All the Awake Animals Are Almost Asleep

( 2 )

Overview

My little one, lay down your head.
It's time to doze, it's time for bed.
You tell me, "I'm not sleepy now."
"Just try," I say. You ask me, "How?"


In this lyrical animal ABC book, a mother tries to tuck her child in for the night by telling him about all the awake animals...

See more details below
Hardcover
$11.04
BN.com price
(Save 35%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (23) from $4.51   
  • New (14) from $9.48   
  • Used (9) from $4.51   

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK Kids for iPad

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (NOOK Kids Read to Me)
$9.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

My little one, lay down your head.
It's time to doze, it's time for bed.
You tell me, "I'm not sleepy now."
"Just try," I say. You ask me, "How?"


In this lyrical animal ABC book, a mother tries to tuck her child in for the night by telling him about all the awake animals that are getting sleepy. From antlered Antelope to zzz-ing Zebra, this alphabet of animals becomes an exquisite celebration of language and nature, just right for lulling even the most wide-awake little ones into a cozy, soothing slumber.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review
…a familiar tale, but McPhail's watercolors are luxuriously colorful, like a warm, luminescent blanket at bedtime, and the alliterative text is softly lulling.
—Pamela Paul
Publishers Weekly
Parents are wont to point out that just because everyone else is doing something doesn’t mean their offspring should, but Dragonwagon and McPhail provide a persuasive exception. When a small boy resists sleep, his mother points out that “every creature, tame and wild,/ has night and day, has still and leap,/ has wide awake and sound asleep.” While McPhail imagines that some of those weary animals are watching from the doorway and window, Dragonwagon offers an “alphabet of ways to sleep,” smoothly working in some alliteration: “Rabbit relaxes into restful repose, dreaming of ripe red radishes.” With meticulous inking and a palette of watercolors that glows with the soft colors of dusk and twilight, McPhail portrays an animal world where sleep is a welcome visitor and bedding down is an eloquent expression of personality. Each of his animal portraits is a beautiful mix of texture, detail, and mood, whether portraying a yawning, hulking yak or an otter who snoozes while clutching a looping letter “O” like a floatation device. Ages 3–6. Agent: Edite Kroll, Edite Kroll Literary Agency. Illustrator’s agent: Faith Hamlin, Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. (Oct.)
New York Times Book Review
"McPhail's watercolors are luxuriously colorful, like a warm, luminescent blanket at bedtime, and the alliterative text is softly lulling."
Booklist
"Gorgeously serene...beautiful."
From the Publisher
A National Parenting Publications Awards (NAPPA) Gold Winner

* "With meticulous inking and a palette of watercolors that glows with the soft colors of dusk and twilight, McPhail portrays an animal world where sleep is a welcome visitor and bedding down is an eloquent expression of personality."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"McPhail's watercolors are luxuriously colorful, like a warm, luminescent blanket at bedtime, and the alliterative text is softly lulling."—New York Times Book Review

"McPhail's watercolor-and-ink illustrations... are consistently lovely.... A sweet depiction of sleepy animals."—Kirkus Reviews

