All the Beautiful Sinners

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Overview

Nazareth, Texas

Deputy Sheriff Jim Doe plunges into a renegade manhunt after the town's sheriff is gunned down. But unbeknownst to him, the suspect--an American Indian--holds chilling connections to the disappearance of Doe's sister years before. And the closer Doe gets to the fugitive's trail, the more he realizes that his own involvement in the case is hardly coincidental. A descendant of the Blackfeet Nation himself, Doe keeps getting ...
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Overview

Nazareth, Texas

Deputy Sheriff Jim Doe plunges into a renegade manhunt after the town's sheriff is gunned down. But unbeknownst to him, the suspect--an American Indian--holds chilling connections to the disappearance of Doe's sister years before. And the closer Doe gets to the fugitive's trail, the more he realizes that his own involvement in the case is hardly coincidental. A descendant of the Blackfeet Nation himself, Doe keeps getting mistaken for the killer he's chasing. And when the FBI's finest three profilers descend on the case, Doe suspects the hunt has only just begun.

But beneath the novel's pyrotechnic plotting, the deeper psychic cadences of Stephen Graham Jones's prose take hold. His specific imagery and telling detail coalesce into the literary equivalent of an Edward Hopper painting. But like the other seminal works in the genre (Fight Club, Red Dragon), All The Beautiful Sinners will unnerve you, and it will then send you back to page one to experience its mysteries all over again.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This second novel by Jones (The Fast Red Road: A Plainsong) follows Texas Deputy Sheriff Jim Doe in his chase after the Tin Man, a sociopath who has been abducting Indian children in the heartland for a decade. Jones, who is a member of the Blackfeet Nation, infuses this cleverly plotted detective story with Indian lore: the Tin Man enters Indian homes during tornadoes, always kidnapping a pair of children-a brother and sister-bringing to life an old Indian belief that storms sometimes take a malicious human form. As he tracks the Tin Man along dusty Texas highways and small towns across the country, Doe, who is also Indian, must face his own troubled family history, which includes a mother who abandoned his family and a sister who has been missing for nearly 20 years. The book masterfully plays with the serial killer genre, walking a line between convention and invention and delving into the psychology of both killer and detective. The plot is chilling in itself, but Jones's brisk, clean, visceral prose gives the novel its edgy suspense. Even a brief description of a mundane waiting room, for example, becomes unnerving when Jones describes the protagonists having "left the waiting room chairs at odd angles, the television looking down on them at a severe angle. The coins in Jim Doe's pants jingled as they walked. The hall was seventeen years long." Author tour. (May) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The tale of a serial killer morphs into an incoherent jumble of places, events, and characters. Postmodernist Jones begins cogently enough. Deputy Sheriff Jim Doe flirts with high-school student Terra Donner as they drive through rural Texas. Then Doe's boss calls. The sheriff is tracking a Native American who was spotted shoplifting in a local store. Sensing that Doe wants to be with Donner, the sheriff tackles the matter alone. When he pulls the alleged culprit over, the sheriff discovers the decaying bodies of two children in the trunk of the man's car-and the suspect draws a revolver and blows the sheriff away. FBI agents in Quantico think the deaths may be the work of a serial killer who finds his young victims in towns with biblical names. The sheriff's widow entreats Doe to track the killer, who may also have abducted Doe's sister Jane (yes, Jane Doe). Doe and the FBI agents eventually join up to pursue their quarry across the country as the narrative spins wildly out of control. Dialogue and events become elliptical and, as in Jones's first novel (The Fast Red Road: A Plainsong, 2000), characters' names keep changing, adding to the general confusion, since the work offers scarcely a gram of characterization. Doe may find his sister, who really may not be his sister. A dog in a parking lot becomes a coyote, then becomes a man wearing the skin of a coyote as he glides over the cars. Mr. Rogers (yes, that Mr. Rogers) passes through. Two men named Hari Kari and Jesse James exchange lines such as "Good old 301JN" and "GB4HK . . . ," as Jones pours on the graphic violence, leaning on fragments for dramatic effect. Lots of fragments. Followers of Pynchon, et al., may find the surrealismsignificant. Others will find matters trying and pointless. Author tour. Agent: Kate Garrick/PMA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590710081
  • Publisher: Rugged Land, LLC
  • Publication date: 3/19/2003
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 5.74 (w) x 9.38 (h) x 1.58 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2012

    The e-Book is a Mess

    Whether or not you care for Jones' oddball prose, the Nook version of this book is not recommended because, frankly, it's a mess. (I use a first-generation Nook.) Margins are set so that letters disappear off the edges of the screen. Page breaks occur randomly, mid-paragraph. There are no marks for scene breaks, causing jarring, transitionless shifts. Stray characters appear between paragraphs. There's no table of contents, making navigation a pain (especially since this is a book where you really do need to pop back and re-read occasionally). Reading this book takes far more work than it ought.

    Barnes & Noble does allow publishers to replace e-book files with corrected versions, and hopefully this publisher will do so soon, because as it is, the book is barely legible.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2013

    One of the best, most original crime/serial killer novels in the

    One of the best, most original crime/serial killer novels in the last fifteen years. Excellent prose as well.

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  • Posted October 16, 2010

    a must read

    I love this book. The writing style is really interesting. Jones truly paints pictures with his words and the reader beomes immersed in the storyline and with the characters because the writing is so vivid. It's one of those books that you can't wait to finish because you want to go right back to page one and read it all over again, just so you can catch some of the little nuances you may have missed the first time. A great way to spend a rainy Sunday afternoon.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2003

    A Masterpiece

    buy this book. jones is an amazing talent. his prose carry a rhythm and cadence to them unlike any other piece of fiction. i hope this book and mr. jones recieve the kudos they both deserve. this is a masterpeice in literature and mr. jones can write like no other, his prose will hold you hostage. buy it...now.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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