reminder of how we lived (or died) just a few scant years ago before the advent and advantage of Doppler Radar and the omni-prescient Weather Channel). My two cents.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you're over 50 years old and grew up in Minnesota, you heard about the "Armistice Day Blizzard" from your parents. It was one of those "significant emotional events"--not unlike the Kennedy assassination--that defined that generation. William H. Hull recorded the experiences of those who survived, and stories of those who did not. Not only is his account a record of these oral histories, but it documents how differently people lived in 1940--many without conveniences (electricity, running water) we take for granted. If you're interested in Minnesota history or weather, this book is not to be missed. Mr. Hull has done a great service by documenting these accounts before they were lost to history.