"[A] cozy alphabet/bedtime hybrid.... Quietly pleasant."—School Library Journal

"Gorgeously serene...beautiful."—Booklist

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
This alphabet book is structured as an invitation to go to sleep. In an introductory verse, a mother tucks her child in at bedtime. She conjures up the many animals who are getting sleepy, starting with Antelope, "...already asleep all the way to his antlers." "Baby Bison has bedded down beside her brother by the barn." And so we go through the alphabet on single or double pages, with ample use of each cited letter in the text below. We end with "Yak yawns and Zebra just Zzzzzzzzzzz's." We end the book with another poem, urging the child to go to sleep. "Ssssh...sssssh...ssssshhh." McPhail uses ink and watercolors to create attractive naturalistic subjects, focusing on animals with accompanying large script letters and brief text. Check the contrasting jacket and cover.
School Library Journal
PreS-K—In this cozy alphabet/bedtime hybrid, a mother tucks her reluctant child into bed, offering examples of how other animals prepare for sleep to convince her little one to doze. The story begins and ends with the mother speaking in soothing rhyming verse; her alphabetized descriptions of "the awake animals getting sleepy" are non-rhyming but mostly alliterative, e.g., "Cat's curled up on a crimson couch cushion." Full-page watercolor and ink illustrations in soft, muted colors depict mildly stylized, drowsy animals (generally one, but sometimes two or three per letter). The large cursive capitals fit well into the overall design of the pages, noticeable but unobtrusive. With dozens, if not hundreds, of other alphabet books out there (including previous alphabet books by Dragonwagon and McPhail), it might be difficult to find room for one more, especially in smaller collections; however, if you are looking for new additions, this one is quietly pleasant.—Yelena Alekseyeva-Popova, formerly at Chappaqua Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Alliteration and animals add up to a child asleep in this latest offering from picture-book veterans Dragonwagon and McPhail. Opening text introduces a familiar bedtime battle of wills between a child who resists slumber and a mother trying to lull him to sleep. This introductory section adopts a rhythmic, rhyming text that culminates with the mother saying, "The answer, darling little child, / is every creature, tame and wild, / has night and day, has still and leap, / has wide awake and sound asleep." Ensuing pages go through the alphabet using alliterative language to describe animals going to sleep, from: "Antelope is already asleep, all the way to his antlers" to "and Zebra just Zzzzzzzzzzs." These entries are rather uneven, and while the mother's recitation may lull the child in the book to sleep, the impact on children listening to the book may be the opposite if they are interested in tracking the alliteration from page to page. Furthermore, the movement away from, and back into, rhyming verse feels rather forced. McPhail's watercolor-and-ink illustrations, however, are consistently lovely in evoking diverse, sleepy fauna and simplified landscapes from page to page, with the pleasing inclusion of animals who appear in the alphabet pages in the opening and closing bedroom scenes. A sweet depiction of sleepy animals that will especially please McPhail fans. (Picture book. 2-4)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316070454
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 10/2/2012
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 117,702
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.40 (w) x 10.20 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

CRESCENT DRAGONWAGON is an award-winning author of more than 50 books, over half of them picture books, including Always, Always, which received the Parents' Choice Literary Honor, and the Coretta Scott King Award-winning Half a Moon and One Whole Star, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney, which was a Reading Rainbow selection. She has also written two novels and several acclaimed cookbooks. The daughter of legendary children's book writer and editor Charlotte Zolotow, she published her first children's book at age 17 (Rainy Day Together, Harper, 1970). She lives in Vermont. Visit her online at www.dragonwagon.com.

DAVID MCPHAIL has been a passionate artist since the age of two. He studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and began illustrating books for children in 1972. Since then he has created dozens of beloved books, including the celebrated Mole Music, which was a New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Book of the Year, the bestselling If You Were My Bunny, Edward and the Pirates, Lost! and Drawing Lessons from a Bear. He lives in New Hampshire.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 15, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Anastacia Hawkins for Readers' Favorite "All t

    Reviewed by Anastacia Hawkins for Readers' Favorite

    "All the Awake Animals are Almost Asleep" is an exquisitely illustrated bedtime book. The story starts out with a mother trying to get her little one to lay down his head and sleep. When he says he is not sleepy, his mother tells him that every creature has “night and day, has still and leap, has wide awake and sound asleep”. This is where the story turns into a lesson in alliteration. From A to Z, the animals are sleeping — Baby Bison has bedded down beside her brother, by the barn while Fox, fading fast, finds rest in the forest. On each page the highlighted letter is drawn in cursive, and we see a sleeping animal that starts with that letter. Fir example, after letter 'L', As the light laps the leaves, Lion lies down, lounging low with Lioness and the little ones.

    "All the Awake Animals" is a lullaby in a book. David McPhail’s soft, watercolor illustrations are soothing and comforting; just seeing all the adorable sleepy animals will inspire yawning and stretching. The rhyming text in the beginning and end of the book is fun to read and listen to. I was a bit disappointed that the rhyming did not continue throughout, but each animal’s alliterative line is soothing to the ear — Turtle is tired, and turns in, tucking each tiny toe into her tight shell. This is more a bedtime book than a teaching tool for the alphabet; we wouldn’t want to stimulate little minds just before bed. But just listening to the sounds the letters make will certainly help to strengthen their understanding.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)