All I Did Was Shoot My Man (Leonid McGill Series #4)

( 28 )

Overview

Zella Grisham never denied shooting her boyfriend. That’s not why she did eight years of hard time on a sixteen-year sentence. It’s that the shooting inadvertently led to charges of grand theft. Talk about bad luck.

Leonid McGill has reasons to believe she’s innocent. But reopening the case is only serving to unsettle McGill’s private life even further—and expose a family secret that’s like a kick to the gut.

As the case unfolds, as the truth ...

See more details below
Paperback
$11.98
BN.com price
(Save 20%)$15.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (41) from $1.99   
  • New (17) from $1.99   
  • Used (24) from $1.99   
All I Did Was Shoot My Man (Leonid McGill Series #4)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

Zella Grisham never denied shooting her boyfriend. That’s not why she did eight years of hard time on a sixteen-year sentence. It’s that the shooting inadvertently led to charges of grand theft. Talk about bad luck.

Leonid McGill has reasons to believe she’s innocent. But reopening the case is only serving to unsettle McGill’s private life even further—and expose a family secret that’s like a kick to the gut.

As the case unfolds, as the truth of what happened eight years ago becomes more damning and more complex than anyone dreamed, McGill and Zella realize that everyone is guilty of something, and that sometimes the sins of the past can be too damaging to ever forget. Or ever forgive.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Marilyn Stasio
A big city never looks the same once you've walked its streets with a hard-boiled private eye. Preferably someone as perceptive and thoughtful as Leonid McGill, the shady but honorable bruiser-for-hire in an addictive series of New York crime novels by Walter Mosley. A former mob fixer who has gone straight, McGill doesn't so much walk the city as case it for danger. Keeping pace with him is as much an education as an adventure.
The Washington Post - Yvonne Zipp
Mosley…is in fine form in his fourth McGill mystery, a complicated tale of atonement and family.
Publishers Weekly
In Mosley’s fourth Leonid McGill mystery (after 2011’s When the Thrill Is Gone), the best in the series to date, the New York City PI tries to atone for a misdeed from his checkered past. Eight years earlier, McGill helped frame Zella Grisham for a part in the biggest Wall Street robbery in history— million stolen from Rutgers Assurance Corp. Zella was guilty of shooting her man, Harry Tangelo, when she found him in bed with her best friend, Minnie Lesser, but the eight years she served were due to the frame, not the shooting. McGill manages to get Zella released, setting in motion a chain of deadly events. Meanwhile, his difficult family life reaches full boil with each of his three adult children, Twill, Dimitri, and Shelly, as well as with his hard-drinking wife, Katrina. Unraveling the truth behind the robbery and the unrecovered millions tests McGill’s skills to the utmost in this complex, satisfying entry. (Jan.)
Library Journal
In this fourth Leonid McGill mystery (after When the Thrill Is Gone), Mosley uses his exceptional storytelling skills to depict how his conflicted and compassionate PI sabotages himself as he battles to redeem himself and make amends to his family and coworkers. McGill is hired to investigate a strange case in which Zella Grisham admits to shooting her scheming husband after catching him in bed with another woman. Yet she's fuzzy about the $80,000 found in her closet that was part of a $6 million heist. Out on the mean streets of Manhattan, McGill reacquaints himself with his estranged, alcoholic wife; his misguided, eldest son, who left college to live with a prostitute; and his youngest son, who chooses to work as McGill's partner. VERDICT General readers and Mosley fans will appreciate his characteristically fine writing as well as the internal struggles Mosley inflicts on his protagonists. [See Prepub Alert, 7/18/11.]—Jerry P. Miller, Cambridge, MA
Kirkus Reviews
The release of a convicted killer who doesn't happen to be a thief offers another crack at redemption for impossibly compromised New York private eye Leonid McGill (When the Thrill Is Gone, 2011, etc.). Zella Grisham is the only client McGill's ever had whom he knows to be innocent. Who could know better than him, when gambler Stumpy Brown, worried that the NYPD would link him to the $58 million Rutgers Assurance heist, hired McGill nine years ago to frame her for the theft? As Stumpy pointed out at the time, Zella made the perfect patsy because she was already headed for jail after shooting her lover Harry Tangelo when she found him in bed with Minnie Lesser, her former best friend. Now that McGill's lawyer, Breland Lewis, has wangled Zella's release, the frame-up isn't looking like such a good idea. Harry Tangelo has disappeared. So has the daughter Zella gave up for adoption. There's no trace of the missing $58 million, and McGill has no idea where to look for the loot. On the plus side, everyone he runs into, from low-rent grifter Sweet Lemon Charles to Rutgers bigwig Johann Brighton, acts as if they're involved in some sort of felonious activity. As usual, the list of suspicious characters extends to McGill's own family, even before they're nearly killed by a pair of nameless intruders. His wife Katrina, who pulled the plug on their sex life years ago, seems determined to drink herself to death. His blood son, Dimitri, has hooked up with unsuitable Tatyana Baranovich, an ex-hooker from Belarus, and plans to move in with her. McGill just hopes he can do a better job rescuing Katrina's son Twill from the life of crime he seems destined for than he's doing rescuing Zella Grisham from the consequences of the crime she never committed. Overplotted even by Mosley's standards, with precious little chance to savor each scene and speaker before they're hustled offstage to make room for the next.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451239167
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 2/5/2013
  • Series: Leonid McGill Series , #4
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 347,965
  • Product dimensions: 5.56 (w) x 8.21 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author

