All the Money in the World: What the Happiest People Know About Wealth [NOOK Book]

Overview

How happy would you be if you had all the money in the world?



The universal lament about money is that there is never enough. We spend endless hours trying to figure out ways to stretch every dollar and kicking ourselves whenever we ...
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All the Money in the World: What the Happiest People Know About Wealth

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Overview

How happy would you be if you had all the money in the world?



The universal lament about money is that there is never enough. We spend endless hours trying to figure out ways to stretch every dollar and kicking ourselves whenever we spend too much or save too little. For all the stress and effort we put into every choice, why are most of us unhappy about our finances?



According to Laura Vanderkam, the key is to change your perspective. Instead of looking at money as a scarce resource, consider it a tool that you can use creatively to build a better life for yourself and the people you care about. Drawing on the latest happiness research as well as the stories of dozens of real people, Vanderkam offers a contrarian approach that forces us to examine our own beliefs, goals, and values.
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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
“In this engaging and thought-provoking book, Laura Vanderkam explains how we can get the most happiness bang for our buck, right here and now, in the way we live our ordinary lives.”
—Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project

“If you have been awake for the last five years, then you know money is emotional. Most of the time we make these massively important decisions about how to earn it, spend it, and save it without pausing to think about how these decisions affect our lives. Laura Vanderkam brings a fresh dose of common sense to this madness by urging us to step back and reexamine the role money plays in our lives. Unlike most personal finance books, which leave you feeling stressed, All the Money in the World will empower you to live a truly richer life.”
—Carl Richards, author of The Behavior Gap: Simple Way to Stop Doing Dumb Things with Money

“With extensive research and rare insight, Laura Vanderkam reveals the financial mind-set that can lead to lasting happiness.”
—Zac Bissonnette, author of Debt-Free U and New York Times bestseller How to be Richer, Smarter, and Better-Looking Than Your Parents

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101560471
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/1/2012
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 314,014
  • File size: 583 KB

Meet the Author

LAURA VANDERKAM is the author of 168 Hours: You Have More Time Than You Think and the runaway hit ebook What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast. She lives in Philadelphia with her husband and their three children.

Visit laurevanderkam.com
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2012

    All The Money In The World is predicated on the idea that, if yo

    All The Money In The World is predicated on the idea that, if you had all the money in the world, how would your life change, and how would that money buy you happiness? Vanderkam wants you to consider both the dream purchases and the practical, everyday impacts that money would create...and then find the ways to start building that life here and now, with the money you currently have. In a similar vein to 168 Hours Vanderkam illustrates the control we have on our finances-- that how we spend our money is choice, that one dollar spent on something is one dollar not spent on something else. This mindset enables one to think more carefully about where their money is going, and if it is being used to build a happy life. Vanderkam starts almost immediately with reframing the idea that money can buy happiness....if you make smart, personal choices with it.

    While Vanderkam avows that she is not a financial guru, her book still gives practical, sensible and usable advice on how we get, spend, share and feel about money. She encourages people to play "offense and not defense" with their money-- thinking how you can make more, rather than how you can scrimp to cut spending. "The Joneses" become a target-- as Vanderkam forces us to question whether the stereotypical major purchases of modern life really bring us happiness, or are we just buying what we think we should be buying, because society encourages us to have big houses, shiny new cars and overflowing closets. I am someone who has always focused on the allocation of money-- from as young as I can remember, when I used to sort my babysitting money in envelopes for spending and saving. I've always also attached a lot of guilt to money, being hypersensitive on every dime I spent, always worried if it was a necessary purchase, or if I could have gotten it for less. This work has reframed my thinking of my finances, and given me the freedom to believe that, if this money is buying me happiness and helping to build the life and world I want to live in, then it is money well spent.

    I argue that both this and Vanderkam's earlier book, 168 Hours, are companion works. Both are built on the same foundation: we don't think we have enough time, we don't think we have enough money, but if we analyze and rethink some aspects of our lives, we will find that we do. I also found that they echoed each other in many places. You can buy time with money, and time well spent can earn you more money. I am so thankful that I've read both of these works. I feel like I am smarter and more sensible as a result, but more importantly, happier.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Ms. Vanderkam’s intentions for writing this book are made

    Ms. Vanderkam’s intentions for writing this book are made clear early, “If money can’t buy happiness, perhaps we’re not spending it right” (p.10). There are three ways to become “rich”: obtain more wealth, use less of the wealth one has or be satisfied with the amount one already possesses. This well done, clearly presented tome is not about money/wealth management, investing nor is it an instruction book on “how to get rich” in the manner that phrase is generally understood. It is, rather, a discourse on how wealth can bring more happiness regardless of the amount of money (or wealth) in one’s “pocket.”
    The suggestions Ms. Vanderkam makes are along the lines of asking the reader to consider how they approach, use and think about wealth. As “wealth” is measured in much broader terms than a particular monetary unit, the answers quickly begin to shift one’s perspective both of their wealth and the meaning of that wealth. When one understands wealth in the limited terms of numbers (bank accounts, houses, cars, etc.) then one seeks to add pleasure by adding “things.” When one asks, “what makes me happiest?” or “what brings me the most pleasure?” the answers rarely take the form of “numbers.” Often, it does take money to fill the list discovered by the questions (proving the truth of the proverb, “Money is only important when you DON’T have it.”) but it does not take as much capital as one fools himself into believing it requires,
    The research the author presents consistently shows two foundations for “being happy” as they relate to wealth: 1) experiences last longer and bring more pleasure than possessions and 2) the pleasure found in giving lasts as long as the memory of the gift and is not dependent upon the particular gift. She repeatedly insists that money does not equal happiness – it is but a means to the end of “happiness.” “Finding” the money to have such experiences, give such gifts or obtain increased “numbers” is a vital part of her argument and a major focus of this work.
    The book does not present itself to have a faith-based or religious basis but it does contain several Biblical references relating to wealth and happiness. Ms. Vanderkam’s research indicates that supporting local businesses does more for the local economy so strongly that the reader will be tempted to boycott all Big Box stores, if only for a day, and buy “local.” With like vigor, the reader’s will begin to accept, at least those who can afford to buy this book (whether they do so or not), that they are among the wealthiest people in human history, irrespective of the size of their bank account, stock portfolio or wardrobe.
    This book will be the next addition to “The Marital Reading List” I give to couples wanting to marry or wishing to strengthen their union. Routinely reassessing one’s view of money/wealth is important; discussing the subject of wealth in a committed relationship is a non-negotiable if the couples wish to afford the happiness they desire. The book can help start that chat.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 13, 2012

    This book has some weird ideas that for this reader kept me thin

    This book has some weird ideas that for this reader kept me thinking to myself WTH…
    But in another hand it had some up points too.
    The book was interesting and informative to a point as long as the author quite straying from the flock so to speak from ideas and idioms.
    Here's a list the ideas that book basically has in it:
    Become aware of what you're doing with your money
    Question yourself about spending, saving and earning
    Determine what you are spending on and why you are doing it
    Make financial decisions accordingly by asking yourself are they worth it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2012

    Hwellllo

    Gdsgdjq this is so goood i think you shouldread it even my grandma enjoyed ittttttttt.. oh ywah

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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