All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost

( 7 )

Overview

A haunting story of art, ambition, love, and friendship by a writer of elegant, exacting prose.
At the renowned writing school in Bonneville, every student is simultaneously terrified of and attracted to the charismatic and mysterious poet and professor Miranda Sturgis, whose high standards for art are both intimidating and inspiring. As two students, Roman and Bernard, strive to win her admiration, the lines between mentorship, friendship, and...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (49) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $2.00   
  • Used (41) from $1.99   
All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost: A Novel

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 26%)$14.95 List Price

Overview

A haunting story of art, ambition, love, and friendship by a writer of elegant, exacting prose.
At the renowned writing school in Bonneville, every student is simultaneously terrified of and attracted to the charismatic and mysterious poet and professor Miranda Sturgis, whose high standards for art are both intimidating and inspiring. As two students, Roman and Bernard, strive to win her admiration, the lines between mentorship, friendship, and love are blurred.
Roman's star rises early, and his first book wins a prestigious prize. Meanwhile, Bernard labors for years over a single poem. Secrets of the past begin to surface, friendships are broken, and Miranda continues to cast a shadow over their lives. What is the hidden burden of early promise? What are the personal costs of a life devoted to the pursuit of art? All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost is a brilliant evocation of the demands of ambition and vocation, personal loyalty and poetic truth.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Chang, director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and author of Hunger and Inheritance, sticks close to home as she follows Roman Morris from his days as an M.F.A. student in the late 1980s to his soaring career as a published poet, tenured professor, and Pulitzer Prize winner. Unfortunately, the book lends credence to the clichés that plague modern poets and the institutions that foster them: wine-fueled workshops are held by candlelight, and Roman's fantasies about his talented, beautiful, and aloof workshop professor lead to a student-teacher affair. Roman's eventual success brings out his resentment of the academy and its favoritism and politics, but this is a work of fiction, and the championing of creative writing programs should not be its cause. In Chang's hands, the world of poetry is a cliché; instead of a novel, she delivers a case study of the modern poet with little bearing in reality and characters as one-dimensional as the premise. While the language is well crafted, readers may be disappointed by the lack of quality storytelling. (Sept.)
Booklist
“Starred Review: Among the many threads Chang elegantly pursues—the fraught relationships between mentors and students, the value of poetry, the price of ambition—it is her indelible portrait of the loneliness of artistic endeavor that will haunt readers the most in this exquisitely written novel about the poet’s lot.”
Adam Haslett
“All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost offers a starkly honest portrait of people caught up in the drive to write and of the personal bargains and self-deceptions that such an ambition can entail. Lan Samantha Chang was brave to write this book, to turn her novelist's eye onto a world she knows intimately, and her bravery pays off in the unflinching final scenes.”
Scott Spencer
“What a lovely, fierce book about love, betrayal, loss, and time’s dominion over us all. Fleet, preternaturally attuned to the ebb and flow of personal history, All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost is, well, unforgettable. Lan Samantha Chang sees deeply into her characters, right down to their souls, but she wields her intelligence with the compassion of a master.”
Howard Norman
“Lucy, Roman, Bernard, and Miranda are characters you won’t soon forget. In their passionate, demanding, wrecked, and joyous literary lives, they thrive on their belief in language’s absolute authority. This deeply affecting—and elegant—novel by Lan Samantha Chang definitely offers what Leonard Cohen calls his whole career in song: All day and night, versions of the erotic. I wish I could live long enough to discover this novel in an attic trunk a hundred years in the future, and exclaim, so this is what ‘poetic education’ really meant.”
Library Journal
Miranda Sturgis is a genius professor of poetry at a renowned writing school who "bludgeons" her students with her critiques; she is cold, aloof, distant, and elusive. Yet Roman remains haunted by Miranda long after their grad-school affair, even as he, too, becomes a professor and an award-winning poet. In this melancholy tale of love, loss, and loneliness ultimately emphasizing that the cost of real literary success is a lonely life, author Chang (Inheritance) mines a world familiar to her: she is herself a University of Iowa English professor and director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Despite the subject matter, there is little actual poetry to this book, but, through his sublime reading, narrator Ramón De Ocampo manages to poeticize it. Those liking Muriel Barbery's Elegance of the Hedgehog, also available from HighBridge Audio, may enjoy. ["With her simple, elegant style, Chang achieves a clarity that few writers accomplish," read the review of the Norton hc, LJ 8/10.—Ed.]—Terry Ann Lawler, Phoenix P.L.
Library Journal
At the heart of this novel are a famous writing school and its director, Miranda Sturgis, whose students include the gifted young poets Roman and Bernard. Roman achieves early success, winning a major prize, while Bernard toils for many years to perfect a single poem. Roman had an affair with Miranda while a student but married classmate Lucy. When the affair is discovered years later, Roman's marriage and his friendship with Bernard are both destroyed, and he starts to question the cost of his success and how much of it he earned. Other topics include the relationship between student and professor; the professor's struggle to suffer mediocre students, giving up valuable creative time to mentor them; and the large question of whether teaching writing entails the dissemination of craft or the nurturing of innately gifted writers. The first woman and first Asian American to be director of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, Chang (Inheritance) writes from personal history. Her characters are three-dimensional and not predictable, and with her simple, elegant style she achieves a clarity that few writers accomplish. VERDICT This novel will have strong appeal to those interested in academia in general and writing in particular. Chang is an author worth reading now—and watching in the future.—Lisa Rohrbaugh, National Coll. Lib., Youngstown, OH
From the Publisher
“De Ocampo artfully moves the well-written novel forward. Chang’s thought-provoking novel translates well to audio.”
Booklist

“Sublime reading [by] narrator Ramón De Ocampo.”
Library Journal

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393063066
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/27/2010
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 1,227,880
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Lan Samantha Chang's fiction has appeared in Atlantic Monthly, Story and The Best American Short Stories 1994 and 1996. Chang is the author of the award-winning books Hunger and Inheritance, and the novel All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost. She is the recipient of the Wallace Stegner and Truman Capote fellowships at Stanford University. She also received, from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, a Teaching-Writing fellowship and a Michener-Copernicus fellowship. Her many awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship, and she was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. She lives in Iowa City, Iowa, where she directs the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    K

    Came here to find a review on this book and i find is a bunch of JUNK from kids playing around. Please bn, cant you put a stop to these kids using the nook and the book review site as a chat room, play room, roleplay room, sext room? Cant they be banned for this????

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2013

    To toxin

    You and me can be the most respected most scared we can biuld a empire and a army we are the FOK

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)