All Talk: The Talkshow in Media Culture [NOOK Book]

Overview


Wayne Munson examines the talkshow as a cultural form whose curious productivity has become vital to America's image economy. As the very name suggests, the talkshow is both interpersonal exchange and mediated spectacle. Its range of topics defies classification: from the sensational and bizarre, to the conventional and the advisory, to politics and world affairs. Munson grapples with the sense and nonsense of the talkshow, particularly its ...

See more details below
All Talk: The Talkshow in Media Culture

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$19.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$34.95 List Price

Overview


Wayne Munson examines the talkshow as a cultural form whose curious productivity has become vital to America's image economy. As the very name suggests, the talkshow is both interpersonal exchange and mediated spectacle. Its range of topics defies classification: from the sensational and bizarre, to the conventional and the advisory, to politics and world affairs. Munson grapples with the sense and nonsense of the talkshow, particularly its audience participation and its construction of knowledge.



This hybrid genre includes the news/talk "magazine," celebrity chat, sports talk, psychotalk, public affairs forum, talk/service program, and call-in interview show. All share characteristics of lucidity and contradiction—the hallmarks of postmodernity—and it is this postmodern identity that Munson examines and links to mass and popular culture, the public sphere, and contemporary political economy.



Munson takes a close look at the talkshow’s history, programs, production methods, and the "talk" about it that pervades media culture—the press, broadcasting, and Hollywood. He analyzes individual shows such as "Geraldo," "The Morton Downey Show," "The McLaughlin Group," and radio call-in "squawk" programs, as well as movies such as Talk Radio and The King of Comedy that investigate the talkshow’s peculiar status. Munson also examines such events as the political organizing of talkhosts and their role in the antitax and anti-incumbency groundswells of the 1990s. In so doing, Munson demonstrates how "infotainment" is rooted in a deliberate uncertainty. The ultimate parasitic media form, the talkshow promiscuously indulges in—and even celebrated—its dependencies and contradictions. It "works" by "playing" with boundaries and identities to personalize the political and politicize the personal. Arguing that the talkshow's form and host are productively ill-defined, Munson asks whether the genre is a degradation of public life or part of a new, revitalized public sphere in which audiences are finally and fully "heard" through interactive.



 
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Describing the talk show as the ``newest and least understood'' neighborhood in America, Munson, who teaches communications/media at Fitchburg State College in Mass., offers a sometimes insightful but often tedious academic survey. Munson traces the talk show's antecedents to 18th-century magazines and the 19th-century lyceum movement and describes its growth on radio and TV. The ad-libbed, news-plus-personality talk show format, he suggests, is designed to grab the attention of viewers by combining the familiar with the unpredicted. Citing Oprah , Downey and the Frank Rizzo Show , among others, Munson concludes that the talk show blurs distinctions between public and private, creating a new ``cyberspatial'' place. But he frequently diminishes the impact of his argument in prose like the following reference to a TV talk show interview of Hugh Hefner: `` Ironically, just as Playboy, in its commodified transgression, opened the middle-class home to sex, Nightbeat parasitically `exposed' that transgression for its own paratextual commodification.'' (Apr.)
From the Publisher

"Through sharp scholarship and rigorous reflection, Wayne Munson negotiates the complexities and contradictions of talk-media to produce compelling insights of a far reaching sort. This book combines close stylistic analysis and broad theoretical mediation in exciting, intellectually engaging fashion."
Dana Polan, University of Pittsburgh, author of Power and Paranoia: History, narrative, and the American Cinema
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439904282
  • Publisher: Temple University Press
  • Publication date: 6/29/2010
  • Series: Culture And The Moving Image
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • File size: 313 KB

Meet the Author

Wayne Munson is Assistant Professor of Communications/Media at Fitchburg State College in Massachusetts.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Contents


Acknowledgments 



Introduction: The Sense of the Talkshow 

1. Turning to Talk: The Talkshow's Development 

2. Constellations of Voices: How Talkshows Work 

3. Making Sense and Nonsense: Talk about the Talkshow 

Postscript: A New Sense of Place 

Notes 

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)