Walter Mosley is one of America’s most celebrated, beloved, and bestselling writers. His books have been translated into at least twenty-one languages, and have won numerous awards. Born in Los Angeles, Mosley lives in New York City.

Biography

When President Bill Clinton announced that Walter Mosley was one of his favorite writers, Black Betty (1994), Mosley's third detective novel featuring African American P.I. Easy Rawlins, soared up the bestseller lists. It's little wonder Clinton is a fan: Mosley's writing, an edgy, atmospheric blend of literary and pulp fiction, is like nobody else's. Some of his books are detective fiction, some are sci-fi, and all defy easy categorization.

Mosley was born in Los Angeles, traveled east to college, and found his way into writing fiction by way of working as a computer programmer, caterer, and potter. His first Easy Rawlins book, Gone Fishin' didn't find a publisher, but the next, Devil in a Blue Dress (1990) most certainly did -- and the world was introduced to a startlingly different P.I.

Part of the success of the Easy Rawlins series is Mosley's gift for character development. Easy, who stumbles into detective work after being laid off by the aircraft industry, ages in real time in the novels, marries, and experiences believable financial troubles and successes. In addition, Mosley's ability to evoke atmosphere -- the dangers and complexities of life in the toughest neighborhoods of Los Angeles -- truly shines. His treatment of historic detail (the Rawlins books take place in Los Angeles from the 1940s to the mid-1960s) is impeccable, his dialogue fine-tuned and dead-on.

In 2002, Mosley introduced a new series featuring Fearless Jones, an Army vet with a rigid moral compass, and his friend, a used-bookstore owner named Paris Minton. The series is set in the black neighborhoods of 1950s L.A. and captures the racial climate of the times. Mosley himself summed up the first book, 2002's Fearless Jones, as "comic noir with a fringe of social realism."

Despite the success of his bestselling crime series, Mosley is a writer who resolutely resists pigeonholing. He regularly pens literary fiction, short stories, essays, and sci-fi novels, and he has made bold forays into erotica, YA fiction, and political polemic. "I didn't start off being a mystery writer," he said in an interview with NPR. "There's many things that I am." Fans of this talented, genre-bending author could not agree more!

Good To Know

Mosley won a Grammy award in 2002 in the category of "Best Album Notes" for Richard Pryor.... And It's Deep, Too! The Complete Warner Bros. Recordings (1968-1992).

Mosley is an avid potter in his spare time.

In our 2004 interview, Mosley reveals:

"I was a computer programmer for 15 years before publishing my first book. I am an avid collector of comic books. And I believe that war is rarely the answer, especially not for its innocent victims."

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 12, 1952
    2. Place of Birth:
      Los Angeles, California
    1. Education:
      B.A., Johnson State College
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 2, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Oh What a Tangled Web We Weave

    Walter Mosley continues his winning ways with this fast paced, hard hitting, twisted web of a mystery. If you haven't started reading Mosley, you are truly missing out on some very literate and well plotted mysteries. Leonid McGill has a problem, well, one of many. Years ago at a mobster's request, he planted evidence against a woman, Zella Grisham, that implicated her as an accomplice in a multimillion dollar robbery. She was already on the fast track to prison, having shot and wounded her husband three times after finding him in bed with another woman. Over the years, McGill has been changing his ways, regretting many of the things he had done in his dark past. After seven years in prison, Zella is released after McGill founds a way to have the robbery evidence discredited without implicating himself. McGill tries furtively to further pay his debt to Zella by finding out who really stole the corporate millions. Bodies soon start to pile up around him as someone is covering their trail. When his family is threatened McGill turns up the heat. Provided for review by the well read folks at Library Thing and Riverhead Books.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2012

    All I Did Was Shoot My Man

    I hate to give a brotha a bad review BUT this is truly one of the worst reads in the 10 years of our book club history. Gave him a second chance...not worthy of a third.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2012

    Interesting Read!!!

