All the Birds of North America

( 1 )

Overview

A Surer, Faster, Easier Way to Identify Birds

At last, a guide that successfully organizes birds by field-recognizable features for quick identification. For lack of a better method, bird guides have traditionally placed birds in evolutionary sequence, resulting in birding's classic Catch-22 — you must recognize an unknown bird and know its place in the sequence before you can took it up!

All the Birds arranges species by their feeding ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $69.44   
  • Used (12) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$69.44
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(218)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

A Surer, Faster, Easier Way to Identify Birds

At last, a guide that successfully organizes birds by field-recognizable features for quick identification. For lack of a better method, bird guides have traditionally placed birds in evolutionary sequence, resulting in birding's classic Catch-22 — you must recognize an unknown bird and know its place in the sequence before you can took it up!

All the Birds arranges species by their feeding adaptations — features that are easily observed. How a bird feeds largely determines its form. It's nature's way of organizing species to fit ecological niches. The powerful bills and tree-climbing habits of woodpeckers, for instance, are prominent feeding adaptations. Recognizing birds' adaptations for feeding is the natural, no-nonsense way to identify; learn, and understand them.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060527709
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/22/2002
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 4.00 (w) x 8.31 (h) x 0.00 (d)

First Chapter

Great Auk Pinguinus impennis 30"

During the 16th and part of 17th century, great auks were numerous off New England and Newfoundland. Their range extended to waters off Greenland, Iceland, and Europe. They could not fly and lived at sea except to lay their eggs and hatch their young. The only known nesting colonies off North America were at Funk Island, a small rocky outcropping east of Newfoundland, and Bird Rocks in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, but it is probable they nested on suitable islands throughout the North Atlantic.

The Funk Island colony was last recorded in 1785. At that time it had already become well known among fishermen and sailors, who would come ashore, capture the helpless birds, and use them for food or bait. The great auk could be penned alive aboard ship and conveniently butchered as needed. The next recorded account on Funk Island is from 1841, when a naturalist recorded only heaps of bones and mummified remains. On June 3, 1844, at Eldey Rock off Iceland, the last known pair in the world were seen and shot.

Great auks were in summer plumage when they nested and were captured. There is a single specimen, collected in 1815 off Greenland and preserved in Copenhagen, of the bird in winter plumage. It has no oval white spot before the eye. There is a broad band of white above the eye and a gray eyeline extending back to a point just below the ear. The chin and throat are white.

Passenger Pigeon Ectopistes migratorius 16"

Accounts of the passenger pigeon by John J. Audubon, Alexander Wilson, and other early ornithologists seem beyond imagination. Audubon describes flocks that he calculates at more than abillion birds passing en masse for three days: 'The light of the noon day was obscured as if by eclipse ... The dung fell ... not unlike melting flakes of snow." Passenger pigeons were, in fact, so abundant that they comprised more than a quarter of the US bird population.

The flocks lived on the nuts and fruits of the original eastern forest. They wandered irregularly, and where food was plentiful, they would nest in dense colonies up to 40 miles long and several miles wide. Their numbers made commercial harvesting by gunners, netters, and dynamiters profitable. "Wagon loads of them are poured into market ... and Pigeons become the order of the day at dinner, breakfast and supper, until the very name becomes sickening," Wilson reported in 1814.

Passenger pigeons and the eastern forest were destroyed simultaneously. By the end of the 19th century little was left of either. The last major pigeon nestings occurred near the eastern shore of Lake Michigan in 1881 and in Wisconsin in 1882. Small flocks and pairs continued to nest into the 1900s, free from commercial persecution, but the passenger pigeon could not sustain itself in small or moderate numbers. The last one, "Martha," died at the Cincinnati Zoo in 1914.

Ivory-billed Woodpecker Campephilus principalis 20"

Audubon's "king of the woodpeckers" lived in the wet bottomlands of the virgin forest, habitat much like that of the Carolina parakeet. The beetles and grubs that infested dead and dying trees were the ivory-bill's principal foods, and it pursued them with exuberance. It would vigorously rip bark from a tree in large hunks and could shred a deadtree into a splintered trunk barely taller than the mound of chips and bark left around its base. The ringing echoes of the powerful blows from its beak were mixed with its loud, excited calls - yamp, yamp, yamp, like the sound produced by a clarinet mouthpiece.

The bill and crest of the ivory-billed woodpecker were valued as decoration by Native Americans and early hunters, and many birds were shot. However they survived until the last of the old forests, with their dead and dying trees, were cleared. In 1939 an estimated 22 birds still existed, all in remote areas of Florida and Louisiana. Cutting continued until the only known remaining birds were in a 120-square-mile section along the Tensas River in Louisiana. Known as the "Singer Tract," it was cleared for agriculture in 1948. There was not sufficient national will to save the forest or the birds. Reported sightings continued for a number of years, but without large tracts of mature forest the ivory-billed woodpecker was doomed. A Cuban population suffered a similar fate.

All the Birds of North America. Copyright © by Jack Griggs. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)