    Couldn't quite connect! Too many characters and plot way too busy!! It was hard to keep track of who was who and who was doing what!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2012

    All I Did Was Shoot My Man

    I love the Easy Rawlins series, but McGill has way too many characters to keep track of. Probably terrific for someone who can.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Past and Present

    Leonid Trotter (“LT”) McGill is a 55-year-old African-American man, a former boxer, con man, fixer and over-all reprobate turned [relatively honest] PI is one of the more unusual characters in mystery fiction. Married, he has little if anything to do with his wife. As far as his three children are concerned, he acknowledges that two are not his, but he loves and nurtures all. His collection of friends and associates are as unconventional as he is. And so are the books in the series, all somewhat bizarre but very enjoyable.

    The plots of the books, while intricate and complicated, tend to be odd. And the present installment is no different. In the past, LT framed a young woman who shot her boyfriend three times, when she came home to find him in bed with her best friend. Since she was destined to go to jail anyway, he planted evidence in her locker of complicity in a $548 million heist from an insurance company. Some years later, LT finds the “false” information that led to her conviction following which his lawyer gets her released from prison. As a result, a number of events take place, including an attempt on LT’s life, along with the murders of several others. Of course, it’s up to him to solve the case.

    Written in a style that sometimes defies belief, the complexity and insight of the novel and, especially, the LT character, are overwhelming. With each book, development of LT as a person deepens, and the reader gains substantial knowledge of the man.

    Highly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    ON THE FENCE WITH THIS ONE

    FIRST OFF, THIS BOOK HAD WAY TO MANY CHARACTERS FOR YOU TO KEEP TRACK OF. JUST WHEN YOU THINK YOU KNOW WHO IS WHO, MOSLEY, INTRODUCES YOU TO SOMEONE ELSE. THEN IT TOOK WAY TO LONG TO BUILD UP STEAM TO HOLD MY ATTENTION. I NEVER GOT EXCITED ABOUT READING THIS BOOK. I MOSTLY WAS LOOKING FORWARD TO IT ENDING. READ AT YOUR OWN RISK........

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 27, 2012

    Great addition to the series

    Walter Mosely’s Leonid McGill is not a good man. He isn’t necessarily a bad man either, but he has done some really bad things in the past. Product of a dysfunctional home and the enabler of another of his own making, he has decided to change his life around and atone for the wrong he has done. In this fourth outing in the series, All I Did Was Shoot My Man, this means arranging for the release of Zella Grisham, and helping her get back on her feet. Zella (to whom the title of the book refers) was framed by McGill for a larger crime than the one which she actually committed, involving a multi-million dollar heist. Once she’s out of jail however, both she and McGill discover that there is much more to the heist than either of them ever knew about. This is the basis for the action which follows. The ‘whodunit’ aspect of the book is well plotted and entertaining. I wasn’t able to figure out who was really behind the heist before the end of the book, which for me is quite unusual, so I have to say I definitely enjoyed the mystery. However, the development of McGill’s character, his interactions with his wife, children, lover and the various other persons who people his world, are without a doubt the best part of this book. As much as I love Mosely’s Easy Rawlins, Leonid McGill is fast becoming a new favorite of mine. This was a very fast-paced read, and very enjoyable. It would appeal to readers who enjoy noir with a difference, as well as interesting characters and a solid plot.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2013

    Interesting book

    Complicated, but so intelligently written. I read passages out loud to my wife. I am ordering another in this series now. That is the highest praise I can give.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 1, 2013

    One of Walter Mosley's best books

    This book starts right off as intriguing. It's LT all the way if you have all of this series. you will love this book. There is a lot of mystery and action. The ending was a surprise for sure. I can't wait for #5 to come out. a must read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 15, 2013

    Mosley at his best...

    I've loved all of Walter Mosley's books and I realy like the Leonid McGill series. This one was every bit as good. I love the way he tells a story. He makes you want to not stop reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2012

    Twill

    Love that young man, this series is a good one....i just hope there is another book b/c there is another book in there, ( what happen with the wife..the girlfriend..his dad..his kids..will they ever know the truth about there " daddy ".. and will my favorite... TWILL, will he hook up with his bff...just ..get ...to ..writing .,Mr.Mosley!, lol

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2012

    GREAT!

    This book was exciting, I loved the fights, I loved the feelings McGill shared, they're deep. I really loved Twill in the "family business", dangerous as it is, it is a good place for him. And I really love Twill!!!
    No closure for Tolstoy nor Aura here, but this is a series ;-)

    SDC

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 18, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    This was an excellent read. I really enjoy Walter Mosley books they always bring an interesting perspective on life. The blended dysfunctional family is the norm for most people we just choose not to talk about it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)